FuelEd

Comprehensive curriculum with a wide variety of courses.

NCAA APPROVED FuelEd (formerly Aventa Learning) offers expanded educational opportunities to students, helps at-risk students succeed and accommodates students’ unique scheduling needs without adding staff or classrooms. FuelEd offers one of the largest catalogs of online courses including core curriculum, electives and world language courses for middle school and high school, and credit recovery courses.

Learning Styles: Linguistic, Intrapersonal, Visual/Spatial, Bodily-Kinesthetic, Musical, Logical Mathematical
Compatibility: Computer & iPad (limited courses)
Delivery Format: Web-based/Consumable materials (grades K-5 and various courses for grades 6-12)
Standards: Oklahoma, CCSS

Click any of the links below to reveal courses.

Elementary

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Math Plus Blue (K)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course introduces students to numbers through 30. Students learn through reading, writing, counting, comparing, ordering, adding, and subtracting. They experience problem solving and encounter early concepts in place value, time, length, weight, and capacity. They learn to gather and display simple data. Students also study two- and three-dimensional figures—they identify, sort, and study patterns and relate mathematical figures to objects in their environment.
Math Plus Green (1)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course extends students' work with place value to numbers through 10, emphasizing fluency of addition and subtraction facts, and focusing on number sentences and problem solving with addition and subtraction. Students begin work with money, telling time, ordering events, and measuring length, weight, and capacity with nonstandard units. Students identify attributes of geometric figures and also extend their work with patterns and data, including representing and comparing data.
Math Plus Orange (2)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course focuses primarily on number concepts, place value, and addition and subtraction of numbers through 1,000. Special emphasis is given to problem solving, inverse operations, properties of operations, decomposition of numbers, and mental math. Students study money, time, and measurement; geometric figures; analyzing and displaying data with new representations; and determining the range and mode of data. Early concepts about multiplication, division, and fractions are introduced.
Math Plus Purple (3)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course emphasizes conceptual understanding of the mathematical operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Students make connections between the operations and practice through problem solving to achieve fluency. The use of problem solving and representing problem situations with equations, which include symbols for unknown values, introduces algebraic thinking. The course addresses fractions through multiple representations, as well as solving real-world problems, giving students the ability to connect the use of fractions with problem situations in a way that makes sense and creates deeper understanding. The course addresses geometry and measurement through introductory work on perimeter, area, and attributes of two-dimensional geometric figures and applying measuring techniques to solving problems involving time, length, capacity, and mass. Throughout the course, problem solving connects individual mathematical skills and concepts in a useful and in-depth way. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.
Math Plus Red (4)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course continues to emphasize the understanding of numbers and operations. There is a focus on computational fluency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers. The course enhances fluency of operations through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data analysis problems using mathematical problemsolving techniques. Students make connections between fraction and decimal representation of numbers. Students study equivalences and relationships between fractions and decimals on the number line and with other models. Students develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems and as they study patterns and rules. They extend their knowledge of geometry through more in-depth classification of shapes and work with lines, angles, and rotations and the connection of geometric concepts to measurement and problem solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.
Math Plus Yellow (5)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course builds on student understanding of numbers and operations by making connections between place value, decimals, and fractions; introducing multiplication and division of decimal numbers; and extending understanding of fraction operations. The course focuses on computational fluency in multiplication and division of whole numbers through the use of standard algorithms. The course enhances fluency of operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data-analysis problems using mathematical problem solving techniques. Students continue to develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems, further study patterns and rules, and are introduced to representing problems graphically using the coordinate plane. They extend their knowledge of geometry through the use of the classification of shapes into hierarchies based on their attributes, the introduction of three-dimensional figures and volume, and connecting geometric concepts to measurement and problem solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.
Language Arts Blue (K)English/Language ArtsIn this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. Phonics: PhonicsWorks prepares students to become independent readers through systematic, multisensory instruction in phonemic awareness and decoding skills, using a kit of magnetized letter tiles and a variety of games and activities. Literature and Comprehension: Plenty of read-aloud literature kindles the imagination while building comprehension and vocabulary. The emphasis is on classic literature—fairy tales, fables, and folktales—including many works that embody exemplary virtues. Language Skills: Traditional poems, nursery rhymes, and riddles help students develop comprehension, vocabulary, and a love of language. Offline vocabulary instruction is accompanied by online review and practice. All About Me lays the foundations of the writing process as students brainstorm, discuss, illustrate, write, and share ideas with others. Handwriting: Handwriting Without Tears provides gentle instruction to help students print letters correctly.
Language Arts Green (1)English/Language ArtsIn this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. Phonics: In the first four lessons, students learn new skills or practice what they’ve previously learned. The fifth lesson in each unit begins with online review and practice activities that reinforce skills learned in the unit and is followed by an offline unit assessment. In some lessons, students read an online decodable reader. These are short, interactive stories that consist entirely of words students are able to read. Students acquire the critical skills and knowledge required for reading and literacy. Literature and Comprehension: The Language Arts Literature and Comprehension program consists of reading selections from the Classics anthology, nonfiction magazines, trade books, and other books students choose for themselves. Students listen to and read a variety of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction to develop their reading comprehension skills. Handwriting: Students further develop their handwriting skills through Handwriting Without Tears. In Semester 1, students will work in the My Printing Book. In Semester 2, students will practice handwriting on their own. Spelling: In Spelling, the first lesson of a unit introduces new spelling words. In the second and third lessons, the teacher and students work together to practice the spelling words introduced in the first lesson. There is an online review in Lesson 4 and an offline assessment in Lesson 5. Students will master the spelling skills needed to read and write proficiently. Vocabulary: Vocabulary exposes students to a wide variety of words. Students learn, review, and
practice words online. In the first eight lessons of each unit, students study three sets of related
words. Lesson 9 of each unit is a review of all the words. The 1th lesson is always a Unit Checkpoint,
testing students on all the words they studied.
Writing Skills: In odd-numbered units, students learn grammar, usage, and mechanics skills that
will help them communicate in Standard English. The fourth lesson of each unit is an online review of
the unit’s skills, and the fifth lesson is an offline assessment. In even-numbered composition units,
students also learn techniques for planning, organizing, and creating different kinds of writing. Each
unit starts with a journal assignment that helps get students writing and generating ideas to be
used in their writing assignments. The program includes rubrics and sample papers to help evaluate
students’ work.
Language Arts Orange (2)English/Language ArtsThis course provides a comprehensive and interrelated sequence of lessons for students to continue building their proficiency in literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting. Literature and Comprehension: A guided reading approach builds comprehension strategies and gradually transitions students to independent reading assignments. Leveled reading selections progressively expose students to new challenges, including greater length, more complex content, and new vocabulary. The emphasis is on classic literature from many cultures, poetry, and nonfiction articles. Students also make their own reading choices to help foster a lifelong love of reading. Writing Skills: Students learn about parts of speech, usage, capitalization, and punctuation and then apply this knowledge as they write sentences and paragraphs. Students are introduced to the process of writing, as they pre-write, draft, revise, and proofread their work before they share it with others. Written products include letters, poems, literature reviews, research reports, and presentations. Vocabulary: Students increase their vocabulary through word study, comprehension, and word analysis, then apply their knowledge in a variety of authentic contexts. Spelling: Students continue their exploration of spelling conventions with lessons in sound–symbol relationships and patterns. Handwriting: Handwriting Without Tears helps students develop printing skills and, if appropriate, begin cursive handwriting
Language Arts Purple (3)English/Language ArtsIn this course, students receive structured lessons in the language arts, a discipline that includes literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting. The purpose of these lessons is to increase reading comprehension, develop fundamental skills in oral and written communication, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards. Literature and Comprehension: In this program, students read a variety of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. The reading selections in each unit share a common theme, topic, or genre. The accompanying lessons develop students’ literal and inferential comprehension skills. Students read selections from the provided materials and then work online to analyze and examine the selections in more depth. They work offline to further evaluate the work, make connections among works and the broader world, and apply the skills that they have learned in written assignments and creative projects. Students also select books that they want to read from a list that is provided and analyze those works. In Critical Skills Practice units, students practice important test-taking skills by reading passages and answering multiple-choice questions about what they have read. These questions are similar to those found on common standardized assessments and state tests. Handwriting: Students further develop their handwriting skills through Handwriting Without Tears. In Semester 1, students work in the Cursive Handwriting book. In Semester 2, students practice cursive on their own as they complete assigned work in other language arts programs. Spelling: The first lesson of a unit introduces new spelling words. In the second and third lessons, you and your students work together to practice the spelling words introduced in the first lesson. These first three lessons are offline. The fourth lesson in each unit is an online review activity. Finally, the fifth lesson consists of an offline Unit Checkpoint that checks students’ mastery of the spelling words. Students master the spelling skills needed to read and write proficiently. Vocabulary: Vocabulary exposes students to a wide variety of words. Students learn, review, and practice words online. These short lessons are entirely online. In the first eight lessons of each unit, students study three sets of related words. Lesson 9 of each unit is a review of all the words. Lesson 1 is always a Unit Checkpoint, testing students on all the words they studied. Writing Skills: Writing Skills units combine online and offline activities to teach students about grammar, usage, and mechanics, as well as how to plan, write, revise, proofread, and publish various forms of writing. For example, in Unit 4, students learn about combining sentences and strategies for writing a personal story. Most units end with an assessment on language skills, along with rubrics and sample papers to help evaluate students’ writing. There are also Critical Skills Practice units that help students apply their knowledge of language, vocabulary, spelling, and writing strategies to answer questions similar to those on standardized tests, including planning and writing a response to a prompt.
Language Arts (4)English/Language ArtsThis comprehensive course covers reading comprehension; analysis; composition; vocabulary; and grammar, usage, and mechanics, including sentence analysis and diagramming. Structured lessons on spelling enable students to recognize base words and roots in related words, while direct and explicit instruction in vocabulary teaches students to identify and clarify meanings of grade levelappropriate and domain-specific words. Lessons are designed to develop reading comprehension, build vocabulary, and help students become more independent readers. The course emphasizes classic literature. Additionally, students read works of nonfiction as well as four novels selected from a long list of classic titles. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.
Language Arts (5)English/Language ArtsThis course provides structured lessons on reading comprehension; analysis; composition; vocabulary; and grammar, usage, and mechanics. Through emphasis on spelling, students learn relationships between sounds and spellings in words and affixes. Targeted vocabulary instruction develops students’ ability to identify, clarify, and expand on the meanings of grade-level appropriate and domain-specific words. Lessons are designed to develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and help students become more independent and thoughtful readers. Students practice writing as they write a memoir, an editorial, a research paper, a business letter, and more. They learn about parts of speech, punctuation, and research skills. Students study literature in a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, drama, and novels. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.
MARK12 Reading I (Remediation) (1 semester)English/Language ArtsMastery. Acceleration. Remediation. K12. MARK12 courses are for students in the third to fifth grades who are struggling readers. MARK12 Reading I gives students who are reading several grades below grade level the opportunity to master missed concepts in a way that accelerates them through the remediation process by incorporating adaptivity and online assessments. Students work independently and with a Learning Coach to develop oral reading, comprehension, phonics, spelling, and fluency skills. They also practice grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success.
MARK12 Reading II (Remediation) (1 semester)English/Language ArtsMastery. Acceleration. Remediation. K12. MARK12 courses are for students in the third to fifth grades who are struggling readers. MARK12 Reading II gives students who are reading two or more grades below grade level the opportunity to master missed concepts in a way that accelerates them through the remediation process by incorporating adaptivity and online assessments. Students work independently and with a Learning Coach to develop oral reading, comprehension, phonics, spelling, and fluency skills. They also practice grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success.
MARK12 Reading III (Remediation) (1 semester)English/Language ArtsMastery. Acceleration. Remediation. K12. MARK12 courses are for students in the third to fifth grades who are struggling readers. MARK12 Reading III gives students who are reading approximately two grades below grade level the opportunity to master missed concepts in a way that accelerates them through the remediation process by incorporating adaptivity and online assessments. Students work independently and with a Learning Coach to develop oral reading, comprehension, phonics, spelling, and fluency skills. They also practice grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success.
Science KScienceKindergarten students begin to develop observation skills as they learn about the five senses, the composition of the earth, and the basic needs of plants and animals. Students also explore topics such as measurement (size, height, length, weight, capacity, and temperature), matter (solid, liquid, and gas), the seasonal cycle, our earth (geography, taking care of the earth), motion (pushes and pulls, magnets), and astronomy (Earth, Sun, Moon, and stars; exploring space; astronauts Neil Armstrong and Sally Ride).
Science 1ScienceStudents learn to perform experiments, record observations, and understand how scientists see the natural world. They germinate seeds to observe plant growth, and make a weather vane. Students also explore topics such as matter (states of matter, mixtures, and solutions), weather (cloud formation, the water cycle), animal classification and adaptation (insects, amphibians, birds, and mammals), habitats (forests, deserts, rain forests), the oceans (waves and currents, coasts, coral reefs), light (how it travels, reflections, and inventor Thomas Edison), plants (germination, functions of roots, stems), and the human body.
Science 2ScienceStudents perform experiments to develop skills of observation and analysis and learn how scientists understand our world. They demonstrate how pulleys lift heavy objects, make a temporary magnet and test its strength, and analyze the parts of a flower. Students explore topics such as the metric system (liters and kilograms), force (motion and simple machines, physicist Isaac Newton), magnetism (magnetic poles and fields, how a compass works), sound (how sounds are made, inventor Alexander Graham Bell), the human body (cells, the digestive system), and geology (layers of the earth, kinds of rocks, weathering).
Science 3ScienceStudents learn to observe and analyze through hands-on experiments and gain further insight into how scientists understand our world. They observe and chart the phases of the moon, determine the properties of insulators and conductors, and make a three-dimensional model of a bone. Students explore topics such as weather (air pressure, precipitation, clouds, humidity, fronts, and forecasting), vertebrates (features of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals), ecosystems (climate zones, tundra, forests, desert, grasslands, freshwater, and marine ecosystems), matter (phase changes, volume, mass, atoms), the human body, energy, light, and astronomy.
Science 4ScienceStudents develop scientific reasoning and perform hands-on experiments in the earth, life, and physical sciences. They construct an electromagnet, identify minerals according to their properties, use chromatography to separate liquids, and assemble food webs. Students explore topics such as the interdependence of life; plant and animal interactions; chemistry; forces and fluids; the human body; the nervous system; invertebrates; electricity and magnetism; rocks and minerals; weathering, erosion, and deposition; the fossil record and the history of life; and the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras.
Science 5ScienceStudents perform experiments, develop scientific reasoning, and recognize science in the world around them. They build a model of a watershed, test how cell membranes function, track a hurricane, and analyze the effects of gravity. Students explore topics such as water resources (aquifers, watersheds, and wetlands), the oceans (currents, waves, tides, the ocean floor), the earth’s atmosphere (weather patterns, maps, forecasts, fronts), motion and forces (pushes or pulls, position and speed, gravity), chemistry (structure of atoms, elements, and compounds), cells and cell processes, taxonomy of plants and animals, and animal physiology.
Early American HistoryHistory and Social SciencesThe first half of a detailed two-year survey of the history of the United States, this course takes students from the arrival of the first people in North America through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Lessons integrate topics in geography, civics, and economics. The course guides students through critical episodes in the story of America. Students investigate Native American civilizations; follow the path of European exploration and colonization; assess the causes and consequences of the American Revolution; examine the Constitution and the growth of the new nation; and analyze what led to the Civil War and its aftermath.
History KHistory and Social SciencesThis beginning course teaches the basics of world geography through a storybook tour of the seven continents, and provides an introduction to American history and civics through a series of biographies of famous Americans. Supplementary lessons introduce students to symbols that represent American freedom; the laws, rights, and responsibilities of citizens; the cultures and traditions of the United States; and basic economic concepts.
History 1History and Social SciencesHistory 1 kicks off a program that, spanning the elementary grades, provides an overview of world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course takes students through the age of classical civilizations. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
History 2History and Social SciencesHistory 2 continues a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the time from ancient Rome to the later Middle Ages. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
History 3History and Social SciencesHistory 3 continues a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the period from the Renaissance through the American Revolution. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
History 4History and Social SciencesHistory 4 concludes a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the period from the Scientific Revolution to modern times. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
French 1World LanguagesThis course for beginners with little exposure to world languages is geared for younger minds, still especially receptive to language learning through contextual interpretation and imitation. Highly visual and amusing stories and activities are geared for these developing students, encouraging them to begin telling stories themselves. This course is not just a set of language lessons but an appealing adventure for young minds. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, oui and non, s’il vous plaît and merci, and other familiar phrases, songs, simple storytelling, and description activities. Vocabulary starts with animals, shapes, and colors and moves to fruits, farm-related words, body parts, family words, and numbers. Grammar topics include simple nouns, first-, second-, and third-person presenttense verbs for simple questions, basic third-person past-tense verbs, interrogative words, simple conjunctions, articles, prepositions, and introductory imperative and infinitive verb forms. Cultural topics introduce the geographies and customs of French-speaking countries. Available on Online School platform only.
French 2World LanguagesThe adventure story continues to build upon the base of vocabulary and linguistic structures introduced in Elementary French 1. Interactive activities and increasingly challenging games continue to drive students toward a strong set of intermediate language skills. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include a wider array of social greetings and more complex storytelling and songs. Vocabulary expands with more terms related to animals, body parts, colors, familial relationships, and numbers. Grammar moves from second- and third-person plural present-tense forms, prepositional phrases, and more first- and third-person present-tense forms to additional conjunctions, reflexive verbs, imperatives, and past-tense forms. Cultural topics include cuisine, climate, geography, and history. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisite: Elementary French 1 (or equivalent)
German 1World LanguagesThis course for beginners with little exposure to world languages is geared for younger minds still especially receptive to language learning through contextual interpretation and imitation. Highly visual and amusing stories and activities are geared for these developing students, encouraging them to begin telling stories themselves. This course is not just a set of language lessons, but an appealing adventure for young minds, rich with graphics, games, and engaging interactive activities. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, ja and nein, danke and bitte and other familiar phrases, songs, simple storytelling, and description activities. Vocabulary starts with animals, body parts, numbers, shapes, small objects, and colors before moving on to food, farm-related words, useful “around town” expressions, and household terminology. Grammar starts with simple nouns, first-, second-, and third-person present-tense verbs, direct and indirect articles, the conjunction und, the pluralization of nouns, third-person plural present-tense verbs, third-person past-tense verbs, simple prepositions, and expressions conveying “there is,” “there are,” “isn’t,” and “will be.” Cultural topics introduce the geographies and customs of German-speaking countries, with a special focus on German-speaking Switzerland. Available on Online School platform only
German 2World LanguagesThe adventure story continues to build upon the base of vocabulary and linguistic structures introduced in Elementary German 1. Interactive activities and increasingly challenging games continue to drive students toward a strong set of intermediate language skills. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include a wider array of social greetings, introductions, simple commands, suggestions, questions, German folk songs, and enhanced storytelling. Vocabulary expands in the domains of animals, body parts, numbers, shapes, small objects, familial relationships, food, cooking, and new words useful for telling stories such as The Three Little Pigs and Chicken Little in German. Grammar adds more third-person present-tense verbs, direct and indirect articles, and the conjunction aber, and progresses toward new third-person plural present-tense forms, thirdperson past-tense verbs, additional prepositions, and expressions conveying understanding. Students are also exposed to the simple future tense in the third person. Cultural topics include cuisine, climate, geography, and history. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisite: Elementary German 1 (or equivalent)
Latin 1World LanguagesLatin remains a vital tool in improving students’ fundamental understanding of English and other languages. Latin comes alive in this course through the use of gaming and multimedia techniques, creating the foundation for a deep understanding of cultural, political, and literary history. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, familiar phrases, relationships, cause and effect, likes and dislikes, and questions. Vocabulary progresses from animals, body parts, family relationships, colors, food, plants, and numbers to small objects, shapes, and household words. Grammar begins with simple sentence construction, first- and third-person verbs, demonstrative pronouns, conjunctions, and simple possession, before moving on to basic third-person past tense and imperative forms as well as certain second-person present-tense forms. Cultural topics introduce the history of the Latin language and daily practices along with military, political, and artistic aspects of the Roman Empire. Available on Online School platform only.
Spanish 1World LanguagesThis course for beginners with little exposure to world languages is geared for younger minds, still especially receptive to language learning through contextual interpretation and imitation. Highly visual and amusing stories and activities are geared for these developing students, encouraging them to begin telling stories themselves. This course is not just a set of language lessons, but an appealing adventure for young minds. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, songs, por favor and gracias, and other expressions of daily courtesy, simple storytelling, and free-response questions. Vocabulary starts with numbers 1–1, animals, and shapes and moves into days of the week, seasons, colors, fruits and vegetables, simple directions, and useful “around town” expressions. Grammar moves from simple sentence construction, first- and third-person verbs, and indefinite articles to demonstrative pronouns, simple conjunctions, simple possession, and ser and estar. Students also begin to encounter the third-person past tense, imperative verbs, and second-person presenttense verbs. Cultural topics introduce the geography and customs of Spanish-speaking countries. Available on Online School platform only
Spanish 2World LanguagesThe adventure story continues to build upon the base of vocabulary and linguistic structures introduced in Elementary Spanish 1. Interactive activities and increasingly challenging games continue to drive students toward a strong set of intermediate language skills. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include social exchanges, more complex storytelling, songs, recipes, word puzzles, and interrogative words. Vocabulary includes advanced family and animal-related words and a review of numbers. Poems, stories, and songs are used throughout. Grammar moves from negative and reflexive verbs and third-person plural present verbs to noun–adjective agreement, first-person past-tense verbs, and the plural imperative. Cultural topics include cuisine, climate, geography, and history. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisite: Elementary Spanish 1 (or equivalent)
Art KElectivesStudents are introduced to the elements of art—line, shape, color, and more. They learn about portraits and landscapes, and realistic and abstract art. Students learn about important paintings, sculpture, and architecture; study the works and lives of artists such as Matisse, Miró, Rembrandt, Hiroshige, Cézanne, Picasso, and Faith Ringgold; and create artworks similar to works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, students create brightly colored paintings inspired by Matisse and make mobiles inspired by Alexander Calder.
Art 1ElectivesArt 1 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of different cultures such as Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, Greece, and China. Students identify landscapes, still lifes, and portraits; study elements of art such as line, shape, and texture; and create art similar to the works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, inspired by Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night, students paint their own starry landscape using bold brushstrokes and make clay sculptures inspired by a bust of Queen Nefertiti and the Great Sphinx.
Art 2ElectivesArt 2 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Rome, medieval Europe, the Islamic Empire, Mexico, Africa, China, and Japan. Students examine elements of art and principles of design such as line, shape, pattern, and more; study and create self-portraits, landscapes, sculptures, and more; and create artworks similar to works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying Winslow Homer’s Snap the Whip, students paint their own narrative landscape, and design stained glass windows inspired by the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.
Art 3ElectivesArt 3 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of the Renaissance throughout Europe, including Italy, Russia, and northern Europe. Students also investigate artworks from Asia, Africa, and the Americas created during the same time period. Students extend their knowledge of elements of art and principles of design—such as form, texture, and symmetry—and draw, paint, and sculpt a variety of works, including self-portraits, landscapes, and still-life paintings. For example, after studying da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, students use shading in their own drawings and make prints showing the features and symmetry of the Taj Mahal.
Art 4ElectivesLessons include an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture from the French and American revolutions through modern times. Students study and create artworks in various media, including portraits, quilts, sculpture, collages, and more; investigate the art of the United States, Europe, Japan, Mexico, and Africa; learn about impressionism, cubism, art nouveau, and regionalism; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying sculptures and paintings of ballerinas by Edgar Degas, students create their own clay sculptures of a figure in motion.
Early American ArtElectivesEarly American Art includes an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture of North America, from pre-Columbian times through 1877. Students study and create various works, both realistic and abstract, including sketches, masks, architectural models, prints, and paintings; investigate the art of the Native Americans, and Colonial and Federal America; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying John James Audubon’s extraordinary paintings of birds, students make bird paintings with realistic color and texture.
K-5 Intro to Online LearningElectivesFamilies begin the school year with an Intro to Online Learning course. The course provides an overview of each curriculum area so students and Learning Coaches can familiarize themselves with the philosophy behind the curriculum methodology and overall course organization. The lessons are interactive and include actual animations or graphics that are used in the courses themselves. By the end of the course, students will be fully prepared to begin their lessons in the online school.
Physical Education with LessonsElectivesHealthy, active adults started out as active children. It is important for children to engage in daily physical activity. The old saying, “Strong minds, strong bodies,” still holds true. To get fit and stay fit, children need to exercise regularly. It’s work—but it’s also fun! This program is designed to engage your student in activities that reinforce basic physical skills and improve overall fitness levels. Each lesson provides a schedule of instructions for five days of activities.
Spotlight on Music, KindergartenElectivesExplore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, listening maps, and authentic sound recordings. Music comes to life in the course through six units that are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context. Students explore music from around the world while also exploring beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, form, tone color, dynamics, tempo, style, and music background. Students also have the opportunity to perform seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only.
Spotlight on Music Grade 1ElectivesExplore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, listening maps, and authentic sound recordings. Music comes to life in the course through six units that are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context. Students explore music from around the world while also exploring beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, style, and music background. Students also have the opportunity to perform seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only.
Spotlight on Music Grade 2ElectivesExplore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, listening maps, and authentic sound recordings. Music comes to life in the course through six units that are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context. Students explore music from around the world while also exploring beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, style, and music background. Students also have the opportunity to perform seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only
Spotlight on Music Grade 3ElectivesGet ready to travel the world through music as students explore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This hands-on music course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, playing the recorder, listening maps, authentic sound recordings with famous past and present artists, and a player that allows students to customize key signatures, tempo, and lyrical highlighting. Six units in the course are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context, while exploring music from all over the world. Students also learn to read music and explore beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, tonality, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, articulation, style, and music background. Students apply the music skills they are learning while performing seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only
Spotlight on Music Grade 4ElectivesGet ready to travel the world through music as students explore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This hands-on music course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, playing the recorder, listening maps, authentic sound recordings with famous past and present artists, and an iSong player that allows students to customize key signatures, tempo, and lyrical highlighting. Six units in the course are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context, while exploring music from all over the world. Students also learn to read music and explore beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, tonality, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, articulation, style, and music background. Students apply the music skills they are learning while performing seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only
Spotlight on Music Grade 5ElectivesGet ready to travel the world through music as students explore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This hands-on music course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, playing the recorder, listening maps, authentic sound recordings with famous past and present artists, and an iSong player that allows students to customize key signatures, tempo, and lyrical highlighting. Six units in the course are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context, while exploring music from all over the world. Students also learn to read music and explore beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, tonality, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, articulation, style, and music background. Students apply the music skills they are learning while performing seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only.

Middle School

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Math Plus Blue (K)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course introduces students to numbers through 30. Students learn through reading, writing, counting, comparing, ordering, adding, and subtracting. They experience problem solving and encounter early concepts in place value, time, length, weight, and capacity. They learn to gather and display simple data. Students also study two- and three-dimensional figures—they identify, sort, and study patterns and relate mathematical figures to objects in their environment.
Math Plus Green (1)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course extends students' work with place value to numbers through 10, emphasizing fluency of addition and subtraction facts, and focusing on number sentences and problem solving with addition and subtraction. Students begin work with money, telling time, ordering events, and measuring length, weight, and capacity with nonstandard units. Students identify attributes of geometric figures and also extend their work with patterns and data, including representing and comparing data.
Math Plus Orange (2)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course focuses primarily on number concepts, place value, and addition and subtraction of numbers through 1,000. Special emphasis is given to problem solving, inverse operations, properties of operations, decomposition of numbers, and mental math. Students study money, time, and measurement; geometric figures; analyzing and displaying data with new representations; and determining the range and mode of data. Early concepts about multiplication, division, and fractions are introduced.
Math Plus Purple (3)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course emphasizes conceptual understanding of the mathematical operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Students make connections between the operations and practice through problem solving to achieve fluency. The use of problem solving and representing problem situations with equations, which include symbols for unknown values, introduces algebraic thinking. The course addresses fractions through multiple representations, as well as solving real-world problems, giving students the ability to connect the use of fractions with problem situations in a way that makes sense and creates deeper understanding. The course addresses geometry and measurement through introductory work on perimeter, area, and attributes of two-dimensional geometric figures and applying measuring techniques to solving problems involving time, length, capacity, and mass. Throughout the course, problem solving connects individual mathematical skills and concepts in a useful and in-depth way. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.
Math Plus Red (4)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course continues to emphasize the understanding of numbers and operations. There is a focus on computational fluency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers. The course enhances fluency of operations through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data analysis problems using mathematical problemsolving techniques. Students make connections between fraction and decimal representation of numbers. Students study equivalences and relationships between fractions and decimals on the number line and with other models. Students develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems and as they study patterns and rules. They extend their knowledge of geometry through more in-depth classification of shapes and work with lines, angles, and rotations and the connection of geometric concepts to measurement and problem solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.
Math Plus Yellow (5)MathThis course focuses on computational fluency, conceptual understanding, and problem solving. The engaging lessons feature new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success. This course builds on student understanding of numbers and operations by making connections between place value, decimals, and fractions; introducing multiplication and division of decimal numbers; and extending understanding of fraction operations. The course focuses on computational fluency in multiplication and division of whole numbers through the use of standard algorithms. The course enhances fluency of operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals through application in the solving of measurement, geometry, and data-analysis problems using mathematical problem solving techniques. Students continue to develop algebraic thinking as they work with variables and formulas to solve multistep word problems, further study patterns and rules, and are introduced to representing problems graphically using the coordinate plane. They extend their knowledge of geometry through the use of the classification of shapes into hierarchies based on their attributes, the introduction of three-dimensional figures and volume, and connecting geometric concepts to measurement and problem solving. This course includes standards-based tasks, digital literacy skills, and assessment questions.
Language Arts Blue (K)English/Language ArtsIn this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. Phonics: PhonicsWorks prepares students to become independent readers through systematic, multisensory instruction in phonemic awareness and decoding skills, using a kit of magnetized letter tiles and a variety of games and activities. Literature and Comprehension: Plenty of read-aloud literature kindles the imagination while building comprehension and vocabulary. The emphasis is on classic literature—fairy tales, fables, and folktales—including many works that embody exemplary virtues. Language Skills: Traditional poems, nursery rhymes, and riddles help students develop comprehension, vocabulary, and a love of language. Offline vocabulary instruction is accompanied by online review and practice. All About Me lays the foundations of the writing process as students brainstorm, discuss, illustrate, write, and share ideas with others. Handwriting: Handwriting Without Tears provides gentle instruction to help students print letters correctly.
Language Arts Green (1)English/Language ArtsIn this course, students receive structured lessons on readiness skills through emphasis on phonics, language skills, literature, and handwriting to help develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. Phonics: In the first four lessons, students learn new skills or practice what they’ve previously learned. The fifth lesson in each unit begins with online review and practice activities that reinforce skills learned in the unit and is followed by an offline unit assessment. In some lessons, students read an online decodable reader. These are short, interactive stories that consist entirely of words students are able to read. Students acquire the critical skills and knowledge required for reading and literacy. Literature and Comprehension: The Language Arts Literature and Comprehension program consists of reading selections from the Classics anthology, nonfiction magazines, trade books, and other books students choose for themselves. Students listen to and read a variety of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction to develop their reading comprehension skills. Handwriting: Students further develop their handwriting skills through Handwriting Without Tears. In Semester 1, students will work in the My Printing Book. In Semester 2, students will practice handwriting on their own. Spelling: In Spelling, the first lesson of a unit introduces new spelling words. In the second and third lessons, the teacher and students work together to practice the spelling words introduced in the first lesson. There is an online review in Lesson 4 and an offline assessment in Lesson 5. Students will master the spelling skills needed to read and write proficiently. Vocabulary: Vocabulary exposes students to a wide variety of words. Students learn, review, and
practice words online. In the first eight lessons of each unit, students study three sets of related
words. Lesson 9 of each unit is a review of all the words. The 1th lesson is always a Unit Checkpoint,
testing students on all the words they studied.
Writing Skills: In odd-numbered units, students learn grammar, usage, and mechanics skills that
will help them communicate in Standard English. The fourth lesson of each unit is an online review of
the unit’s skills, and the fifth lesson is an offline assessment. In even-numbered composition units,
students also learn techniques for planning, organizing, and creating different kinds of writing. Each
unit starts with a journal assignment that helps get students writing and generating ideas to be
used in their writing assignments. The program includes rubrics and sample papers to help evaluate
students’ work.
Language Arts Orange (2)English/Language ArtsThis course provides a comprehensive and interrelated sequence of lessons for students to continue building their proficiency in literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting. Literature and Comprehension: A guided reading approach builds comprehension strategies and gradually transitions students to independent reading assignments. Leveled reading selections progressively expose students to new challenges, including greater length, more complex content, and new vocabulary. The emphasis is on classic literature from many cultures, poetry, and nonfiction articles. Students also make their own reading choices to help foster a lifelong love of reading. Writing Skills: Students learn about parts of speech, usage, capitalization, and punctuation and then apply this knowledge as they write sentences and paragraphs. Students are introduced to the process of writing, as they pre-write, draft, revise, and proofread their work before they share it with others. Written products include letters, poems, literature reviews, research reports, and presentations. Vocabulary: Students increase their vocabulary through word study, comprehension, and word analysis, then apply their knowledge in a variety of authentic contexts. Spelling: Students continue their exploration of spelling conventions with lessons in sound–symbol relationships and patterns. Handwriting: Handwriting Without Tears helps students develop printing skills and, if appropriate, begin cursive handwriting
Language Arts Purple (3)English/Language ArtsIn this course, students receive structured lessons in the language arts, a discipline that includes literature and comprehension, writing skills, vocabulary, spelling, and handwriting. The purpose of these lessons is to increase reading comprehension, develop fundamental skills in oral and written communication, build vocabulary, and promote a lifelong interest in reading. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards. Literature and Comprehension: In this program, students read a variety of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. The reading selections in each unit share a common theme, topic, or genre. The accompanying lessons develop students’ literal and inferential comprehension skills. Students read selections from the provided materials and then work online to analyze and examine the selections in more depth. They work offline to further evaluate the work, make connections among works and the broader world, and apply the skills that they have learned in written assignments and creative projects. Students also select books that they want to read from a list that is provided and analyze those works. In Critical Skills Practice units, students practice important test-taking skills by reading passages and answering multiple-choice questions about what they have read. These questions are similar to those found on common standardized assessments and state tests. Handwriting: Students further develop their handwriting skills through Handwriting Without Tears. In Semester 1, students work in the Cursive Handwriting book. In Semester 2, students practice cursive on their own as they complete assigned work in other language arts programs. Spelling: The first lesson of a unit introduces new spelling words. In the second and third lessons, you and your students work together to practice the spelling words introduced in the first lesson. These first three lessons are offline. The fourth lesson in each unit is an online review activity. Finally, the fifth lesson consists of an offline Unit Checkpoint that checks students’ mastery of the spelling words. Students master the spelling skills needed to read and write proficiently. Vocabulary: Vocabulary exposes students to a wide variety of words. Students learn, review, and practice words online. These short lessons are entirely online. In the first eight lessons of each unit, students study three sets of related words. Lesson 9 of each unit is a review of all the words. Lesson 1 is always a Unit Checkpoint, testing students on all the words they studied. Writing Skills: Writing Skills units combine online and offline activities to teach students about grammar, usage, and mechanics, as well as how to plan, write, revise, proofread, and publish various forms of writing. For example, in Unit 4, students learn about combining sentences and strategies for writing a personal story. Most units end with an assessment on language skills, along with rubrics and sample papers to help evaluate students’ writing. There are also Critical Skills Practice units that help students apply their knowledge of language, vocabulary, spelling, and writing strategies to answer questions similar to those on standardized tests, including planning and writing a response to a prompt.
Language Arts (4)English/Language ArtsThis comprehensive course covers reading comprehension; analysis; composition; vocabulary; and grammar, usage, and mechanics, including sentence analysis and diagramming. Structured lessons on spelling enable students to recognize base words and roots in related words, while direct and explicit instruction in vocabulary teaches students to identify and clarify meanings of grade levelappropriate and domain-specific words. Lessons are designed to develop reading comprehension, build vocabulary, and help students become more independent readers. The course emphasizes classic literature. Additionally, students read works of nonfiction as well as four novels selected from a long list of classic titles. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.
Language Arts (5)English/Language ArtsThis course provides structured lessons on reading comprehension; analysis; composition; vocabulary; and grammar, usage, and mechanics. Through emphasis on spelling, students learn relationships between sounds and spellings in words and affixes. Targeted vocabulary instruction develops students’ ability to identify, clarify, and expand on the meanings of grade-level appropriate and domain-specific words. Lessons are designed to develop comprehension, build vocabulary, and help students become more independent and thoughtful readers. Students practice writing as they write a memoir, an editorial, a research paper, a business letter, and more. They learn about parts of speech, punctuation, and research skills. Students study literature in a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, nonfiction, drama, and novels. This course addresses current thinking in assessment standards.
MARK12 Reading I (Remediation) (1 semester)English/Language ArtsMastery. Acceleration. Remediation. K12. MARK12 courses are for students in the third to fifth grades who are struggling readers. MARK12 Reading I gives students who are reading several grades below grade level the opportunity to master missed concepts in a way that accelerates them through the remediation process by incorporating adaptivity and online assessments. Students work independently and with a Learning Coach to develop oral reading, comprehension, phonics, spelling, and fluency skills. They also practice grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success.
MARK12 Reading II (Remediation) (1 semester)English/Language ArtsMastery. Acceleration. Remediation. K12. MARK12 courses are for students in the third to fifth grades who are struggling readers. MARK12 Reading II gives students who are reading two or more grades below grade level the opportunity to master missed concepts in a way that accelerates them through the remediation process by incorporating adaptivity and online assessments. Students work independently and with a Learning Coach to develop oral reading, comprehension, phonics, spelling, and fluency skills. They also practice grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success.
MARK12 Reading III (Remediation) (1 semester)English/Language ArtsMastery. Acceleration. Remediation. K12. MARK12 courses are for students in the third to fifth grades who are struggling readers. MARK12 Reading III gives students who are reading approximately two grades below grade level the opportunity to master missed concepts in a way that accelerates them through the remediation process by incorporating adaptivity and online assessments. Students work independently and with a Learning Coach to develop oral reading, comprehension, phonics, spelling, and fluency skills. They also practice grammar, usage, mechanics, and composition. The engaging course features new graphics, learning tools, and games; adaptive activities that help struggling students master concepts and skills before moving on; and more support for Learning Coaches to guide their students to success.
Science KScienceKindergarten students begin to develop observation skills as they learn about the five senses, the composition of the earth, and the basic needs of plants and animals. Students also explore topics such as measurement (size, height, length, weight, capacity, and temperature), matter (solid, liquid, and gas), the seasonal cycle, our earth (geography, taking care of the earth), motion (pushes and pulls, magnets), and astronomy (Earth, Sun, Moon, and stars; exploring space; astronauts Neil Armstrong and Sally Ride).
Science 1ScienceStudents learn to perform experiments, record observations, and understand how scientists see the natural world. They germinate seeds to observe plant growth, and make a weather vane. Students also explore topics such as matter (states of matter, mixtures, and solutions), weather (cloud formation, the water cycle), animal classification and adaptation (insects, amphibians, birds, and mammals), habitats (forests, deserts, rain forests), the oceans (waves and currents, coasts, coral reefs), light (how it travels, reflections, and inventor Thomas Edison), plants (germination, functions of roots, stems), and the human body.
Science 2ScienceStudents perform experiments to develop skills of observation and analysis and learn how scientists understand our world. They demonstrate how pulleys lift heavy objects, make a temporary magnet and test its strength, and analyze the parts of a flower. Students explore topics such as the metric system (liters and kilograms), force (motion and simple machines, physicist Isaac Newton), magnetism (magnetic poles and fields, how a compass works), sound (how sounds are made, inventor Alexander Graham Bell), the human body (cells, the digestive system), and geology (layers of the earth, kinds of rocks, weathering).
Science 3ScienceStudents learn to observe and analyze through hands-on experiments and gain further insight into how scientists understand our world. They observe and chart the phases of the moon, determine the properties of insulators and conductors, and make a three-dimensional model of a bone. Students explore topics such as weather (air pressure, precipitation, clouds, humidity, fronts, and forecasting), vertebrates (features of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals), ecosystems (climate zones, tundra, forests, desert, grasslands, freshwater, and marine ecosystems), matter (phase changes, volume, mass, atoms), the human body, energy, light, and astronomy.
Science 4ScienceStudents develop scientific reasoning and perform hands-on experiments in the earth, life, and physical sciences. They construct an electromagnet, identify minerals according to their properties, use chromatography to separate liquids, and assemble food webs. Students explore topics such as the interdependence of life; plant and animal interactions; chemistry; forces and fluids; the human body; the nervous system; invertebrates; electricity and magnetism; rocks and minerals; weathering, erosion, and deposition; the fossil record and the history of life; and the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras.
Science 5ScienceStudents perform experiments, develop scientific reasoning, and recognize science in the world around them. They build a model of a watershed, test how cell membranes function, track a hurricane, and analyze the effects of gravity. Students explore topics such as water resources (aquifers, watersheds, and wetlands), the oceans (currents, waves, tides, the ocean floor), the earth’s atmosphere (weather patterns, maps, forecasts, fronts), motion and forces (pushes or pulls, position and speed, gravity), chemistry (structure of atoms, elements, and compounds), cells and cell processes, taxonomy of plants and animals, and animal physiology.
Early American HistoryHistory and Social SciencesThe first half of a detailed two-year survey of the history of the United States, this course takes students from the arrival of the first people in North America through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Lessons integrate topics in geography, civics, and economics. The course guides students through critical episodes in the story of America. Students investigate Native American civilizations; follow the path of European exploration and colonization; assess the causes and consequences of the American Revolution; examine the Constitution and the growth of the new nation; and analyze what led to the Civil War and its aftermath.
History KHistory and Social SciencesThis beginning course teaches the basics of world geography through a storybook tour of the seven continents, and provides an introduction to American history and civics through a series of biographies of famous Americans. Supplementary lessons introduce students to symbols that represent American freedom; the laws, rights, and responsibilities of citizens; the cultures and traditions of the United States; and basic economic concepts.
History 1History and Social SciencesHistory 1 kicks off a program that, spanning the elementary grades, provides an overview of world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course takes students through the age of classical civilizations. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
History 2History and Social SciencesHistory 2 continues a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the time from ancient Rome to the later Middle Ages. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
History 3History and Social SciencesHistory 3 continues a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the period from the Renaissance through the American Revolution. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
History 4History and Social SciencesHistory 4 concludes a program that spans the elementary grades, exploring world geography and history from the Stone Age to the Space Age. This course focuses on the period from the Scientific Revolution to modern times. Supplementary lessons focus on concepts in economics and citizenship.
French 1World LanguagesThis course for beginners with little exposure to world languages is geared for younger minds, still especially receptive to language learning through contextual interpretation and imitation. Highly visual and amusing stories and activities are geared for these developing students, encouraging them to begin telling stories themselves. This course is not just a set of language lessons but an appealing adventure for young minds. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, oui and non, s’il vous plaît and merci, and other familiar phrases, songs, simple storytelling, and description activities. Vocabulary starts with animals, shapes, and colors and moves to fruits, farm-related words, body parts, family words, and numbers. Grammar topics include simple nouns, first-, second-, and third-person presenttense verbs for simple questions, basic third-person past-tense verbs, interrogative words, simple conjunctions, articles, prepositions, and introductory imperative and infinitive verb forms. Cultural topics introduce the geographies and customs of French-speaking countries. Available on Online School platform only.
French 2World LanguagesThe adventure story continues to build upon the base of vocabulary and linguistic structures introduced in Elementary French 1. Interactive activities and increasingly challenging games continue to drive students toward a strong set of intermediate language skills. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include a wider array of social greetings and more complex storytelling and songs. Vocabulary expands with more terms related to animals, body parts, colors, familial relationships, and numbers. Grammar moves from second- and third-person plural present-tense forms, prepositional phrases, and more first- and third-person present-tense forms to additional conjunctions, reflexive verbs, imperatives, and past-tense forms. Cultural topics include cuisine, climate, geography, and history. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisite: Elementary French 1 (or equivalent)
German 1World LanguagesThis course for beginners with little exposure to world languages is geared for younger minds still especially receptive to language learning through contextual interpretation and imitation. Highly visual and amusing stories and activities are geared for these developing students, encouraging them to begin telling stories themselves. This course is not just a set of language lessons, but an appealing adventure for young minds, rich with graphics, games, and engaging interactive activities. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, ja and nein, danke and bitte and other familiar phrases, songs, simple storytelling, and description activities. Vocabulary starts with animals, body parts, numbers, shapes, small objects, and colors before moving on to food, farm-related words, useful “around town” expressions, and household terminology. Grammar starts with simple nouns, first-, second-, and third-person present-tense verbs, direct and indirect articles, the conjunction und, the pluralization of nouns, third-person plural present-tense verbs, third-person past-tense verbs, simple prepositions, and expressions conveying “there is,” “there are,” “isn’t,” and “will be.” Cultural topics introduce the geographies and customs of German-speaking countries, with a special focus on German-speaking Switzerland. Available on Online School platform only
German 2World LanguagesThe adventure story continues to build upon the base of vocabulary and linguistic structures introduced in Elementary German 1. Interactive activities and increasingly challenging games continue to drive students toward a strong set of intermediate language skills. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include a wider array of social greetings, introductions, simple commands, suggestions, questions, German folk songs, and enhanced storytelling. Vocabulary expands in the domains of animals, body parts, numbers, shapes, small objects, familial relationships, food, cooking, and new words useful for telling stories such as The Three Little Pigs and Chicken Little in German. Grammar adds more third-person present-tense verbs, direct and indirect articles, and the conjunction aber, and progresses toward new third-person plural present-tense forms, thirdperson past-tense verbs, additional prepositions, and expressions conveying understanding. Students are also exposed to the simple future tense in the third person. Cultural topics include cuisine, climate, geography, and history. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisite: Elementary German 1 (or equivalent)
Latin 1World LanguagesLatin remains a vital tool in improving students’ fundamental understanding of English and other languages. Latin comes alive in this course through the use of gaming and multimedia techniques, creating the foundation for a deep understanding of cultural, political, and literary history. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, familiar phrases, relationships, cause and effect, likes and dislikes, and questions. Vocabulary progresses from animals, body parts, family relationships, colors, food, plants, and numbers to small objects, shapes, and household words. Grammar begins with simple sentence construction, first- and third-person verbs, demonstrative pronouns, conjunctions, and simple possession, before moving on to basic third-person past tense and imperative forms as well as certain second-person present-tense forms. Cultural topics introduce the history of the Latin language and daily practices along with military, political, and artistic aspects of the Roman Empire. Available on Online School platform only.
Spanish 1World LanguagesThis course for beginners with little exposure to world languages is geared for younger minds, still especially receptive to language learning through contextual interpretation and imitation. Highly visual and amusing stories and activities are geared for these developing students, encouraging them to begin telling stories themselves. This course is not just a set of language lessons, but an appealing adventure for young minds. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include greetings, introductions, songs, por favor and gracias, and other expressions of daily courtesy, simple storytelling, and free-response questions. Vocabulary starts with numbers 1–1, animals, and shapes and moves into days of the week, seasons, colors, fruits and vegetables, simple directions, and useful “around town” expressions. Grammar moves from simple sentence construction, first- and third-person verbs, and indefinite articles to demonstrative pronouns, simple conjunctions, simple possession, and ser and estar. Students also begin to encounter the third-person past tense, imperative verbs, and second-person presenttense verbs. Cultural topics introduce the geography and customs of Spanish-speaking countries. Available on Online School platform only
Spanish 2World LanguagesThe adventure story continues to build upon the base of vocabulary and linguistic structures introduced in Elementary Spanish 1. Interactive activities and increasingly challenging games continue to drive students toward a strong set of intermediate language skills. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Communication expressions include social exchanges, more complex storytelling, songs, recipes, word puzzles, and interrogative words. Vocabulary includes advanced family and animal-related words and a review of numbers. Poems, stories, and songs are used throughout. Grammar moves from negative and reflexive verbs and third-person plural present verbs to noun–adjective agreement, first-person past-tense verbs, and the plural imperative. Cultural topics include cuisine, climate, geography, and history. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisite: Elementary Spanish 1 (or equivalent)
Art KElectivesStudents are introduced to the elements of art—line, shape, color, and more. They learn about portraits and landscapes, and realistic and abstract art. Students learn about important paintings, sculpture, and architecture; study the works and lives of artists such as Matisse, Miró, Rembrandt, Hiroshige, Cézanne, Picasso, and Faith Ringgold; and create artworks similar to works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, students create brightly colored paintings inspired by Matisse and make mobiles inspired by Alexander Calder.
Art 1ElectivesArt 1 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of different cultures such as Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, Greece, and China. Students identify landscapes, still lifes, and portraits; study elements of art such as line, shape, and texture; and create art similar to the works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, inspired by Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night, students paint their own starry landscape using bold brushstrokes and make clay sculptures inspired by a bust of Queen Nefertiti and the Great Sphinx.
Art 2ElectivesArt 2 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Rome, medieval Europe, the Islamic Empire, Mexico, Africa, China, and Japan. Students examine elements of art and principles of design such as line, shape, pattern, and more; study and create self-portraits, landscapes, sculptures, and more; and create artworks similar to works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying Winslow Homer’s Snap the Whip, students paint their own narrative landscape, and design stained glass windows inspired by the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.
Art 3ElectivesArt 3 lessons include an introduction to the art and architecture of the Renaissance throughout Europe, including Italy, Russia, and northern Europe. Students also investigate artworks from Asia, Africa, and the Americas created during the same time period. Students extend their knowledge of elements of art and principles of design—such as form, texture, and symmetry—and draw, paint, and sculpt a variety of works, including self-portraits, landscapes, and still-life paintings. For example, after studying da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, students use shading in their own drawings and make prints showing the features and symmetry of the Taj Mahal.
Art 4ElectivesLessons include an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture from the French and American revolutions through modern times. Students study and create artworks in various media, including portraits, quilts, sculpture, collages, and more; investigate the art of the United States, Europe, Japan, Mexico, and Africa; learn about impressionism, cubism, art nouveau, and regionalism; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying sculptures and paintings of ballerinas by Edgar Degas, students create their own clay sculptures of a figure in motion.
Early American ArtElectivesEarly American Art includes an introduction to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture of North America, from pre-Columbian times through 1877. Students study and create various works, both realistic and abstract, including sketches, masks, architectural models, prints, and paintings; investigate the art of the Native Americans, and Colonial and Federal America; and create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques. For example, after studying John James Audubon’s extraordinary paintings of birds, students make bird paintings with realistic color and texture.
K-5 Intro to Online LearningElectivesFamilies begin the school year with an Intro to Online Learning course. The course provides an overview of each curriculum area so students and Learning Coaches can familiarize themselves with the philosophy behind the curriculum methodology and overall course organization. The lessons are interactive and include actual animations or graphics that are used in the courses themselves. By the end of the course, students will be fully prepared to begin their lessons in the online school.
Physical Education with LessonsElectivesHealthy, active adults started out as active children. It is important for children to engage in daily physical activity. The old saying, “Strong minds, strong bodies,” still holds true. To get fit and stay fit, children need to exercise regularly. It’s work—but it’s also fun! This program is designed to engage your student in activities that reinforce basic physical skills and improve overall fitness levels. Each lesson provides a schedule of instructions for five days of activities.
Spotlight on Music, KindergartenElectivesExplore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, listening maps, and authentic sound recordings. Music comes to life in the course through six units that are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context. Students explore music from around the world while also exploring beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, form, tone color, dynamics, tempo, style, and music background. Students also have the opportunity to perform seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only.
Spotlight on Music Grade 1ElectivesExplore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, listening maps, and authentic sound recordings. Music comes to life in the course through six units that are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context. Students explore music from around the world while also exploring beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, style, and music background. Students also have the opportunity to perform seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only.
Spotlight on Music Grade 2ElectivesExplore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, listening maps, and authentic sound recordings. Music comes to life in the course through six units that are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context. Students explore music from around the world while also exploring beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, style, and music background. Students also have the opportunity to perform seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only
Spotlight on Music Grade 3ElectivesGet ready to travel the world through music as students explore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This hands-on music course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, playing the recorder, listening maps, authentic sound recordings with famous past and present artists, and a player that allows students to customize key signatures, tempo, and lyrical highlighting. Six units in the course are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context, while exploring music from all over the world. Students also learn to read music and explore beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, tonality, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, articulation, style, and music background. Students apply the music skills they are learning while performing seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only
Spotlight on Music Grade 4ElectivesGet ready to travel the world through music as students explore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This hands-on music course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, playing the recorder, listening maps, authentic sound recordings with famous past and present artists, and an iSong player that allows students to customize key signatures, tempo, and lyrical highlighting. Six units in the course are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context, while exploring music from all over the world. Students also learn to read music and explore beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, tonality, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, articulation, style, and music background. Students apply the music skills they are learning while performing seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only
Spotlight on Music Grade 5ElectivesGet ready to travel the world through music as students explore and build foundational music skills with Spotlight on Music. This hands-on music course offers a variety of learning activities that include singing, dancing, virtual instruments, playing the recorder, listening maps, authentic sound recordings with famous past and present artists, and an iSong player that allows students to customize key signatures, tempo, and lyrical highlighting. Six units in the course are organized into three sections: Spotlight on Concepts, Spotlight on Music Reading, and Spotlight on Celebrations. Students learn about these musical elements: duration, pitch, design, tone color, expressive qualities, and cultural context, while exploring music from all over the world. Students also learn to read music and explore beat, meter, rhythm, melody, harmony, tonality, texture, form, dynamics, tempo, articulation, style, and music background. Students apply the music skills they are learning while performing seasonal and celebratory songs. Available on Online School platform only.

High School

English

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
American Literature (Core)Language ArtsIn this genre-based course, students sharpen their reading comprehension skills and analyze important themes in classic and modern works of American literature, including short stories, poetry, drama, and novels. Students refine their skills of written expression by writing memoirs, persuasive essays, research essays, workplace documentation, and more. They develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Literature: Students read short stories, poetry, drama, and novels, sharpening their reading comprehension skills and analyzing important themes in American literature. Language Skills: Students continue to work on their oral and written expression skills, writing a variety of essays, including memoirs, persuasive and research essays, and workplace documentation. Students plan, organize, and revise their essays in response to feedback. Prerequisite: English 1 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent)1
American Literature (Comprehensive)Language ArtsIn this course, students read and analyze works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Prerequisite: English 1 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent)1
American Literature (Honors)Language ArtsIn this course, students read and analyze works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Students enrolled in this challenging course also complete independent projects that deepen their understanding of the themes and ideas presented in the curriculum. Prerequisites: English 1 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Honors English Language and CompositionLanguage ArtsStudents learn to understand and analyze complex works by a variety of authors. They explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They also learn composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing. This continues with editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to academic, personal, and professional contexts. In this equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students prepare for the AP® exam. Prerequisites: English 1 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent)1
Honors English Literature and CompositionLanguage ArtsIn this course, the equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students are immersed in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and discussions. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analyses of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. Students prepare for the AP® exam. Prerequisites: English 1 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent) or American Literature Honors (or equivalent), and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
British and World Literature (Core)Language ArtsThis course engages students in selections from British and world literature from the ancient world through modern times. Students practice analytical writing and have opportunities for creative expression. Students also practice critical reading and writing test-taking skills. Literature: Students read short stories, poetry, drama, and novels, sharpening their reading comprehension skills and analyzing important themes. Language Skills: Students continue to work on their oral and written expression skills, writing a variety of essays, including expository, persuasive, and research essays, and workplace documentation. Students plan, organize, and revise their essays in response to feedback. Prerequisite: American Literature (Core) (or equivalent)1
British and World Literature (Comprehensive)Language ArtsStudents read selections from British and world literature and analyze the themes, styles, and structures of these texts. They also make thematic connections among diverse authors, periods, and settings. Students complete guided and independent writing assignments that refine their analytical skills. They have opportunities for creative expression in projects of their choice. Students also practice critical reading and writing test-taking skills. Prerequisite: American Literature (Comprehensive) (or equivalent)1
British and World Literature (Honors)Language ArtsStudents read selections from British and world literature and analyze the themes, styles, and structures of these texts. They also make thematic connections among diverse authors, periods, and settings. Students work independently on many of their analyses and engage in creative collaboration with their peers. Students also practice critical reading and writing test-taking skills. Prerequisites: American Literature Honors (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Creative WritingLanguage ArtsStudents create original essays, poems, and short stories in this course, which focuses on the fourstep process writing model. They read professionally written forms of creative writing as models and then integrate their impressions of these works with their personal life experiences as they compose their own writing projects. Students are encouraged to write about topics they find engaging as they practice writing on the following themes: narration, definition, process analysis, cause and effect, and comparison/contrast. The teacher supplies feedback that helps students learn how to improve their self-expression and self-editing skills. Prerequisite: None1
English 9 (Summit Curriculum)Language ArtsThis English 9 Summit course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 9. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations and participate in discussions with their peers. Prerequisite: Grade 8 Language Arts (or equivalent)1
English 9 Honors (Summit Curriculum)Language ArtsThis English 9 Honors Summit course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 9. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations, and participate in discussions with their peers. This course also includes an independent honors project each semester. Prerequisites: Grade 8 Language Arts (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
English 10 (Summit Curriculum)Language ArtsThis English 10 Summit course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 1. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations and participate in discussions with their peers. Prerequisite: English 9 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent)1
English 10 Honors (Summit Curriculum)Language ArtsThis English 10 Honors Summit course includes engaging and interactive instruction about reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language, with a focus on exploring a wide variety of genres and their elements. Students learn how to carefully read, interpret, and analyze literature and nonfiction works of cultural or historical significance appropriate to grade 1. Throughout the course, students practice narrative, informational, and argumentative writing. Students also develop and deliver presentations and participate in discussions with their peers. This course also includes an independent honors project each semester. Prerequisites: English 9 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
English Foundations I (Remediation)Language ArtsStudents build and reinforce foundational reading, writing, and basic academic skills typically found in third through fifth grade for which they have not achieved mastery. Through carefully paced, guided instruction and graduated reading levels, students improve reading comprehension and strategies, focusing on literacy development at the critical stage between decoding and making meaning from text. Instruction and practice in writing skills help students develop their composition skills in a variety of formats. If needed, students can continue their remediation of reading and writing skills with English Foundations II. Prerequisite: Teacher/school counselor recommendation1
English Foundations II (Remediation)Language ArtsStudents build and reinforce foundational reading, writing, and basic academic skills typically found in sixth through eighth grade, achieving the skills needed to undertake high school English courses with confidence. Struggling readers develop mastery in reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, and media literacy. Students build confidence in writing fundamentals by focusing on composition in a variety of formats, in addition to grammar, style, and media literacy. Prerequisite: Teacher/school counselor recommendation; English Foundations I is not required1
Grammar and CompositionLanguage ArtsThis refresher course helps students improve their understanding of grammar and usage basics and enhance their communication skills through writing exercises and discussions with their peers. Students start by completing a diagnostic writing assignment to identify strengths and areas for improvement. They receive step-by-step instruction on the writing process, follow activities to develop their grammar skills, and have multiple opportunities to practice formal and informal writing. Students use literature and expository pieces as models for their own writing. They participate in threaded online conversations with the teacher and their fellow students to discuss their writing, receive constructive feedback for revision, and comment on other students’ work. Throughout the course, rubrics help students remember what is expected of them and help them produce their best work. Available on PEAK platform only. Prerequisite: None1
JournalismLanguage ArtsStudents are introduced to the historical importance of journalism in America. They study the basic principles of print and online journalism as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing techniques as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students conduct interviews, research, write, and design their own publications. Prerequisite: None0.5
Public SpeakingLanguage ArtsStudents are introduced to public speaking as an important component of their academic, work, and social lives. They study public speaking occasions and develop skills as fair and critical listeners, or consumers, of spoken information and persuasion. Students study types of speeches (informative, persuasive, dramatic, and special occasion), read and listen to models of speeches, and prepare and present their own speeches to diverse audiences. Students learn to choose speaking topics and adapt them for specific audiences, to research and support their ideas, and to benefit from listener feedback. They study how to incorporate well-designed visual and multimedia aids in presentations and how to maintain a credible presence in the digital world. Students also learn about the ethics of public speaking and about techniques for managing communication anxiety. Prerequisite: None0.5

History & Social Sciences

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AnthropologyHistory and Social SciencesAnthropologists research the characteristics and origins of the cultural, social, and physical development of humans and consider why some cultures change and others come to an end. In this course, students are introduced to the five main branches of anthropology: physical, cultural, linguistic, social, and archeological. Through instruction and their own investigation and analysis, students explore these topics while considering their relationship to other social sciences such as history, geography, sociology, economics, political science, and psychology. Emulating professional anthropologists, students apply their knowledge and observational skills to the real-life study of cultures in the United States and around the world. Prerequisite: World History (or equivalent) recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite, but not required0.5
Honors Art HistoryHistory and Social SciencesAP® Art History is an introduction to major works of art and the concepts needed to understand them. This online course fosters in-depth, holistic understanding of the history of art from a global perspective, and builds understanding of the place of art within broader historical, cultural, religious, and political frameworks. The functions and effects of art are the main focus. This AP® Art History course is designed to be equivalent with a two-semester introductory college-level art history survey course. Prerequisite: None1
Honors MacroeconomicsHistory and Social SciencesThis course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. Students also examine how individuals and institutions are influenced by employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. Students prepare for the AP® exam. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation0.5
Honors MicroeconomicsHistory and Social SciencesThis course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students explore the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students learn why the same product can cost different amounts at different stores, in different cities, and at different times. Students also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and learn how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Lessons promote an understanding of the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in the economy. Students prepare for the AP® exam. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation0.5
Honors PsychologyHistory and Social SciencesThis course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students receive an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. They explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists, and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sensory functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Students prepare for the AP® exam. Prerequisites: Biology Honors (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation0.5
Honors U.S. Government and PoliticsHistory and Social SciencesIn this course, students explore the operations and structure of the U.S. government. Students evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes and learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. Students also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. Students prepare for the AP® exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history. Prerequisites: U.S. History Honors (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation0.5
Honors U.S. HistoryHistory and Social SciencesStudents explore and analyze the economic, political, and social transformation of the United States since the time of the first European encounters. Students are asked to master not only the wide array of factual information necessary to do well on the AP® exam, but also to practice skills of critical analysis of historical information and documents. Students read primary and secondary source materials and analyze problems presented by historians to gain insight into challenges of interpretation and the ways in which historical events have shaped American society and culture. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisites: Success in previous history course and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Honors World HistoryHistory and Social SciencesThis course spans the Neolithic Age to the present in a rigorous academic format organized by chronological periods and viewed through fundamental concepts and course themes. Students analyze the causes and processes of continuity and change across historical periods. Themes include human–environment interaction, cultures, expansion and conflict, political and social structures, and economic systems. In addition to mastering historical content, students cultivate historical thinking skills that involve crafting arguments based on evidence, identifying causation, comparing and supplying context for events and phenomenon, and developing historical interpretation. This course prepares students for the AP® World History exam. Prerequisites: Previous history course and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
CivicsHistory and Social SciencesCivics is the study of citizenship and government. This one-semester course provides students with a basic understanding of civic life, politics, and government, and a short history of government’s foundation and development in this country. Students learn how power and responsibility are shared and limited by government, the impact American politics has on world affairs, the place of law in the American constitutional system, and which rights the American government guarantees its citizens. Students also examine how the world is organized politically and how civic participation in the American political system compares to that in other societies around the world today. Prerequisite: None0.5
Contemporary World IssuesHistory and Social SciencesStudents analyze governments, economies, peoples, and cultures from around the world in this course. Instruction emphasizes the structures and policies of the United States and how they compare to other systems in the international community. Students apply critical thinking and research skills to examine current events and contemporary issues. Prerequisite: None1
EconomicsHistory and Social SciencesStudents are introduced to the basics of economic principles, and they learn the importance of understanding different economic systems. They also investigate how to think like an economist. Students explore different economic systems, including the American free enterprise system, and they analyze and interpret data to understand the laws of supply and demand. Students are also presented with economic applications in today’s world. From economics in the world of business, money, banking, and finance, students see how economics is applied both domestically and globally. Students also study how the government is involved in establishing economic stability in the American free enterprise system as well as how the U.S. economy has a global impact. Prerequisite: None0.5
GeographyHistory and Social SciencesThis course explores world geography on a region-by-region basis and covers a broad range of geographical perspectives. Each unit covers one continent or other major geographical region of the world: North America, Central America, South America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Cultures, Africa, India, and the Middle East. Students first learn about each region’s landforms, climate, and population. They then examine that region’s cultural, economic, and political institutions. Each unit is presented in a parallel format to facilitate interregional comparisons and allow students to see the similarities and differences between the regions more clearly. Prerequisite: None1
Modern U.S. History (Core)History and Social SciencesThis course is a full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the industrial revolution of the late nineteenth century to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize study, explore topics in-depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Prerequisite: World History or Modern World Studies (or equivalents)1
Modern U.S. History (Comprehensive)History and Social SciencesThis course is a full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Lessons help students organize their study, explore topics in-depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Prerequisite: World History or Modern World Studies (or equivalents)1
Modern U.S. History (Honors)History and Social SciencesThis course is a challenging full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the industrial revolution of the late nineteenth century to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Lessons help students organize study, explore topics in-depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice advanced skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Students complete independent projects each semester. Prerequisites: World History or Modern World Studies (or equivalents) and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Modern World Studies (Core)History and Social SciencesStudents trace the history of the world from approximately 1870 to the present. They begin with a look back at events leading up to 1914, including the Second Industrial Revolution and the imperialism that accompanied it. Their focus then shifts to the contemporary era, including two world wars, the Great Depression, and global Cold War tensions. Students examine both the staggering problems and astounding accomplishments of the twentieth century, with a focus on political and social history. Students also explore topics in physical and human geography, and investigate issues of concern in the contemporary world. Online lessons help students organize study, explore topics, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Prerequisite: World History (or equivalent)1
Modern World Studies (Comprehensive)History and Social SciencesIn this comprehensive course, students follow the history of the world from approximately 1870 to the present. They begin with a study of events leading up to 1914, including the Second Industrial Revolution and the imperialism that accompanied it. Their focus then shifts to the contemporary era, including two world wars, the Great Depression, and global Cold War tensions. Students examine both the staggering problems and astounding accomplishments of the twentieth century, with a focus on political and social history. Students also explore topics in physical and human geography, and investigate issues of concern in the contemporary world. Lessons help students organize study, explore topics, review in preparation for assessments, and practice sophisticated skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Prerequisite: World History (or equivalent)1
Modern World Studies (Honors)History and Social SciencesIn this advanced course, students investigate the history of the world from approximately 1870 to the present. They begin with an analysis of events leading up to 1914, including the Second Industrial Revolution and the imperialism that accompanied it. Their focus then shifts to the contemporary era, including two world wars, the Great Depression, and global Cold War tensions. Students undertake an in-depth examination of both the staggering problems and astounding accomplishments of the twentieth century, with a focus on political and social history. Students also explore advanced topics in physical and human geography, and investigate issues of concern in the contemporary world. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting research. Students complete independent projects each semester. Prerequisites: World History (or equivalent), success in previous social studies course, and teacher/ school counselor recommendation1
PsychologyHistory and Social SciencesIn this one-semester course, students investigate why human beings think and act the way they do. This is an introductory course that broadly covers several areas of psychology. Instructional material presents theories and current research for students to critically evaluate and understand. Each unit introduces terminology, theories, and research that are critical to the understanding of psychology and includes tutorials and interactive exercises. Students learn how to define and use key terms of psychology and how to apply psychological principles to their own lives. Units include Methods of Study, Biological Basis for Behavior, Learning and Memory, Development and Individual Differences, and Psychological Disorders. Prerequisite: Interest in and a willingness to critically explore the many different areas presented in an introductory course about behavior0.5
U.S. and Global Economics (Core)History and Social SciencesThis course in economic principles uses real-world simulations to teach the issues faced by producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers in the United States and around the world. Topics include markets; supply and demand; theories of early economic thinkers; theories of value; money; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; and other fundamental features of capitalism. A survey of current issues in American and global markets rounds out the course. Prerequisite: U.S. Government and Politics (Core) (or equivalent) is recommended, but not required0.5
U.S. and Global Economics (Comprehensive)History and Social SciencesIn this course on economic principles, students explore choices they face as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers. Students apply what they learn to real-world simulation problems. Topics of study include markets from historic and contemporary perspectives; supply and demand; theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; money (what it is, how it evolved, the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve); Keynesian economics; how capitalism functions, focusing on productivity, wages, investment, and growth; issues of capitalism such as unemployment, inflation, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in such areas as China, Europe, and the Middle East. Prerequisite: U.S. Government and Politics (Comprehensive) (or equivalent) is recommended, but not required0.5
U.S. Government and Politics (Core)History and Social SciencesThis course uses the perspective of political institutions to explore government history, organization, and functions. Students encounter the political culture of our country from the Declaration of Independence to the present day, gaining insight into the challenges faced by presidents, members of Congress, and other political participants. The course also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court. Students learn to use primary historical documents as evidence in evaluating past events and government functions. Prerequisite: U.S. History (Core) (or equivalent) is recommended, but not required0.5
U.S. Government and Politics (Comprehensive)History and Social SciencesThis course studies the history, organization, and functions of the United States government. Beginning with the Declaration of Independence and continuing through to the present day, students explore the relationship between individual Americans and our governing bodies. Students take a close look at the political culture of our country and gain insight into the challenges faced by citizens, elected government officials, political activists, and others. Students also learn about the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court, and discuss their own views on current political issues. Prerequisite: U.S. History (Comprehensive) (or equivalent) is recommended, but not required0.5
U.S. History (Core)History and Social SciencesThis course is a full-year survey that provides students with a view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize their study, explore topics, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating timelines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Prerequisite: Middle school World History (or equivalent)1
U.S. History (Comprehensive)History and Social SciencesThis course is a full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Lessons help students organize their study, explore topics, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Prerequisite: World History or Modern World Studies (or equivalents)1
U.S. History (Honors)History and Social SciencesThis course is a challenging full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Lessons help students organize their study, explore topics in-depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice advanced skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating time lines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Students complete independent projects each semester. Prerequisites: World History or Modern World Studies (or equivalents), success in previous history course, and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
World History (Core)History and Social SciencesIn this survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus on the key developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story. Students analyze primary sources and maps, create time lines, and complete other projects—practicing historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history. Prerequisite: Middle school social studies1
World History (Comprehensive)History and Social SciencesIn this comprehensive survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus in-depth on the developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story. Students are challenged to consider topics in-depth as they analyze primary sources and maps, create time lines, and complete other projects—practicing historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history. Prerequisite: Middle school social studies1
World History (Honors)History and Social SciencesIn this challenging survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus in-depth on the developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story. Students are challenged to consider topics in-depth as they analyze primary sources and maps, create time lines, and complete other projects—practicing advanced historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history. Students complete an independent honors project each semester. Prerequisites: Middle school social studies and teacher/school counselor recommendation1

Math

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
Honors Calculus ABMathThis course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. Students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Students also learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Students prepare for the AP exam.1
Honors Calculus BCMathThis course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course. In this course, students study functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. Students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and apply mathematical reasoning to realworld models. Students also learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Students prepare for the AP exam.1
Honors StatisticsMathThis course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Statistics—the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties—plays an important role in many fields. Students collect, analyze, graph, and interpret real-world data. They learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research. Students prepare for the AP exam.1
Algebra 1 (Credit Recovery)MathAlgebra 1 leads students from their proficiency and understanding of numbers and operations into the mathematics of algebraic thinking. Building on pre-algebra skills developed in middle school, students deepen their understanding of linear expressions and equations, linear inequalities, and coordinate graphing. They then explore and learn about the function concept, radical expressions, exponential expressions and functions, quadratic functions, systems of equations, factoring and roots of equations, and basic statistical analysis.1
Algebra 1 (Summit Curriculum)MathThis Algebra 1 Summit course is intended to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Because it is built to follow revised middle school math courses, the course covers slightly different ground than previous versions of algebra. In this course, students deepen their understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other. Students also apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. The course also covers analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. Prerequisite: Math 8 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent)1
Algebra 1 Honors (Summit Curriculum)MathThis Algebra 1 Honors Summit course is intended to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. In this course, students deepen their understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other. Students also apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. The course also covers analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. This course also includes an independent honors project each semester.1
Algebra 2 (Credit Recovery)MathAlgebra 2 builds on the mathematical proficiency and reasoning skills developed in Algebra 1 and Geometry to lead students into advanced algebraic work. The course emphasizes the concept of functions throughout. Sandwiched between short forays into probability and statistics is a thorough treatment of linear, quadratic, higher-degree polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, with emphasis on analysis, problem solving, and graphing. Toward the end of the course, an introduction to sequences and series is presented in preparation for future work in mathematics.1
Algebra 2 (Summit Curriculum)MathIn this Algebra 2 Summit course, students build on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, and extend their repertoire to include polynomial, rational, radical, and trigonometric functions. Students also expand their ability to model situations and solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The course covers sequences and series, probability distributions, and more advanced data analysis techniques. Prerequisites: Algebra 1 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent), and Geometry (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent), and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Algebra 2 Honors (Summit Curriculum)MathThis Algebra 2 Honors Summit course, students build on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, and extend their repertoire to include polynomial, rational, radical, and trigonometric functions. Students also expand their ability to model situations and solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The course covers sequences and series, probability distributions, and more advanced data analysis techniques. This course also includes an independent honors project each semester.1
Calculus (Comprehensive)MathThis course provides a comprehensive survey of differential and integral calculus concepts, including limits, derivative and integral computation, linearization, Riemann sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and differential equations. Content is presented across ten units and covers various applications, including graph analysis, linear motion, average value, area, volume, and growth and decay models. In this course, students use an online textbook that supplements the instruction they receive and provides additional opportunities to practice using the content they’ve learned. Students use an embedded graphing calculator applet (GCalc) for their work on this course; the software for the applet can be downloaded at no charge.1
Consumer Math (Core)MathIn Consumer Math, students study and review arithmetic skills they can apply in their personal lives and in their future careers. The first semester of the course begins with a focus on occupational topics; it includes details on jobs, wages, deductions, taxes, insurance, recreation and spending, and transportation. In the second semester, students learn about personal finances, checking and savings accounts, loans and buying on credit, automobile expenses, and housing expenses. Narrated slideshows help illustrate some of the more difficult content. Throughout the course, students participate in online discussions with each other and their teacher.1
Continuing Algebra (Core)MathThis is the second course in a two-year algebra sequence. In this course, students build on what they learned in Developmental Algebra to complete their knowledge of all topics associated with a deep understanding of Algebra I. They learn about relations and functions, radicals and radical expressions, polynomials and their graphs, factoring expressions and using factoring to solve equations, solving quadratics, rational expressions, and logic and reasoning.1
Developmental Algebra (Core)MathThis is the first course in a two-year algebra sequence that concludes with Continuing Algebra. In this course, students begin to explore the tools and principles of algebra. Students learn to identify the structure and properties of the real number system, complete operations with integers and other rational numbers, work with square roots and irrational numbers, graph linear equations, solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, and solve systems of linear equations. Sophisticated virtual manipulatives and online graphing tools help students visualize algebraic relationships. Developmental Algebra covers fewer topics than a one-year algebra course, providing students with more time to learn and practice key concepts and skills. After completing Developmental Algebra, students are prepared to take Continuing Algebra.1
Geometry (Credit Recovery)MathGeometry combines mathematical reasoning and proof with an extension of students’ algebraic development in geometric contexts. The course focuses primarily on two-dimensional shapes in the Euclidean plane. Starting with segments and angles, students develop understanding of and work through problems and proofs involving congruence, similarity, parallel and perpendicular lines, quadrilaterals, and circles. Toward the end of the course, time is also spent extending the treatment of triangles into basic trigonometry concepts and providing students with a detailed taste of analytic geometry by developing and using the equation of a circle in the coordinate plane.1
Geometry (Summit Curriculum)MathThis Geometry Summit course builds on the geometry covered in middle school to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen students’ ability to explain geometric relationships, moving toward formal mathematical arguments. Specific topics include similarity and congruence, analytic geometry, circles, the Pythagorean theorem, right triangle trigonometry, analysis of threedimensional objects, conic sections, and geometric modeling. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent)1
Geometry Honors (Summit Curriculum)MathThis Geometry Honors Summit course builds on the geometry covered in middle school to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen students’ ability to explain geometric relationships, moving toward formal mathematical arguments. Specific topics include similarity and congruence, analytic geometry, circles, the Pythagorean theorem, right triangle trigonometry, analysis of three-dimensional objects, conic sections, and geometric modeling. This course also includes an independent honors project each semester.1
Integrated Math (Comprehensive)MathThis course helps students develop mathematical skills that enable them to solve problems and use reason and logic in math courses. Integrated Math gives the main overview of the many mathematical disciplines; topics include number sense, operations, algebraic sense, introduction to probability, geometric figures, geometric movement, measurement, and a more in-depth look at probability (including permutations and combination). Content is expressed in everyday mathematical language and notations to help students learn to apply the skills in a variety of applications. Instruction is supplemented with self-check quizzes, audio tutorials, web quests, and interactive games that engage students in the content they are learning.1
Integrated Mathematics I (Comprehensive)MathThis first-year high school integrated math course focuses on linear and simple exponential models. The course contrasts linear behavior with exponential behavior, and uses both linear and simple exponential equations as models. Students learn about and work extensively with functions—analyzing function properties and behavior, creating new functions from known functions, and applying functions to various continuous and discrete situations. The statistics in the course focus on modeling. Geometry topics covered in the course include constructions, transformations, similarity, and congruence—and students use the Pythagorean theorem in analytic geometry contexts.1
Integrated Mathematics II (Comprehensive)MathIntegrated Mathematics II, a second-year high school math course, focuses on extending the number system to include irrational and complex numbers as well as computation with quadratic polynomials. The course continues with quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including making comparisons to their linear and exponential counterparts, covered in Integrated Mathematics I. The course also introduces conditional probability as a way to make better decisions when given limited information. Geometry topics covered in the course include similarity, right triangle trigonometry, and volume. Students use the tools of analytic geometry, synthesizing algebra, and geometry concepts to describe circles and parabolas in the coordinate plane.1
Integrated Mathematics III (Comprehensive)MathIn this third-year high school math course, students encounter unified instruction reviewing and expanding all previous high school math topics. First, they extend their work on polynomials beyond quadratics to graphing, problem solving, and working with rational expressions. Next, they use statistical and probability tools, such as the standard normal distribution, to understand data. Students make inferences using simulations, experiments, and surveys. In geometry, they extend trigonometric concepts to general triangles and use trigonometric functions to model periodic processes. Finally, students substantially use mathematical modeling by making use of well developed skills with various mathematical tools.1
Math Foundations IMathStudents build and reinforce foundational math skills typically found in third through fifth grade for which they have not achieved mastery. They progress through carefully paced, guided instruction and engaging interactive practice. If needed, students can move on to Math Foundations II (addressing skills typically found in sixth through eighth grade) to further develop the computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school math courses with confidence.1
Math Foundations IIMathStudents build and reinforce foundational math skills typically found in sixth through eighth grade, achieving the computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school math courses with confidence. Carefully paced, guided instruction is accompanied by interactive practice that is engaging and accessible. This course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as a bridge to high school.1
Personal FinanceMathIn this introductory finance course, students learn basic principles of economics and best practices for managing their own finances. Students learn core skills in creating budgets, developing long-term financial plans to meet their goals, and making responsible choices about income and expenses. They gain a deeper understanding of capitalism and other systems so they can better understand their role in the economy of society.0.5
Practical Math (Core)MathIn this course, students use math to solve real-world problems—and real-world problems to solidify their understanding of key mathematical topics. Data analysis, math modeling, and personal finance are key themes in this course. Specific topics of study include statistics, probability, graphs of statistical data, regression, finance, and budgeting. In addition, students learn how to use several mathematical models involving algebra and geometry to solve problems. Proficiency is measured through frequent online and offline assessments as well as class participation. Units focused on projects also allow students to apply and extend their math skills in real-world cases.1
Pre-Algebra (Comprehensive)MathIn this course, students take a broader look at computational and problem-solving skills while learning the language of algebra. Students translate word phrases and sentences into mathematical expressions; analyze geometric figures; solve problems involving percentages, ratios, and proportions; graph different kinds of equations and inequalities; calculate statistical measures and probabilities; apply the Pythagorean theorem; and explain strategies for solving real-world problems. Lessons provide demonstrations of key concepts as well as interactive problems with contextual feedback. A textbook supplements the online material.1
Pre-Algebra (Core)MathIn this course, students learn computational and problem-solving skills and the language of algebra. Students translate word phrases and sentences into mathematical expressions; analyze geometric figures; solve problems involving percentages, ratios, and proportions; graph different kinds of equations and inequalities; calculate statistical measures and probabilities; apply the Pythagorean theorem; and explain strategies for solving real-world problems. The online textbook provides students with a ready reference and explanations that supplement the online material. Lessons provide demonstrations of concepts as well as interactive problems with contextual feedback.1
Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (Comprehensive)MathPre-calculus weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections in the first semester. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers. Cross-curricular connections are made throughout the course to calculus, art, history, and a variety of other fields related to mathematics.1
Probability and Statistics (Comprehensive)MathStudents learn counting methods, probability, descriptive statistics, graphs of data, the normal curve, statistical inference, and linear regression. Proficiency is measured through frequent online and offline assessments as well as asynchronous discussions. Problem-solving activities provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their skills in real-world situations.0.5

Science

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AP® BiologyScienceThis course guides students to a deeper understanding of biological concepts, including the diversity and unity of life, energy and the processes of life, homeostasis, and genetics. Students learn about regulation, communication, and signaling in living organisms, and interactions of biological systems. Students carry out a number of learning activities, including readings, interactive exercises, extension activities, hands-on and virtual laboratory experiments, and practice assessments. These activities are designed to help students gain an understanding of the science process and critical-thinking skills necessary to answer questions on the AP® Biology exam. Prerequisites: Biology Honors, Chemistry Honors, Algebra 1 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalents), and teacher/school counselor recommendation required; success in Algebra 2 Honors (Summit Curriculum) highly recommended1
AP® ChemistryScienceStudents solve chemical problems by using mathematical formulation principles and chemical calculations in addition to laboratory experiments. They build on their general understanding of chemical principles and engage in a more in-depth study of the nature and reactivity of matter. Students focus on the structure of atoms, molecules, and ions, and then go on to analyze the relationship between molecular structure and chemical and physical properties. To investigate this relationship, students examine the molecular composition of common substances and learn to transform them through chemical reactions with increasingly predictable outcomes. Students prepare for the AP® exam. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisites: Chemistry Honors, Algebra 2 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalents), and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
AP® Environmental ScienceScienceAP® Environmental Science is equivalent to an introductory college-level environmental science course and is designed to prepare students for the College Board AP® Environmental Science Exam. AP® Environmental Science is interdisciplinary, incorporating various topics from different disciplines and areas of science. Prerequisites: Students must have taken at least one year of high school algebra and successfully completed a high school earth science1
Biology (Core)ScienceIn this course, students focus on the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of online lessons, including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and laboratory experiments students can conduct at home. Prerequisite: Middle school Life Science (or equivalent)1
Biology (Comprehensive)ScienceIn this comprehensive course, students investigate the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of indepth online lessons, including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative explorations, and laboratory experiments students can conduct at home. Prerequisite: Middle school Life Science (or equivalent)1
Biology (Honors)ScienceThis course provides students with a challenging honors-level biology curriculum, focusing on the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of advanced online lessons, including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative explorations, and laboratory experiments students can conduct at home. Honors activities include debates, research papers, and extended laboratories. Prerequisites: Middle school Life Science (or equivalent), success in previous science course, and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Chemistry (Core)ScienceThis course surveys all key areas of chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course includes direct online instruction, laboratories, and related assessments, used with a problem-solving book. Prerequisites: Middle school Physical Science or Physical Science (Core) and a satisfactory grasp of algebra basics, evidenced by success in Algebra 1 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalents)1
Chemistry (Comprehensive)ScienceThis comprehensive course gives students a solid basis to move on to future studies. The course provides an in-depth survey of all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course includes direct online instruction, laboratories, and related assessments, used with an online problem-solving book. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of either middle school Physical Science or Physical Science (Core) (or equivalents), and a solid grasp of algebra basics, evidenced by success in Algebra 1 (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalent)1
Chemistry (Honors)ScienceThis advanced course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses. The challenging course surveys all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry, enhanced with challenging model problems and assessments. Students complete community-based written research projects, treat aspects of chemistry that require individual research and reporting, and participate in online threaded discussions. Prerequisites: Success in previous science course, Algebra 1 (Summit Curriculum), Algebra 1 Honors (Summit Curriculum) (or equivalents), and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Earth Science (Core)ScienceThis course provides students with a solid earth science curriculum, focusing on geology, oceanography, astronomy, weather, and climate. The program consists of online lessons, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and laboratories students can conduct at home. The course provides a base for further studies in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy, and gives practical experience in implementing scientific methods. Prerequisite: Middle school Earth Science (or equivalent)1
Earth Science (Comprehensive)ScienceThis course provides students with a comprehensive earth science curriculum, focusing on geology, oceanography, astronomy, weather, and climate. The program consists of in-depth online lessons, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and laboratories students can conduct at home. The course prepares students for further studies in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy courses, and gives them practical experience in implementing scientific methods. Prerequisite: Middle school Earth Science (or equivalent)1
Earth Science (Honors)ScienceThis challenging course provides students with an honors-level earth science curriculum, focusing on geology, oceanography, astronomy, weather, and climate. The program consists of online lessons, an associated reference book, collaborative activities, and laboratories students can conduct at home. The course prepares students for advanced studies in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy courses, and gives them more sophisticated experience in implementing scientific methods. Additional honors assignments include debates, research papers, and extended collaborative laboratories. Prerequisites: Middle school Earth Science (or equivalent), middle school Physical Science (or equivalent) is recommended, and teacher/school counselor recommendation1
Environmental ScienceScienceThis course surveys key topic areas, including the application of scientific process to environmental analysis; ecology; energy flow; ecological structures; earth systems; and atmospheric, land, and water science. Topics also include the management of natural resources and analysis of private and governmental decisions involving the environment. Students explore actual case studies and conduct five hands-on, unit-long research activities, learning that political and private decisions about the environment and the use of resources require accurate application of scientific processes, including proper data collection and responsible conclusions. Prerequisites: Success in previous high school science course and teacher/counselor recommendation0.5
Forensic ScienceScienceThis course surveys key topics in forensic science, including the application of the scientific process to forensic analysis, procedures and principles of crime scene investigation, physical and trace evidence, and the law and courtroom procedures from the perspective of the forensic scientist. Through online lessons, labs, and analysis of fictional crime scenarios, students learn about forensic tools, technical resources, forming and testing hypotheses, proper data collection, and responsible conclusions. Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least two years of high school science, including Biology (Comprehensive) (or equivalent); Chemistry (Comprehensive) (or equivalent) is highly recommended0.5
Introduction to Renewable TechnologiesScienceWith concerns about climate change and growing populations’ effects on traditional energy supplies, scientists, governments, and societies are increasingly turning to renewable and innovative energy sources. In the Introduction to Renewable Technologies course, students learn all about the cuttingedge field of renewable energy and the exciting new technologies that are making it possible. They explore new ways of generating energy and storing that energy, from biofuels to high-capacity batteries and smart electrical grids. Students also learn more about the environmental and social effects of renewable technologies and examine how people’s energy decisions influence policies. Available on Online School platform only. Prerequisite: None0.5
Physical Science (Core)ScienceStudents explore the relationship between matter and energy by investigating force and motion, the structure of atoms, the structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions, and the interactions of energy and matter. Students develop skills in measuring, solving problems, using laboratory apparatuses, following safety procedures, and adhering to experimental procedures. Students focus on inquiry-based learning with laboratory investigations and experiences. Prerequisite: Middle school Physical Science (or equivalent)1
Physics (Comprehensive)ScienceThis course provides a comprehensive survey of all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. The course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses later in their academic careers. The program consists of online instruction, laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 (Summit Curriculum) and Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents); Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry strongly recommended as a prerequisite, but this course may instead be taken concurrently with Physics (Comprehensive)1

Foreign Language

For credit foreign language courses are NCAA approved using the Middlebury curriculum listed here.

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credit Value
HS Spanish IForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Spanish-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world. High School Spanish I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Spanish I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.1
HS Spanish IIForeign LanguageHigh School Spanish II is the second level of high school Spanish designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Spanish.1
HS French IForeign LanguageHigh School French I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to French-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Francophone world. High School French I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School French I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.1
HS French IIForeign LanguageHigh School French II is the second level of high school French designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate French.1
HS German IForeign LanguageHigh School German I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to German-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the German-speaking world. High School German I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School German I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.1
HS German IIForeign LanguageHigh School German II is the second level of high school German designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate German.1
HS Chinese IForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Chinese-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Chinese-speaking world. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. High School Chinese I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Chinese I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.1
HS Chinese IIForeign LanguageHigh School Chinese II is the second level of high school Chinese designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus and students are expected to learn several characters in each unit; however, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in overall comprehension. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, instruction is almost entirely in Chinese. High School Chinese II is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Chinese.1
HS Latin IForeign LanguageSince mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1
HS Latin IIForeign LanguageStudents continue with their study of Latin through ancient, timeh honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. The emphasis is on reading Latin through engaging with myths from the ancient world which are presented in Latin. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand and use common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).1
ASL101- Beginning ASLAmerican Sign LanguageTen dialogs introduce over 200 new ASL signs. The dialogs in our ASL beginner course cover common phrases for greeting and departing such as "What’s up" and "See you later," expressing one’s feelings, talking about ASL, and going to a restaurant and other places. Many common ASL sentence structures are introduced during our ASL beginner course including those associated with asking questions, simple sentences, setting up the topic and following with a comment, and using negative signs. Information about the lives of people in the Deaf community is presented in ten segments that cover a look at a typical Deaf club, national organizations of the Deaf, Deaf sport, sign language interpreters, regional variations in ASL signs, closed captioning, and a joke that is popular in the Deaf community.
ASL102- Basic ASLAmerican Sign LanguageTen dialogs introduce over 200 new ASL signs. The dialogs cover common phrases used to talk about the family and relatives, terminology popular in the Deaf community, and common means of communicating with a Deaf person including the use of a TTY which allows Deaf people to have conversations over a phone line. The basic ASL course dialogs cover a wide range of ASL sentence structures that will help beginning signers communicate more comfortably in ASL. Information about the lives of people in the Deaf community is presented in each of the ten lessons of our basic ASL course. Topics covered include Deaf people from different countries communicating in sign language with one another, truths and misconceptions about lipreading, hearing loss, strategies Deaf people use to get someone’s attention, closed captioning in theaters, hearing dogs, how parts of a sign can be altered so that the meaning of a sign changes, and a popular Deaf joke.
ASL103- Intermediate ASLAmerican Sign LanguageTen dialogs introduce over 200 new ASL signs. The intermediate ASL dialogs touch upon motivation for learning ASL, occupations, ordering food in a restaurant, and shopping. The internediate ASL lessons illustrate more ways in which a variety of ASL sentence structures can be used to form conversational sentences. Insights into the lives of people in the Deaf community is presented in each of the ten lessons and include topics about using your new found ASL skills in a conversation with a Deaf person, the different meanings that an ASL sign might have, varying the meaning of an ASL sign by changes in sign movement and facial expressions, reasons that senior citizens should learn to sign, an age-old Deaf joke popular amongst the younger generation, a look at how Deaf people stayed in touch with one another in the days before TTY and email communication, and behaviors that indicate a person is becoming deaf.
ASL104-Advanced ASLAmerican Sign LanguageTen dialogs introduce over 200 new ASL signs in our advanced ASL course. The dialogs look at conversations that take place around the house and school, common phrases associated with talking about the weather and sports, and end with two lessons devoted to talking about ASL. In addition, there is one advanced ASL lesson that introduces the ASL linguistic feature known as classifiers. They illustrate more ways in which a variety of ASL sentence structures can be used to form conversational sentences. Further fascinating insights into the lives of people in the Deaf community are presented in each of the ten lessons and this time with topics relating to rationale for visual applause, the creation of name signs, the varied use of the directional verb-sign LOOK-at, an association for Deaf and hearing people, the importance of eye movements when signing ASL, the relationship of signing to intellectual development in babies, rules for sports in the Deaf community, and personal alert systems.

Electives

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
2D AnimationElectiveIn the 2D animation course, students learn to create movement in a two-dimensional artistic space. They learn to conceptualize and bring their animation dreams to life using a variety of software and design programs. During the course, students design, define, and complete a variety of digital design projects, including creating their own website. Learning about 2D Animation could be a first step toward a career in technology and animation.0..5
3D ModelingElectiveThis course provides a good introduction to the fast-growing fields of technology and design, including virtual reality, video game design, marketing, television and motion pictures, and digital imaging. In 3D Modeling, students gain a deeper understanding of graphic design and illustration as they use 3D animation software to create virtual three-dimensional design projects. The course helps students develop the drawing, photography, and 3D construction skills needed to navigate within a 3D digital modeling workspace while rendering 3D models.0.5
A+ Computer Management IElectiveA Plus Computer Management Levels 1 and 2 provide a comprehensive introduction to managing and maintaining computer hardware and software. The course closely integrates the CompTIA A+ Exam objectives to prepare students for the 220-801 and 220-802 certification exams. Students will learn about current technology, techniques, and industry standards in the dynamic, fast-paced field of PC repair. This course prepares students for success as a professional PC repair technician. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
A+ Computer Management II with A+ Certification PreparationElectiveA Plus Computer Management Levels 1 and 2 provide a comprehensive introduction to managing and maintaining computer hardware and software. The course closely integrates the CompTIA A+ Exam objectives to prepare students for the 220-801 and 220-802 certification exams. Students will learn about current technology, techniques, and industry standards in the dynamic, fast-paced field of PC repair. This course prepares students for success as a professional PC repair technician. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Achieving Your Career and College GoalsElectiveStudents explore their options for life after high school and implement plans to achieve their goals. They identify their aptitudes, skills, and preferences, and explore a wide range of potential careers. They investigate the training and education required for the career of their choice, and create a plan to be sure that their work in high school is preparing them for the next step. They also receive practical experience in essential skills such as searching and applying for college, securing financial aid, writing a resume and cover letter, and interviewing for a job. This course is geared toward 11th and 12th graders.0.5
Adobe Dreamweaver with Adobe Certification PreparationElectiveThis course helps students master the industry-standard web development software by emphasizing all aspects of Dreamweaver, such as its interface, features, and functionality. The course includes studies to help students hone their skills and appreciate their professional relevance. The course explores cutting-edge web standards and design trends that can serve them well throughout their careers. At the end of this course, students will be prepared for the Adobe Certified Associate certification exam. Adobe Dreamweaver is required for this course. Students/Teachers can purchase an educational version of Creative Cloud (which includes Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver) for $19.99/mo here: http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/buy/students/checkout.html0.5
Adobe Illustrator with Adobe Certification PreparationElectiveThis course provides students in-depth exploration in all areas of Adobe Illustrator. Beginning with fundamental concepts and progressing to the software’s full set of features, this course allows students to build a portfolio by completing projects that explore and express their unique creative talents. At the end of this course, students will be prepared for the Adobe Certified Associate certification exam. Adobe Illustrator is required for this course. Students/Teachers can purchase an educational version of Creative Cloud (which includes Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver) for $19.99/mo here: http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/buy/students/checkout.html0.5
Adobe InDesign with Adobe Certification PreparationElectiveThis course provides students with an in-depth exploration of Adobe InDesign, the industry standard for page layout software. This course covers fundamental concepts, starting with the workspace, and proceeds logically and intuitively to more advanced topics. Students will learn how to work in InDesign using either Mac or PC platforms, and the course includes extensive coverage of Creative Cloud features. At the end of this course, students will be prepared for the Adobe Certified Associate certification exam. Adobe InDesign is required for this course. Students/Teachers can purchase an educational version of Creative Cloud (which includes Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver) for $19.99/mo here: http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/buy/students/checkout.html0.5
Adobe Photoshop with Adobe Certification PreparationElectiveThis course provides a solid foundation for students to learn cutting edge technology for sophisticated digital editing. Students will progress from basic to advanced Photoshop techniques and learn not only the how but also the why behind each Photoshop tool to help students excel at design as well as master the software. At the end of this course, students will be prepared for the Adobe Certified Associate certification exam. Adobe Photoshop is required for this course. Students/Teachers can purchase an educational version of Creative Cloud (which includes Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Dreamweaver) for $19.99/mo here: http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/buy/students/checkout.html0.5
Advertising and Sales PromotionElectiveThis course exposes students to methods and techniques businesses use to advertise their products and services. Topics include financing promotional activities, technical skills used by marketers, the components of an effective promotional mix, and personal selling techniques. In addition to key concepts of advertising, students take a closer look at careers in advertising, the skills needed to work in this industry, and the role of advertising in the twenty-first century. To apply the knowledge they have gained, students complete a capstone project in which they develop a promotional plan.1
Agriscience IIElectiveIn Agrisciences II, students will build on your existing knowledge of plant and animal science and delve deeper into important areas such as soil science and weed management. Students will also explore research on plant and animal diseases as well as the insects and other pests that can impact agricultural enterprises and natural resources.1
Anatomy and Physiology IElectiveAnatomy and Physiology Levels 1 and 2 provide a introduction to the basics required for the study of the human body and how it functions. Students will receive a general introduction to life functions, the terminology, and phonetic pronunciations used to describe body parts and their locations as well as an overall review of human development and body processes. This course also includes Infection Control and Standard Precautions, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining health and safety in the health care work environment as well as highlights the latest practices and protocols. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Anatomy and Physiology IIElectiveAnatomy and Physiology Levels 1 and 2 provide a introduction to the basics required for the study of the human body and how it functions. Students will receive a general introduction to life functions, the terminology, and phonetic pronunciations used to describe body parts and their locations as well as an overall review of human development and body processes. This course also includes Infection Control and Standard Precautions, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining health and safety in the health care work environment as well as highlights the latest practices and protocols. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
ArchaeologyElectiveGeorge Santayana once said, those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. The field of archaeology helps us better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped shape our modern world. This course focuses on the techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Finally, students learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.0.5
Art in World CulturesElectiveStudents will learn about some of the greatest artists while also creating art of their own, including digital art. The course explores the basic principles and elements of art, how to critique art, and how to examine some of the traditional art of the Americas, Africa, and Oceania in addition to the development of Western art.0.5
AstronomyElectiveThis course introduces students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.0.5
Audio EngineeringElectiveIn this introductory course, students learn about the physics of sound and the history of recording technologies. They learn about the four stages of professional music recording projects: recording, editing, mixing, and mastering. Using Audacity, an open-source recording and mixing program, they practice the techniques used by sound engineers to produce multitrack recordings. Through a series of engaging hands-on projects, they learn the fundamental concepts of audio engineering.0.5
BiotechnologyElectiveIn this course, students will explore the history of biotechnology, including early attempts at food preservation, the development of antibiotics, and changes to food crops around the world. Students will also learn more about some of the challenges of biotechnology such as the growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and questions about the safety of commercially produced genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Finally, students will research new biotechnologies and how they are changing the world we live in.0.5
Business and Healthcare ExplorationsElectiveThis course is designed as an exploration of two career clusters. Students will get an introduction to these fields so that they can better assess which pathway to pursue. In this course, students explore basic concepts in the broad areas of business and health care as well as career options in each area. In addition to studying concepts of entrepreneurship, accounting, and marketing, students explore these concepts on scales that range from a single person to nations. The second part of this course introduces students to the various disciplines within the health sciences, including toxicology, clinical medicine, and biotechnology. Students explore the importance of diagnostics and research in the identification and treatment of diseases.0.5
C++ ProgrammingElectiveThis course teaches students to use problem-solving skills involving full-code examples to demonstrate how and why to apply programming concepts while using C Plus Plus. Programming exercises strengthen student understanding of program design. Students will walk through the stages of Input, Output, Problem Analysis, and Algorithm Design to illustrate key concepts.0.5
Careers in Criminal JusticeElectiveIn this course, students will explore different areas of the criminal justice system, including the trial process, the juvenile justice system, and the correctional system. Careers in each area will be explored, and students will learn more about the expectations and training required for various career options in the criminal justice field.0.5
Computer FundamentalsElectiveIn this introductory course, students will become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer, including the internal hardware, the operating system, and software applications. Students will gain practice in using key applications, such as word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation software, as well as understand social and ethical issues around the Internet, information, and security. This is a two-semester course package. In the first semester, the focus is on the fundamentals, learning and using the applications, and understanding the basic roles and responsibilities of the software, hardware, and operating system. In the second semester, the focus is on gathering and analyzing data, and using the right tools and methods to collect and present data. This course should not be taken if the student has already completed Computer Literacy.1
Computer LiteracyElectiveIn this introductory course, students become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer, including the internal hardware, operating system, and software applications. Students gain practice in using key applications, such as word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software, as well as understand social and ethical issues around the Internet, information, and security. In the first part of the course, the focus is on the fundamentals: learning and using the applications, and understanding the basic roles and responsibilities of the software, hardware, and operating system. In the second part, the focus is on gathering and analyzing data, and using the right tools and methods to collect and present data.0.5
Computer ScienceElectiveThis course introduces students to computer science concepts such as computer architecture, networks, and the Internet. Students use object-oriented programming, event-driven processes, modular computer programming, and data manipulation algorithms to produce finished software programs. They use the design process to create many programs by determining specifications, designing the software, and testing and improving the product until it meets the specifications. By the end of this course, students have a solid foundation for further study in this subject.0.5
CosmetologyElectiveStudents will explore career options in the field of cosmetology. Research into some of the common techniques used in caring for hair, nails, and skin in salons, spas, and other cosmetology-related businesses will also be presented.0.5
CriminologyElectiveThis course introduces students to the field of criminology, the study of crime. Students look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological perspectives; explore the categories and social consequences of crime; and investigate how the criminal justice system handles criminals and their misdeeds. The course explores some key questions: Why do some individuals commit crimes while others do not? What aspects of culture and society promote crime? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors—from arrest to punishment—help shape the criminal case process?0.5
Dental Assisting IElectiveThis course teaches basic and advanced Dental Assisting skills. Students learn about leading dental practices/procedures, equipment, and patient safety standards. Students engage in dental assisting activities such as dental charting, tray setup, radiograph mounting, pathology identification, and taking vital signs.0.5
Dental Assisting IIElectiveThis is the second semester of the Dental Assisting. In this course students continue to learn basic and advanced dental assisting skills. Students learn about leading dental practices/procedures, equipment, and patient safety standards. Students engage in dental assisting activities such as dental charting, tray setup, radiograph mounting, pathology identification, and taking vital signs.0.5
Dental Assisting IIIElectiveThis is the third semester of the Dental Assisting. In this course students continue to learn basic and advanced dental assisting skills. Students learn about leading dental practices/procedures, equipment, and patient safety standards. Students engage in dental assisting activities such as dental charting, tray setup, radiograph mounting, pathology identification, and taking vital signs.0.5
Digital Arts IElectiveIn this exploratory course, students learn the elements and principles of design as well as foundational concepts of visual communication. While surveying a variety of media and art, students use image editing, animation, and digital drawing to put into practice the art principles they’ve learned. They explore career opportunities in the design, production, display, and presentation of digital artwork. They respond to the artwork of others, and learn how to combine artistic elements to create finished pieces that effectively communicate their ideas.0.5
Digital Arts IIElectiveStudents build on the skills and concepts they learned in Digital Arts I as they develop their vocabulary of digital design elements. By the end of the course, they have created a collection of digital art projects for their digital design portfolio.0.5
Digital PhotographyElectiveIn this one-semester course, students will learn the basics of photographic composition and lighting, and develop an understanding of using a digital camera and the basics of preparing a digital darkroom. Students will also learn basic color theory and the fundamentals of image processing. Software skills are taught through practical, hands-on activities that get students involved in the learning process and help them retain the content. This course is designed for students who have no background in photography to produce their own unique and highly personalized images.0.5
Early Childhood EducationElectiveIn the course, students learn how to create fun and educational environments for children; how to keep the environment safe for children; and how to encourage the health and well-being of infants, toddlers, and school-aged children.0.5
Engineering Design/CADElectiveDesigners and manufacturers in virtually every industry use computer-aided design systems to create engineering design solutions. This course introduces engineering and the basics of CAD software: creating points, lines, other geometric forms, isometric drawings, and 3D models. Students learn how to translate initial concepts into functional designs and 3D walkthroughs, and explore career options in this hands-on, introductory-level course.0.5
Family and Consumer ScienceElectiveIn this course, students develop skills and knowledge to help them transition into adult roles within the family. They learn to make wise consumer choices, prepare nutritious meals, contribute effectively as part of a team, manage a household budget, and balance roles of work and family. They gain an appreciation for the responsibilities of family members throughout the life span and the contributions to the well-being of the family and the community. (Available on Peak only.)0.5
Fashion and Interior DesignElectiveStudents try their hand at designing as they learn the basics of color and design, then test their skills through hands-on projects. In addition, they develop the essential communication skills that build success in any business. By the end of the course, students are well on their way to developing the portfolio needed to get started in this exciting field.0.5
Fine ArtElectiveThis course combines art history, appreciation, and analysis, while engaging students in hands-on creative projects. Lessons introduce major periods and movements in art history while focusing on masterworks and the intellectual, technical, and creative processes behind those works. Studio lessons provide opportunities for drawing, painting, sculpting, and other creative endeavors.1
Food Production IElectiveThis course explores the foundations of the food industry, from nutrition and chemistry to processing and safety, and delves into some of the most pressing foodborne issues of our day. Discussions of current topics and trends center on genetically engineered foods, environmental concerns and sustainability, food needs of the world, the impacts of food on health, and more.0.5
Food Production IIElectiveThis is the second semester of Food Production. This course explores the foundations of the food industry, from nutrition and chemistry to processing and safety, and delves into some of the most pressing foodborne issues of our day. Discussions of current topics and trends center on genetically engineered foods, environmental concerns and sustainability, food needs of the world, the impacts of food on health, and more.0.5
Fundamentals of ManufacturingElectiveIn this course, students will develop foundational skills in basic mechanisms; robotics to include: parts identification and applications of robotic arms in manufacturing; CAD (Computer Aided Design with SpectraCAD); CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machining, and foundational employability skills. Free software included in course (Windows only)0.5
Game Design IElectiveGame Design encourages students to use their creative and technical skills as they learn about the many aspects of designing games. The course explores different types of video game software and hardware, various gaming platforms, the technical skills necessary to design games, troubleshooting, internet safety techniques, and the history of gaming. Students also have the opportunity to create their own plan for a 2D video game. The course is designed to help prepare students either for post-secondary education in game design or for an entry level career.0.5
Game Design IIElectiveIn Game Design II, students have the opportunity to conceptualize, design, and create their own video game. They explore various video game software and hardware, sharpen their coding skills, and learn about game storylines, player progression, and algorithmic decision making. Students learn to analyze player goals, player actions, rewards, and challenges, among many other gameplay components. The course helps students develop 21st-century skills involving creativity, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and technical expertise that will put them at the forefront of a future in technology.0.5
General Accounting IElectiveGeneral Accounting Levels 1 and 2 provide students with a foundation in the mechanics of accounting as well as the opportunity to apply accounting concepts to real-world situations and make informed business decisions. Students will explore real world case studies of companies such as TOMs Shoes, iTunes, American Eagle, McDonald's, and Google. Students will master valued skills, such as critical thinking and technology use, and commercial technology. Students will be equipped to work with Microsoft Excel, Peachtree, QuickBooks, and Automated Accounting Online. The courses include units on careers in accounting, ethics, global awareness, financial literacy, and forensic accounting. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
General Accounting IIElectiveGeneral Accounting Levels 1 and 2 provide students with a foundation in the mechanics of accounting as well as the opportunity to apply accounting concepts to real-world situations and make informed business decisions. Students will explore real world case studies of companies such as TOMs Shoes, iTunes, American Eagle, McDonald's, and Google. Students will master valued skills, such as critical thinking and technology use, and commercial technology. Students will be equipped to work with Microsoft Excel, Peachtree, QuickBooks, and Automated Accounting Online. The courses include units on careers in accounting, ethics, global awareness, financial literacy, and forensic accounting. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Gothic LiteratureElectiveSince the eighteenth century, Gothic tales have influenced fiction writers and fascinated readers. This course focuses on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrates how the core writing drivers produce a suspenseful environment for readers. Some of the recurring themes and elements found in the genre are also presented. As they complete the course, students gain an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of Gothic literature.0.5
Great Minds in ScienceElectiveThis course focuses on ten of today's greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow's world.0.5
Green Design and TechnologyElectiveThis course examines the impact of human activities on sustainability while exploring the basic principles and technologies that support sustainable design. Students learn about the potential for emerging energy technologies such as water, wind, and solar power. They find out how today’s businesses are adapting to the increased demand for sustainable products and services. In this course, students develop a comprehensive understanding of this fast-growing field.0.5
HTML.5/CSS3 ProgrammingElectiveThis course is designed to teach students to build effective websites using real-world case scenarios. Each tutorial is based on a case problem that leads students through the creation of a website while they master new techniques and complex concepts. The course covers concepts such as page layout, basic graphic design, mobile design, working with tables and columns, designing forms, using multimedia, JavaScript, and exploring arrays, loops and conditional statements.0.5
Health (Credit Recovery)ElectiveThis one-semester credit recovery course provides students with information that will help them live a more healthy and productive life. The emphasis is on making healthy personal decisions and in getting the information needed to make those choices. The course addresses both mental and physical health. Students learn about nutrition, including food guidelines and types of food; eating disorders are also covered. Students learn about first aid and CPR, substance abuse, and human sexuality. The course also covers consumer health resources, including government resources, nonprofit resources, and health insurance. Students learn how technology is influencing health care, and they examine the benefits of frequent physical exercise.0.5
Health Science IElectiveThis course introduces students to the various disciplines within the health sciences, including toxicology, clinical medicine, and biotechnology. Students explore the importance of diagnostics and research in the identification and treatment of diseases. The course presents information and terminology for the health sciences and examines the contributions of different health science areas.0.5
Health Science IIElectiveIn this course, students will learn more about what it takes to be a successful health science professional, including how to communicate with patients. Students will explore the rights and responsibilities of both patients and health sciences professionals in patient care and learn more about how to promote wellness among patients and health care staffs. Finally, students learn more about safety in health sciences settings and the challenges and procedures of emergency care, infection control, and blood-borne pathogens.0.5
History of the HolocaustElectiveHolocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events. In this course, students study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multidisciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference, the potential for government-supported terror, and get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.0.5
Hospitality and TourismElectiveThis course introduces the hospitality and tourism industry, including hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other areas. Students learn about key hospitality issues, the development and management of tourist locations, event planning, marketing, and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.0.5
IT and Manufacturing ExplorationsElectiveThis course is designed as an exploration of two career clusters. Students get an introduction to these fields so that they can better assess which pathway to pursue. The first half of the course provides a comprehensive introduction to the essentials of web design, from planning page layouts to publishing a complete site to the web. Students learn how to use HTML to design their own web pages. The course covers basic HTML tags for formatting text as well as more advanced tags. Through real-world design scenarios and hands-on projects, students create compelling, usable websites using the latest suite of free tools. The second half of the course has an introduction to engineering and to advanced manufacturing.0.5
Image Design and EditingElectiveThis introductory design course is for students who want to create compelling, professional-looking graphic designs and photos. Students learn the basics of composition, color, and layout through the use of hands-on projects that allow them to use their creativity while developing important foundational skills. They use GIMP software to create a graphic design portfolio with a wide variety of projects involving the mastery of technical topics, such as working with layers and masks, adding special effects, and effectively using typefaces to create visual impact. The projects help students develop the skills they need to create and edit images of their own.0.5
International BusinessElectiveFrom geography to culture, global business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course helps students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in the global marketplace. It takes a global view of business, investigating why and how companies go international, and how they are more interconnected. Students gain an understanding of how economic, social, cultural, political, and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations are also explored. The course helps students cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in 21st-century business activities.0.5
Introduction to AgriscienceElectiveIn this course, students learn about the development and maintenance of agriculture, animal systems, natural resources, and other food sources. Students also examine the relationship between agriculture and natural resources and the environment, health, politics, and world trade.0.5
Introduction to Computer ScienceElectiveThis course provides a solid foundation using an algorithm-driven approach that is ideal for students’ first course in Computer Science. Students will learn about emerging topics, such as privacy, drones, cloud computing, and net. Students will also be introduced to programming languages such as C++, Java, Python, C#, and Ada.0.5
Introduction to Culinary ArtsElectiveIn this course, students learn all about food, including food culture, food history, food safety, and current food trends. They also learn about the food service industry and prepare some culinary dishes. Through hands-on activities and in-depth study of the culinary arts field, this course helps students hone their cooking skills and gives them the opportunity to explore careers in the food industry.0.5
Introduction to Entrepreneurship IElectiveIn this introductory business course, students learn the basics of planning and launching their own successful business. Whether they want to start their own money-making business or create a non-profit to help others, this course helps students develop the core skills they need to be successful. They learn how to come up with new business ideas, attract investors, market their business, and manage expenses.0.5
Introduction to Entrepreneurship IIElectiveStudents build on the business concepts they learned in Introduction to Entrepreneurship I. They learn about sales methods, financing and credit, accounting, pricing, and government regulations. They enhance their employability skills by preparing job related documents; developing interviewing skills; and learning about hiring, firing, and managing employees. Students develop a complete business plan and a presentation for potential investors.0.5
Introduction to Forestry and Natural ResourcesElectiveIn the Introduction to Forestry and Natural Resources course, students will learn more about forest ecology, management, and conservation. Students will explore topics such as environmental policy, land use, water resources, and wildlife management. Finally, students learn more about forestry related careers and important issues facing forestry professionals today.0.5
Introduction to ManufacturingElectiveThis course will give students a behind-the-scenes look at the vast industry called manufacturing. In this unit, students examine the basics of manufacturing, including a brief history and some of the basic processes and principles that work together to transform raw materials into useful and valuable commodities.0.5
Introduction to Medical TerminologyElectiveThis course is designed for the beginning health care student and simplifies the process of learning hundreds of complex medical terms. The course helps students understand specialties, pathology, diagnostic, and treatment procedures. The course includes critical thinking exercise scenarios that involve patients and pathology so students can apply their knowledge to the real world.0.5
Java Programming IElectiveJava Programming Levels 1 and 2 introduce programmers to the power of Java for developing applications while learning the basic principles of structured and object-oriented programming. These courses incorporate Java with meaningful real-world exercises and a wealth of case problems help students build skills critical for ongoing programming success. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Java Programming IIElectiveJava Programming Levels 1 and 2 introduce programmers to the power of Java for developing applications while learning the basic principles of structured and object-oriented programming. These courses incorporate Java with meaningful real-world exercises and a wealth of case problems help students build skills critical for ongoing programming success. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Law and Order/Legal StudiesElectiveThis course focuses on the creation and application of laws in society. Topics include how law and ethics are intertwined, the lawmaking process, and the steps involved in the court system. In addition, students will take a closer look at individual types of laws, including criminal, tort, consumer, and family law.0.5
Lean Manufacturing and AutomationElectiveIn this course, students will develop an understanding of lean manufacturing, skills in robotics, material handling, and electrical systems, while continuing with projects in CNC milling and turning. The course will also include foundational skills in math for technicians and blue print reading. Free software included in course (Windows only)0.5
Life SkillsElectiveThis one-semester elective is designed to increase students’ knowledge of and ability in using the skills necessary for everyday living. Life Skills emphasizes defining personal values, goal-setting and planning, and solving problems. Instructional material focuses on dealing with media and peer pressure, communication and relationships, working with others, avoiding and/or resolving conflict, decision making, wellness and personal safety, aspects of good citizenship, environmental awareness, and how students can contribute to their own community. The course is organized in six units: Course Introduction; Thinking About Yourself; Thinking for Yourself; Taking Care of Yourself; Caring for Your Relationships; and Caring About Your World.0.5
Manufacturing Process Development IElectiveManufacturing Process Development Levels 1 and 2 help students develop skills in manufacturing processes development through research projects on current trends and applications in the world of manufacturing. Students will also develop virtual projects in CAD/CAM/CNC. Students will work with flexible manufacturing systems in a virtual environment. Students will work with robotics and material handling as an integral element of manufacturing processes. Students will also address the foundational skill: Industrial Safety Lock Out Tag Out. Additionally, students will develop skills with projects in advanced flexible manufacturing systems with the ER4u robot and CNC machines in a virtual environment and automated systems with SkillsUSA robotics projects (RAT). Students will have research projects in manufacturing methods and applications and prepare for certifications. Free software included in course (Windows only)0.5
Manufacturing Product DevelopmentElectiveIn this course, students will explore rapid prototyping; CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing w/SpectraCAM Turning), and the CAD/CAM process of developing CNC turning programs. Students will also begin advanced robotics programing with the ER4u robot; and gain exposure to power tools and math for technicians. Free software included in course (Windows only)0.5
Manufacturing SystemsElectiveIn this course, students will develop skills in automated systems; developing basic robot programs; CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing w/SpectraCAM Milling), and the CAD/CAM process of developing CNC milling programs. Students will also work with fluid power (pneumatics), as used in manufacturing systems; hand tools; and be introduced to QC (quality control) and skills measurement. Free software included in course (Windows only)0.5
Marketing IElectiveStudents learn the foundations and functions needed to successfully market goods, services, and ideas to consumers. Professional development, customer service, and social media are presented as keys to students' success. While students study business, economics, selling, human relations, communications, logistics, promotion, product planning, and pricing, they also see marketing as a career choice.0.5
Marketing IIElectiveStudents learn the foundations and functions needed to successfully market goods, services, and ideas to consumers. Professional development, customer service, and social media are presented as keys to students' success. While students study business, economics, selling, human relations, communications, logistics, promotion, product planning, and pricing, they also learn about marketing as a career choice.0.5
Medical Assistant IElectiveMedical Assistant Levels 1–3 help students develop the knowledge base, skills, and behaviors that entry-level medical assistants need to succeed. Students will be introduced to anatomy and physiology, diagnostic tests, diseases and disorders, treatments, nutrition as well as personal growth topics such as professionalism, teamwork, and time management. They will learn key functions of medical assistants, such as business communications, patient record maintenance, medical insurance and coding, billing, clinical and laboratory procedures, and specialty examinations and procedures. Levels 1–3 must be taken in sequential order. Prerequisites: Introduction to Medical Terminology and Anatomy and Physiology (Levels 1 and 2). Nursing Assistant with Exam Prep and Medical Assistant with Exam Prep include certification exam preparation as indicated by the course titles. These courses can be taken without labs and will prepare students for the written portion of the exams. Course labs require access to a clinical setting to complete hands-on activities (materials and instruction not provided by Fuel Education). Video tutorials are included in the course labs to provide exposure to skills in addition to hands-on practice. Schools adopting the Career Readiness Pathways will want to establish local solutions for providing students with access to equipment, lab settings and internships, as needed. Practical hour and skill requirements for certifications vary by state; Fuel Education does not provide arrangements for students to complete hands-on requirements.0.5
Medical Assistant IIElectiveMedical Assistant Levels 1–3 help students develop the knowledge base, skills, and behaviors that entry-level medical assistants need to succeed. Students will be introduced to anatomy and physiology, diagnostic tests, diseases and disorders, treatments, nutrition as well as personal growth topics such as professionalism, teamwork, and time management. They will learn key functions of medical assistants, such as business communications, patient record maintenance, medical insurance and coding, billing, clinical and laboratory procedures, and specialty examinations and procedures. Levels 1–3 must be taken in sequential order. Prerequisites: Introduction to Medical Terminology and Anatomy and Physiology (Levels 1 and 2). Nursing Assistant with Exam Prep and Medical Assistant with Exam Prep include certification exam preparation as indicated by the course titles. These courses can be taken without labs and will prepare students for the written portion of the exams. Course labs require access to a clinical setting to complete hands-on activities (materials and instruction not provided by Fuel Education). Video tutorials are included in the course labs to provide exposure to skills in addition to hands-on practice. Schools adopting the Career Readiness Pathways will want to establish local solutions for providing students with access to equipment, lab settings and internships, as needed. Practical hour and skill requirements for certifications vary by state; Fuel Education does not provide arrangements for students to complete hands-on requirements.0.5
Medical Assistant III with Certified Medical Assistant Certification PreparationElectiveMedical Assistant Levels 1–3 help students develop the knowledge base, skills, and behaviors that entry-level medical assistants need to succeed. Students will be introduced to anatomy and physiology, diagnostic tests, diseases and disorders, treatments, nutrition, as well as personal growth topics such as professionalism, teamwork, and time management. They will learn key functions of medical assistants, such as business communications, patient record maintenance, medical insurance and coding, billing, clinical and laboratory procedures, and specialty examinations and procedures. Levels 1–3 must be taken in sequential order. Prerequisites: Introduction to Medical Terminology and Anatomy and Physiology (Levels 1 and 2). Nursing Assistant with Exam Prep and Medical Assistant with Exam Prep include certification exam preparation as indicated by the course titles. These courses can be taken without labs and will prepare students for the written portion of the exams. Course labs require access to a clinical setting to complete hands-on activities (materials and instruction not provided by Fuel Education). Video tutorials are included in the course labs to provide exposure to skills in addition to hands-on practice. Schools adopting the Career Readiness Pathways will want to establish local solutions for providing students with access to equipment, lab settings and internships, as needed. Practical hour and skill requirements for certifications vary by state; Fuel Education does not provide arrangements for students to complete hands-on requirements.0.5
Microsoft Access with Certification PreparationElectiveUsing a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft Access. This course walks students through basic to advanced features by experimenting with database creation. Types of activities include, creating databases, creating a query, creating a form, creating tables, creating reports, and creating macros. Students work through these hands on projects to master skills in commonly used database design processes. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/36.5. Office 2016/36.5 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/36.5. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education0.5
Microsoft Excel with Certification PreparationElectiveUsing a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft Excel. This course walks students through basic to advanced features by experimenting with spreadsheet creation. Types of activities include, creating worksheets, charts, formulas, functions, what-if analysis, and financial functions. Students work through these hands on projects to master skills in commonly used features of spreadsheets. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/36.5. Office 2016/36.5 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/36.5. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education0.5
Microsoft PowerPoint with Certification PreparationElectiveUsing a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft PowerPoint. This course walks student through basic to advanced features by experimenting with presentation creation. Types of activities include, creating presentations that include, text, images, sound, animation, and transition. Students work through these hands on projects to master skills commonly used in presentation software. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/36.5. Office 2016/36.5 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/36.5. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education0.5
Microsoft Word with Certification PreparationElectiveUsing a project based approach, students are introduced to Microsoft Word. This course walks students through basic to advanced features by experimenting with document creation. Forms of documents created include research papers, business letters, resumes, letters and mailing labels. Students work through these hands on projects to hone skills in formatting, page layout, macro creation, and a vast variety of commonly used word processing tools. Microsoft Office is required for this course. There are two course version options - Microsoft Office 2013 OR Microsoft Office 2016/36.5. Office 2016/36.5 courses will be available by August 2016. If a client already has Microsoft Office 2013 they can use the 2013 course versions that require the Microsoft Office 2013 software. Otherwise, they should use 2016/36.5. Students can get an educational version for free at this link as long as they use a valid school email address: https://products.office.com/en-us/student/office-in-education0.5
Modern Livestock & Poultry Production IElectiveThis course covers basic animal science and livestock industry information as well as current issues in animal agriculture. The course includes information students should know about livestock and poultry animals for classroom study and beyond. The course is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the anatomy, physiology, nutrition, feeding, and reproduction of multiple livestock and poultry breeds.0.5
Modern Livestock & Poultry Production IIElectiveThis is the second semester of Livestock and Poultry Production. This course covers basic animal science and livestock industry information as well as current issues in animal agriculture. The course includes information students should know about livestock and poultry animals for classroom study and beyond. The course is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the anatomy, physiology, nutrition, feeding, and reproduction of multiple livestock and poultry breeds.0.5
Music AppreciationElectiveThis course introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music. The first semester covers basic music theory concepts as well as early musical forms, classical music, patriotic and nationalistic music, and 20th century music. The second semester presents modern traditions, including American jazz, gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip hop. The course explores the history of music, from the surviving examples of rudimentary musical forms through to contemporary pieces from around the world. To comply with certain state standards for the arts, a student “performance practicum” is required for full credit each semester. The performance practicum requirement can be met through participation in supervised instrumental or vocal lessons, church or community choirs, community musical performances, or any other structured program that meets at regular intervals and provides opportunities for students to build vocal and/or instrumental skills. Parents or guardians will be required to present their student's proposed practicum to the students’ teachers for approval, and validate their student's regular participation in the chosen performance practicum.1
Mythology and FolkloreElectiveMighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Since the first people gathered around fires, mythology and folklore have been used as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. Beginning with an overview of mythology and different kinds of folklore, students journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle, and watch as clever monsters overcome those stronger than themselves. They explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how these are still used to shape society today.0.5
Network+ Guide to Networks IElectiveGuide to Networks Levels 1 and 2 give students the technical skills and industry know-how to begin an exciting career installing, configuring, and troubleshooting computer networks. The course prepares students for success on CompTIA’s Network+ N1-006 certification exam. Students will explore On the Job stories, application activities, and hands-on projects to develop real-world problem solving skills. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Network+ Guide to Networks II with Network+ Certification PreparationElectiveGuide to Networks Levels 1 and 2 give students the technical skills and industry know-how to begin an exciting career installing, configuring, and troubleshooting computer networks. The course prepares students for success on CompTIA’s Network+ N1-006 certification exam. Students will explore On the Job stories, application activities, and hands-on projects to develop real-world problem solving skills. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Nursing Assistant IElectiveNurses Assistant Levels 1–3 are designed to prepare students for meaningful careers in acute care, long-term care, and home health. Students will learn more than 1.50 procedures, including key skills in patient handling and transfers, wound care, communication, safety, and record keeping. Students also learn about infection control, safety, culture, working with difficult patients, OSHA, communication, age appropriate care, and legal considerations. Levels 1–3 must be taken in sequential order. Nursing Assistant with Exam Prep and Medical Assistant with Exam Prep include certification exam preparation as indicated by the course titles. These courses can be taken without labs and will prepare students for the written portion of the exams. Course labs require access to a clinical setting to complete hands-on activities (materials and instruction not provided by Fuel Education). Video tutorials are included in the course labs to provide exposure to skills in addition to hands-on practice. Schools adopting the Career Readiness Pathways will want to establish local solutions for providing students with access to equipment, lab settings and internships, as needed. Practical hour and skill requirements for certifications vary by state; Fuel Education does not provide arrangements for students to complete hands-on requirements.0.5
Nursing Assistant IIElectiveNurses Assistant Levels 1–3 are designed to prepare students for meaningful careers in acute care, long-term care, and home health. Students will learn more than 1.50 procedures, including key skills in patient handling and transfers, wound care, communication, safety, and record keeping. Students also learn about infection control, safety, culture, working with difficult patients, OSHA, communication, age appropriate care, and legal considerations. Levels 1–3 must be taken in sequential order. Nursing Assistant with Exam Prep and Medical Assistant with Exam Prep include certification exam preparation as indicated by the course titles. These courses can be taken without labs and will prepare students for the written portion of the exams. Course labs require access to a clinical setting to complete hands-on activities (materials and instruction not provided by Fuel Education). Video tutorials are included in the course labs to provide exposure to skills in addition to hands-on practice. Schools adopting the Career Readiness Pathways will want to establish local solutions for providing students with access to equipment, lab settings and internships, as needed. Practical hour and skill requirements for certifications vary by state; Fuel Education does not provide arrangements for students to complete hands-on requirements.0.5
Nursing Assistant III with Certified Nursing Assistant Certification PreparationElectiveNurses Assistant Levels 1–3 are designed to prepare students for meaningful careers in acute care, long-term care, and home health. Students will learn more than 1.50 procedures, including key skills in patient handling and transfers, wound care, communication, safety, and record keeping. Students also learn about infection control, safety, culture, working with difficult patients, OSHA, communication, age appropriate care, and legal considerations. Levels 1–3 must be taken in sequential order. Nursing Assistant with Exam Prep and Medical Assistant with Exam Prep include certification exam preparation as indicated by the course titles. These courses can be taken without labs and will prepare students for the written portion of the exams. Course labs require access to a clinical setting to complete hands-on activities (materials and instruction not provided by Fuel Education). Video tutorials are included in the course labs to provide exposure to skills in addition to hands-on practice. Schools adopting the Career Readiness Pathways will want to establish local solutions for providing students with access to equipment, lab settings and internships, as needed. Practical hour and skill requirements for certifications vary by state; Fuel Education does not provide arrangements for students to complete hands-on requirements.0.5
Nutrition and WellnessElectiveThis one-semester elective course provides students with an overview of good nutrition principles that are necessary for physical and mental wellness and a long, healthy life. Instructional materials include discussions of digestion, basic nutrients, weight management, sports and fitness, and life-span nutrition. The course emphasizes an understanding of today’s food and eating trends and gives students the capacity to intelligently evaluate all available sources of nutrition information and make informed decisions. The course is organized in six units: Course Introduction; Wellness and Food Choices in Today’s World; Digestion and Major Nutrients; Body Size and Weight Management; Physical Fitness, Sports Nutrition, and Stress; and Life Cycle Nutrition.0.5
Peer CounselingElectiveThis course explains the role of a peer counselor, teaches observation, listening, and emphatic communication skills that counselors need, and provides basic training in conflict resolution, and group leadership. This course help prepare students to work as peer counselors and the skills they learn will enhance their ability to communicate effectively in personal and work relationships.0.5
Pharmacy Technician IElectivePharmacy Technician Levels 1, 2, and 3 provide students with knowledge and skills required for working with a licensed pharmacist in a variety of clinical and retail settings. Students learn medical and pharmaceutical terminology, pharmaceutical calculations, pharmaceutical techniques, sterile compounding, pharmacy recordkeeping, pharmacy law and ethics. The course creates awareness of common errors and provides students with opportunities to fine-tune critical thinking and problem solving skills. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Pharmacy Technician II with Pharmacy Technician Certification PreparationElectivePharmacy Technician Levels 1, 2, and 3 provide students with knowledge and skills required for working with a licensed pharmacist in a variety of clinical and retail settings. Students learn medical and pharmaceutical terminology, pharmaceutical calculations, pharmaceutical techniques, sterile compounding, pharmacy recordkeeping, pharmacy law and ethics. The course creates awareness of common errors and provides students with opportunities to fine-tune critical thinking and problem solving skills. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
Pharmacy Technician III with Pharmacy Technician Certification PreparationElectivePharmacy Technician Levels 1, 2, and 3 provide students with knowledge and skills required for working with a licensed pharmacist in a variety of clinical and retail settings. Students learn medical and pharmaceutical terminology, pharmaceutical calculations, pharmaceutical techniques, sterile compounding, pharmacy recordkeeping, pharmacy law and ethics. The course creates awareness of common errors and provides students with opportunities to fine-tune critical thinking and problem solving skills. Levels 1 and 2 must be taken in sequential order.0.5
PhilosophyElectiveThis one-semester course takes students on an exciting adventure that covers more than 2,.500 years of history. Along the way, students run into some very strange characters. For example, they read about a man who hung out on street corners, barefoot and dirty, pestering everyone he met with questions. They learn about another eccentric who climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed. Despite their odd behavior, these and other philosophers of the Western world are among the most brilliant and influential thinkers of all time. As students learn about these great thinkers, they come to see how and where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western civilization originated. Students also get a chance to ask themselves some of the same questions these great thinkers pondered. By the time they close the book on this course, students have a better understand themselves and the world around them—from atoms to outer space—and everything in between.0.5
Physical EducationElectiveThis pass/fail course combines online instructional guidance with student participation in weekly cardiovascular, aerobic, muscle-toning, and other activities. Students fulfill course requirements by keeping weekly logs of their physical activity. The course promotes the value of lifetime physical activity and includes instruction in injury prevention, nutrition and diet, and stress management. Students may enroll in the course for either one or two semesters, and repeat for further semesters as needed to fulfill state requirements.1
Physical Education (Credit Recovery)ElectiveThrough this one-semester credit recovery course, students learn a wide variety of fitness concepts that they will be able to use in their everyday life. The course addresses the fundamentals of physical fitness, including goal setting and target heart rate. Students learn about how their body works by studying static and dynamic balance, linear and rotary motion, anatomy, and biomechanics. They are introduced to a variety of lifetime activities, including tennis, golf, Frisbee, and orienteering. They also learn about activities to promote cardiorespiratory fitness, including kickboxing, hip hop dance, fitness walking, and cycling. Pilates, yoga, and breathing exercises that help promote physical and emotional wellness are addressed as well.0.5
Precision Machining TechnologyElectiveThis course provides an introduction to today’s machine tool industry. Students develop a solid understanding of fundamental and intermediate machining skills. The course provides an emphasis on safety throughout and offers thorough coverage of topics such as the basics of hand tools, job planning, benchwork, layout operations, drill press, milling and grinding process, and CNC. In addition, the course is aligned with the National Institute of Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Machining Level 1 Standard.0.5
Precision Machining Technology 2ElectiveThis is this is the second semester of Precision Machining Technology. Students pick up where they left off in their introduction to today’s machine tool industry. Students develop a solid understanding of fundamental and intermediate machining skills. The course provides an emphasis on safety throughout and offers thorough coverage of topics such as the basics of hand tools, job planning, bench work, layout operations, drill press, milling and grinding process, and CNC. In addition, the course is aligned with the National Institute of Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Machining Level 1 Standard.0.5
Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural ResourcesElectiveThis course teaches students about the steps food takes from the farm to the table. Students learn about the history of agriculture through animal husbandry, plant science, and managing our use of natural resources. The course provides students with a broad understanding of the subject matter while preparing them for hands-on learning to participate in Future Farmers of America and supervised agricultural experiences.0.5
Principles of Public Service: To Serve and ProtectElectiveThis course explores some common characteristics of careers in public service. Topics include an exploration of careers in public service, the role of government in public service, the importance of teamwork, effective leadership, and how rules and regulations are used to check government and individual conduct. In addition, students take a closer look at the communication and health, public safety, education, and social services sectors of public service. (Available on Online School Platform only.)0.5
Programming Logic and DesignElectiveThis course prepares student programmers for success by teaching them the fundamental principles of developing structured program logic. This course takes a unique, language independent approach to programming, with a distinctive emphasis on modern conventions and prepares students for all programming situations with introductions to object-oriented concepts, UML diagrams, and databases.0.5
Python ProgrammingElectiveThis course presents essential computer science topics, while also instructing on the Python programming language. Python is easy to learn and scales well to advanced applications. The course is engaging and brings relevance of the concepts and applications from the text to the real world. Hands-on labs teach students to write and run code in an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) from their web browser. A chatbot provides hints and feedback when students get stuck, which encourages persistence through on-demand assistance.0.5
Reaching Your Academic PotentialElectiveStudents learn essential academic skills within the context of their learning style, individual learning environment, and long-term goals. This course helps students develop habits for more successful reading, writing, studying, communication, collaboration, time management, and concentration. It also provides insights into how the brain works when they are learning, and ways to maximize its potential.0.5
Real World ParentingElectiveWhat is the best way to care for children and teach them self-confidence and a sense of responsibility? Parenting involves more than having a child and providing food and shelter. In this one-semester course, students learn what to prepare for, what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to create the best environment for their children. Parenting roles and responsibilities, nurturing and protective environments for children, positive parenting strategies, and effective communication in parent–child relationships are some of the topics covered in this course.0.5
Restaurant ManagementElectiveIn Restaurant Management, students will learn the responsibilities of running a restaurant—from ordering supplies to hiring and firing employees. This course covers the different types of restaurants; managing kitchen and wait staff; food safety and hygiene; customer relations; marketing using a point-of-sale system; scheduling employees; and dealing with difficult guests. Restaurant Management will prepare you for a steady career, whether students plan to buy a fast food franchise, operate a casual sit-down restaurant, or oversee a fine-dining establishment.0.5
Security+ II with Security+ Certification PreparationElectiveThis course covers the essentials of network security, including compliance and operational security; threats and vulnerabilities; application, data, and host security; access control and identity management; and cryptography, mobile device security, and virtualization. The use of case studies allows students to explore real-world security scenarios and allow students to apply what they have learned.0.5
Service LearningElectiveThis project may be used in a variety of ways—as a stand-alone project, in conjunction with another course, or as a foundation around which to base a one-semester course. An introductory unit presents instruction on the nature of service learning. Students are taught how to identify community needs, select projects that are meaningful to themselves, apply practical skills, reflect on their learning experience, and behave responsibly in a service setting. Students then move on to design and conduct service learning experiences of their own, according to the requirements of their projects. Documents to support teachers in guiding students through the project are included.0.5
Skills for HealthElectiveThis course focuses on important skills and knowledge in nutrition; physical activity; the dangers of substance use and abuse; injury prevention and safety; growth and development; and personal health, environmental conservation, and community health resources. The curriculum is designed around topics and situations that engage student discussion and motivate students to analyze internal and external influences on their health-related decisions. The course helps students build the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.0.5
Social Problems IElectiveStudents learn about the complex relationship among societies, governments, and the individual. Each unit focuses on a particular area of concern, often within a global context. Possible solutions at both the structural level as well as that of the individual are examined. Students learn more about how social problems affect them personally.0.5
Social Problems IIElectiveThe Social Problems II course continues to examine timely social issues affecting individuals and societies around the globe. Students learn about the overall structure of the social problem as well as how it impacts their lives. Each unit focuses on a particular social problem, including racial discrimination, drug abuse, the loss of community, and urban sprawl, and discusses possible solutions at both individual and structural levels. For each issue, students examine the connections in the global arena involving societies, governments, and the individual.0.5
Sociology IElectiveThe world is becoming more complex. How do your beliefs, values, and behavior affect the people around you and the world in which you live? Students examine social problems in the increasingly connected world, and learn how human relationships can strongly influence and impact their lives. Exciting online video journeys to an array of areas in the sociological world are an important component of this relevant and engaging course.0.5
Sociology IIElectiveSociology is the study of people, social life, and society. By developing a sociological imagination, students examine how society itself shapes human action and beliefs—and how in turn these factors reshape society itself. Fascinating online video journeys inform students and motivate them to seek more knowledge on their own.0.5
Sports Medicine IElectiveThis course introduces students to essential skills in sports medicine including fitness assessment, conditioning, emergency preparedness, injury management, therapeutic modalities, nutrition, and ethical and legal considerations. Students explore careers in fitness instruction, athletic training, exercise physiology, sports management, and physical therapy.0.5
Sports Medicine IIElectiveThis is the second semester of Sports Medicine. In this course, students continue their study of essential skills in Sports Medicine including fitness assessment, conditioning, emergency preparedness, injury management, therapeutic modalities, nutrition, and ethical and legal considerations. Students explore careers in fitness instruction, athletic training, exercise physiology, sports management, and physical therapy.0.5
Sports and Entertainment MarketingElectiveIn this course, students have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multibilliondollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. Students learn how professional athletes, sports teams, and well-known entertainers are marketed and how some of them become billionaires as a result. For students who have ever wondered about how things work behind the scenes of a major sporting event, such as the Super Bowl, or even entertained the idea of playing a role in such an event, this course introduces the fundamentals of such a career.0.5
Veterinary ScienceElectiveThis course examines some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. Toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases affect not only the animals around us but at times, us humans as well! Through veterinary medicine and science, the prevention and treatment of diseases and health issues are studied and applied.0.5
Web DesignElectiveThis course provides a comprehensive introduction to the essentials of web design, from planning page layouts to publishing a complete site to the web. Students learn how to use HTML to design their own web pages. The course covers basic HTML tags for formatting text as well as more advanced tags. Through real-world design scenarios and hands-on projects, students create compelling, usable websites using the latest suite of free tools.0.5
Wildlife and Natural Resource Management IElectiveThis course explores wildlife, fisheries, and natural resource management in today's world. The course provides students with the history and administration of natural resources, as well as broader concepts that impact everyone, including conservation, endangered species, and human impacts on wildlife. Students also focus study how to identify species, including wild animals in their habitats. Finally the course helps students view their role in the future and how a better understanding of the natural world can prepare them for success.0.5
Wildlife and Natural Resource Management IIElectiveThis is the second semester of Wildlife and Natural Resource Management. This course explores wildlife, fisheries, and natural resource management in today's world. The course provides students with the history and administration of natural resources, as well as broader concepts that impact everyone, including conservation, endangered species, and human impacts on wildlife. Students also study how to identify species, including wild animals in their habitats. Finally the course helps students view their role in the future and how a better understanding of the natural world can prepare them for success.0.5
World ReligionsElectiveThroughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taoism. Students trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course also looks at some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examines the connections and influences they have.0.5