Edgenuity

Rigorous content with interactive instruction.

NCAA APPROVED Edgenuity courses combine rigorous content with direct-instruction videos, multimedia, and interactive learning tools and resources to engage and motivate students. They have partnered with all fifty states to provide curriculum to help students succeed.

Learning Styles: Linguistic – Word Smart, Visual/Spatial – Picture Smart
Compatibility: Computer & iPad (with some exceptions)
Delivery Format: Web-based
Standards: Oklahoma, CCSS

Click any of the links below to see course descriptions.

Middle School

Language Arts

Description
Sixth In this full-year sixth-grade course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. Students grow as readers and writers as they read critically, analyze texts, and cite evidence through a vast range of engaging literary and informational reading selections. Students explore a full unit on Lewis Carroll’s classic novel Through the Looking Glass and read essential parts of other fictional texts including Holes, Esperanza Rising, and The Number Devil. Students also evaluate poetry and drama, such as a poem by Langston Hughes and an excerpt from Brighton Beach Memoirs. In order to help students comprehend text structure, author’s purpose, and argumentative claims, the course delves into nonfiction, from a biography of Frida Kahlo to a historic speech about the Brooklyn Bridge. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also engage in routine, responsive writing based on an examination of the variety of texts they have read. In more extensive process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats.
Seventh In this full-year seventh-grade course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. Engaging literary and informational reading selections prompt students to read critically, analyze texts, and cite evidence. Students explore fictional texts, including The Outsiders, Dragonwings, and a short story by Walter Dean Meyers. In the course, students explore the drama The Miracle Worker, paired with Helen Keller’s autobiography. They also read the poetry of Langston Hughes and William Butler Yeats. To help students comprehend text structure, author’s purpose, and argument, the course delves into nonfiction, from the informational text Exploring the Titanic to a speech by Cesar Chavez. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also take part in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats.
Eighth In this full-year eighth-grade course, students develop a mastery of reading, writing, and language arts skills. Engaging literary and informational reading selections inspire students to read critically, analyze texts, and cite evidence. Students explore units on Jack London’s classic novel The Call of the Wild and the contemporary novel The Land by Mildred Taylor. They also read essential parts of other fictional texts, including Monster, “Raymond’s Run,” and “The Lottery.” Students are exposed to a thoughtful look at the Anne Frank diary and play, and they venture into author’s purpose, text structure, and argumentative claims in informational texts such as The Great Fire, the narrative of Frederick Douglass, and a speech by Randy Pausch. Students sharpen their vocabulary, grammar, and listening skills through explicit modeling and ample practice. Students also take part in routine, responsive writing based on texts they have read. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write topical essays in narrative, informative, analytical, and argumentative formats.

Math

Description
Mathematics 6 The course begins by connecting ratio and rate to multiplication and division, allowing students to use ratio reasoning to solve a wide variety of problems. Students further apply their understanding of multiplication and division to explain the standard procedure for dividing fractions. This course builds upon previous notions of the number system to now include the entire set of rational numbers. Students begin to understand the use of variables as they write, evaluate, and simplify expressions. They use the idea of equality and properties of operations to solve one-step equations and inequalities. In statistics, students explore different graphical ways to display data. They use data displays, measures of center, and measures of variability to summarize data sets. The course concludes with students reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume.
Mathematics 7 This course begins with an in-depth unit on proportional reasoning where students utilize concrete models such as bar diagrams and tables to increase and develop conceptual understanding of rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. Students’ number fluency and understanding of the rational number system are extended as they perform operations with signed rational numbers embedded in real-world contexts. In statistics, students develop meanings for representative samples, measures of central tendency, variation, and the ideal representation for comparisons of given data sets. Students develop an understanding of both theoretical and experimental probability. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multistep equations and inequalities. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures.
Mathematics 8 This course begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations, and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions. Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean theorem, distance, and volume.

History

Description
MS World History Providing students with an opportunity to learn the diverse history that has shaped our world, SS1105 delves into the evolution of civilization from the rise of ancient empires through the 21st century. Middle school students enrolled in this exciting and informative course will investigate the development of medieval societies, the effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation, and the progress made during different periods of revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and reform. Over the course of two semesters, students will analyze contributions of political conflicts and social issues to the continuing development and interdependence among nations in the modern world.
MS US History Offering an interactive and comprehensive overview of American history, this course engages and inspires students to learn about the rich and diverse history of America’s native peoples, early European colonization and settlement in America, and the creation of a new nation through the American Revolution. Middle school students enrolled in this course will closely examine major changes brought about by the nation’s reconstruction, industrialization, urbanization, and progressive reforms and consider the implications each of these events had on the expansion of the United States’ global influence through modern times. Over the course of two semesters, interesting course content encourages students to think carefully about the challenges and opportunities facing the United States in the 21st century.
MS World Cultures and Geography This year-long middle school course is designed to introduce students to the study of geography and help them master important concepts in physical and human geography. World Cultures and Geography is a comprehensive course, organized by region, that helps students understand the Earth’s physical and human variety. Students will analyze population and settlement patterns, evaluate how human activities modify the physical environment, and compare development, standards of living, systems of government, and economic factors around the world. In addition, students will gain a rich understanding of global cultures and the historical factors that have shaped the world around them. All units in the course are parallel, and include studies in physical and human geography, ancient cultures, regional studies, and modern issues. National Geographic standards, which provide guidelines for the study of geography, form the backbone of this course. This course also is aligned to the National Historical Thinking Standards, the Common Core Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, and state standards.
MS Civics, Government and Economics A year-long eighth grade level course is built upon the national and state Civic and Economic standards with emphasis on: Social studies Skills, Government, Citizenship, Economics, and the areas of Technology, Civic Participation, and Society. Semester one will introduce students to social studies skills they will need to analyze maps, charts, and data, as well as the ability to be problem solver and decision makers. Students will also explore fundamental concepts and philosophies lead to the creation of the United States Constitution. Students will also explore the structure of the United States government on a national, state, and local level, as well as examine tribal government and sovereignty. Semester two will allow students to investigate what it means to be an American citizen and explore the duties and responsibilities associate with such a role. Students will analyze the political process, political parties, and influences that affect them both. Students will also trace the evolution of technology and the changing effects it has had on politics and society. Students will then be introduced to economic concepts such as thinking as an economist, supply and demand, the banking system, and economics in business and government. Students will then explore both government and economics on a global scale.

High School

English

Description College Preparatory/ Work Ready Credit Credit Value
Language Arts 9 This freshman-year English course invites students to explore diverse texts across 12 unit topics. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students will master comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students will read a range of classic texts including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” They study short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course. English I 1.0
Language Arts 10 Focused on application, ELA 2065 reinforces literary analysis and 21stcentury skills with superb literature pieces, application eResources, and educational interactives. Keeping the recent ninth-grade graduates in mind, the course uses the foundations of reading, writing, and analysis skills to take students gradually to a higher level of mastery that they will need to succeed in future English Language Arts courses and the workplace. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills, allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures, and furthers training in media literacy, 21st-century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Under the guidance of the eWriting software, students will also compose eight essays. Essay types include descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analysis, research, narrative, and compare-and-contrast. Classic literature pieces, including the full texts of Antigone, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, and Gulliver’s Travels, train students in conquering complex texts. Catering not only to educators but also to students, the course texts are contemporary and include many selections from world literature. English II 1.0
Language Arts 11 This junior-year English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students will master the comprehension and literary analysis strategies that the Common Core State Standards require. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, Langston Hughes, Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers. This course is aligned with the State Standards for English Language Arts. English III 1.0
Language Arts 12 This senior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain English IV 1.0
Literacy and Comprehension I Literacy and Comprehension I is one of two semester-long intervention courses designed to support the development of strategic reading and writing skills. These courses use a thematic and contemporary approach, including high-interest topics to motivate students and expose them to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. Both courses offer an engaging technology-based interface that inspires and challenges students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self-evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning. Elective .5
Literacy and Comprehension II Offering high-interest topics to motivate students who are reading two to three levels below grade level, to use a thematic and contemporary approach to expose students to effective instructional principles using diverse content area and real-world texts. To offer an engaging, technology-based interface that inspires and challenges high school and middle school students to gain knowledge and proficiency in the following comprehension strategies: summarizing, questioning, previewing and predicting, recognizing text structure, visualizing, making inferences, and monitoring understanding with metacognition. Aimed at improving fluency and vocabulary, self evaluation strategies built into these courses inspire students to take control of their learning. Elective .5
Intro to Speech and Communication Beginning with an introduction that builds student understanding of the elements, principles, and characteristics of human communication, LA1097 offers fascinating insight into verbal and nonverbal messages and cultural and gender differences in the areas of listening and responding. High school students enrolled in this one-semester course will be guided through engaging lectures and interactive activities, exploring themes of self-awareness and perception in communication. The course concludes with units on informative and persuasive speeches, and students are given the opportunity to critique and analyze speeches in the course. Elective .5
IDEA Writing - Instruction to Develop Expository & Applied Writing Writing: Instruction to Develop Expository and Applied Writing. This exciting new course, aimed at students in grades 9-12, uses the writing process and the Six Traits of effective writing as an overarching framework that encompasses targeted lessons on reputable research, effective communication, solid grammar, and compelling style. By the end of the course, students will have had hands-on experience writing personal reflections, definition essays, research essays, persuasive and informative pieces, and literary analyses. They will also be able to use and interpret Six Traits rubrics to evaluate writing, articulate and apply strategies for research and writing, and summarize a variety of grammar and usage points. This one semester course aligns to American Diploma Project standards. Other English 1.0
Expository Reading & Writing This elective English course is designed to develop critical reading and writing skills while preparing high school students to meet the demands of college-level work. While students will explore some critical reading skills in fiction and poetry, the focus of this course will be on expository and persuasive texts and the analytical reading skills that are necessary for college success. Students will read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Walt Whitman, Abraham Lincoln, Cesar Chavez, Martin Luther King Jr., Langston Hughes, Julia Alvarez, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Gary Soto. This course offers 12 units, including a full-length novel study of Jack London’s The Call of the Wild and an in-depth study of the informational text The Riddle of the Rosetta Stone by James Cross Giblinn. The course also includes an extensive selection of shorter expository and argumentative texts. This course also features system-scorable essay assignments, shorter writing assignments, multimedia projects, and research assignments. This course is an ideal offering for students in upper high school grades who plan to attend college but need to develop stronger expository reading and writing skills to be successful. Other English 1.0
Honors English Language & Composition Students in English Language and Composition study how writers use language to create meaning. Students will read a variety of nonfiction prose and will analyze many styles and genres including essays, journalism, political writing, science writing, nature writing, autobiographies/biographies, diaries, speeches, history writing, and criticism. They focus the majority of their practice on writing expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. In addition to writing, students also study visual rhetoric such as photographs, advertisements, and political cartoons. The class is structured around teaching reading and writing skills honed by close reading of and writing original student essays, many of which are products of several revisions. This content is presented in an online course through which students will view lectures from experienced highly qualified instructors, access nonfiction rhetoric (written and visual), and practice close reading and writing skills with continual feedback from instructors by means of various communication technologies, including phone, Instant Message, email, discussion thread, and live chat. English 3 1.0*
Honors English Literature & Composition Literature and Composition is designed to be a college/university-level course. This course equips students to critically analyze all forms of literature in order to comment insightfully about an author or genre’s use of style or literary device. Students will also interpret meaning based on form; examine the trademark characteristics of literary genres and periods; and critique literary works through expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. As students consider styles and devices, they will apply them to their creative writing. English 4 1.0*

Math

Description College Preparatory/ Work Ready Credit Credit Value
Pre-Algebra This full-year course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet Algebra-ready.This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in number and operations, expressions and equations, ratio and proportion, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study. Other Math 1.0
Algebra I This full-year course focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students’ understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students learn how they can use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. Algebra I 1.0
Geometry Offering a hands-on approach to instruction, this is an interactive course designed to introduce the basics of geometry through engaging lectures and informative lesson plans. Students will be challenged to apply previously learned knowledge to higher-level ideas such as reasoning and proof, Geometric Relationships, and Logic. This informative two-semester course covers fundamentals of shapes, surface area and volume of shapes, transformations, as well as learning strategies that include writing, analyzing, and using proofs. High-school students will gain valuable, tangential knowledge of more complex concepts, such as Trigonometry. Geometry 1.0
Algebra II This full-year course focuses on four critical areas of Algebra II: functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. Students will make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies between the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Practice standards and mathematical habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically. Algebra II 1.0
Pre-Calculus Exploring the relationship between advanced algebra topics and trigonometry, MA1104 is an informative introduction to calculus that challenges students to discover and comprehend the nature of graphs, nonlinear systems, and polynomial and rational functions. Encouraging logarithmic knowledge and application, this two-semester course for high school students covers many interesting and advanced subject areas in a thoughtful and supportive format, providing students a deeper understanding of topics, including limits, continuity, derivatives, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Other Math 1.0
Integrated Math I This course formalizes and extends middle-school mathematics, deepening their understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between Algebra and Geometry on the coordinate plane. Elective .5
Integrated Math II This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids. Elective .5
Integrated Math III This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles, developing the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world. Elective .5
Mathematical Model with Applications Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of MA4072 is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment loan models. Providing timely and highly useful content, this two-semester course is a must-have for any high school student. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts. Elective .5
Financial Math Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of MA4072 is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment loan models. Providing timely and highly useful content, this two-semester course is a must-have for any high school student. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts. Personal Financial Literacy .5
Trigonometry A one-semester course, Trigonometry is designed for students that have successfully completed a second year of algebra and desire to improve their analytic math abilities and understanding of trigonometry. During this in-depth study of trigonometry, students will utilize their geometry and algebra skills. Students will be required to express understanding using qualitative, quantitative, algebraic, and graphing skills. Throughout the course, students will manipulate trigonometric functions and apply them to numerous real-world situations. The course begins with a quick overview of right triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry and the unit circle. Students extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. This leads to the Laws of Sines and Cosines, followed by an in-depth exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. The course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s Theorem. Other Math 1.0

Science

Description College Preparatory/ Work Ready Credit Credit Value
Earth Space Science Students enrolled in this dynamic course will explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly more prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. Intended for middle school students, SC1113 is a two semester course that will provide a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and will examine how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system. Lab Science 1.0
Physical Science This full-year course focuses on traditional concepts in chemistry and physics, and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures, and leads students toward a clearer understanding of matter, energy, and the physical universe. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge in experiments that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Throughout the course, students solve problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically. Lab Science 1.0
Physics Combining scientific inquiry with advanced mathematics, SC1117 is a stimulating, two-semester high school-level course that will challenge students to understand and explain how energy, matter, and motion are all related. Engaging lessons introduce theories and experiments and encourage students to develop the knowledge and understanding necessary to support conclusions with numerical results. Inspiring students to relate knowledge to real-world applications, the course connects basic principles to more complex ideas in many fascinating areas: thermal energy, vibrations and waves, light and refraction, sound, electricity, and magnetism. Lab Science 1.0
Environmental Science This two-semester course encompasses six major units which cover many aspects of environmental science: Ecology; The Biosphere; The Land, Forests and Soil; The Water; Energy and Resources; and Societies and Policy. The course utilizes a two and/or three section lecture format to provide opportunities for mastery learning in smaller segments. Environmental Science contains Global Connections lessons which include unique activities that merge lesson material with real world issues pertaining to the environment. This course contains a variety of other activities such as vocabulary, online content, journals, practice/homework and skills lessons. Assessment questions in the form of a quiz follow each lesson and there is a summative exam following each topic. A cumulative exam concludes the end of each semester. Lab Science 1.0
Biology This compelling full-year course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. It encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. Lab Science 1.0
Chemistry This rigorous full-year course engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher-order thinking applications. The components of this course include the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Lab Science 1.0
Honors Environmental Science Students will identify and analyze environmental problems and create and propose solutions. This is a fast-paced, upper-level course designed for highly motivated students. Students will perform several offline College Board recommended labs. Multiple opportunities will be provided to enhance test-taking skills through critical reading, writing, classroom assignments, and discussion activities. Furthermore, practice assessments and essays are given throughout the course to emulate the testing environment. The course encompasses human population dynamics, interrelationships in nature, energy flow, resources, environmental quality, human impact on environmental systems, and environmental law. The assigned text for this course is Environmental Science: Earth as a Living Planet (7th Edition) by Daniel B. Botkin and Edward A. Keller (2009). *Materials are required for all student lab experiences. Please see Teacher Guide located in eCommunity for complete listing of these materials. Other Science 1.0*

History

US History I U.S. History I is a yearlong course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of the defining moments that paved the way for the United States of today. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. Recurring themes such as territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization, and the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of how these issues contributed to the Civil War and Reconstruction Elective 1.0
US History II U.S. History II is a yearlong course that examines the major events and turning points of US history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped US history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the United States’s rise to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives. US History 1.0
Survey Of American History This course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the Era of Exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped US history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization as they assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives. Elective .5
Survey of World History This year-long course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. Finally, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and modern issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. The course implements literacy skills by encouraging students to read and write in a variety of formats. Assignments and projects encourage students to apply critical-thinking skills and show their learning in a variety of modalities. Students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays. Other History 1.0
Modern World History This year-long course examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives. The course implements literacy skills by encouraging students to read and write in a variety of formats. Assignments and projects encourage students to apply critical thinking skills and show their learning in a variety of modalities. Students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays. Other History 1.0
US Government This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. In the second quarter, students build on this foundation as they explore the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process. The course culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy approaches. The course implements literacy skills by encouraging students to read and write in a variety of formats. Assignments and project-based lessons encourage students to apply critical thinking skills to scenarios, situations, and arguments. Students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing a full informative essay. Governement .5
Economics This semester-long course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives. The course helps students to master microeconomic and macroeconomic theory while discovering the characteristics of mixed-market economies. Then, students utilize their new understanding to analyze the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy. The course culminates by encouraging students to explore personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, economic theory is introduced, demonstrated, and reinforced through real-life scenarios and examples. In assignments and project-based lessons, students learn to apply critical thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Data, graphs, charts, maps, and other multimedia stimuli are closely analyzed in instruction and assignments. Students write routinely and responsively in shorter tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In a more extensive, process-based writing lesson, students write a topical essay in an argumentative format. Elective .5
Human Geography A year-long high school level course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems. Building upon the National Geography Standards, the course focuses on human understanding of the world and human social organization. The course explores the human environment interaction, and the interactions among human systems. Semester one introduces students to geographic concepts, theories, models, and methods. Students will develop geographic skills including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Students will apply their geographic and historical skills while studying physical geography of the major world regions, population and migration patterns, cultural and political systems. Throughout their study, students will examine current global issues that impact our world today. Semester two explores global connections: tracing the development of modern civilization and human systems from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution, and the development of the modern urban space. Students will analyze economic trends, and compare global markets and urban environments. Students will also examine the effects of technology on societies and environments, including human movement, communications, climate change, and pollution. Finally, students will identify challenges facing the modern world. Other History 1.0
Oklahoma History Custom course built by Edgenuity for Oklahoma. OK History .5
Honors Human Geography This fast-paced, upper-level course is designed for highly motivated students. Critical readings, writing activities, classroom assignments, and discussion activities provide multiple opportunities to develop a deep understanding of concepts and skills. The course asks students to differentiate among geographic concepts, theories, and models; to analyze relationships among human systems; to explore human-environment interactions; and to study the role of land use and economic development across time periods in various geographic regions. Other History 1.0*
Honors World History The goal of this course is to explore historical themes common to societies around the world and across time periods, from prehistory to the present day. Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay-writing, interpretation of original documents, and historiography. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, document-based questions, project-based activities, and practice exams. Other History 1.0*

Foreign Language

For credit foreign language courses are NCAA approved using the Middlebury curriculum listed here.

Course Description College Preparatory/ Work Ready Credit Credit Value
HS Spanish I High School Spanish I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Spanish-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world. High School Spanish I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Spanish I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Spanish II High School Spanish II is the second level of high school Spanish designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Spanish. Foreign Language 1.0
HS French I High School French I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to French-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Francophone world. High School French I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School French I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS French II High School French II is the second level of high school French designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate French. Foreign Language 1.0
HS German I High School German I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to German-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the German-speaking world. High School German I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School German I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS German II High School German II is the second level of high school German designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate German. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Chinese I High School Chinese I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Chinese-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Chinese-speaking world. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. High School Chinese I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Chinese I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Chinese II High School Chinese II is the second level of high school Chinese designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus and students are expected to learn several characters in each unit; however, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in overall comprehension. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, instruction is almost entirely in Chinese. High School Chinese II is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Chinese. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Latin I Foreign Language 1.0
HS Latin II Foreign Language 1.0

Electives

Description College Preparatory/ Work Ready Credit Credit Value
Art History Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, EL4002 offers high school students an indepth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course will cover topics including early Medieval and Romanesque art; art in the 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries; 15th-century art in Europe; 16th-century art in Italy; the master artists; high Renaissance and Baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; 18th- and 19th-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas. Fine Arts .5
Intro to Art Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, EL1086 encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, this one-semester course provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400. Fine Arts .5
Strategies for Academic Success Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, EL1087 encourages high school and middle school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques. Elective .5
Healthy Living A one-semester course designed to encourage students to make responsible, respectful, informed, and capable decisions about topics that affect the well-being of themselves and others. The course provides students with targeted and pertinent information, which they can utilize to develop healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Critical thinking and decisionmaking skills are taught and practiced throughout the course, as students are encouraged to recognize that they have the power to choose healthy behaviors in order to reduce risks. Areas to be explored include: making responsible decisions; communicating effectively; mental & emotional health; building self-esteem; adolescence relationships & responsibilities; drugs, alcohol and tobacco; human sexuality; families & family relationships; preventing abuse & violence; and peer pressure. Elective .5
Foundations of Personal Wellness A year long course which combines a wide range of health and fitness concepts, creating a comprehensive exploration of all aspects of wellness. The course uses pedagogical planning to ensure that as students investigate fitness and physical health, they are also learning about the nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle. The course fulfills both health and physical education standards at the state and national level. Elective 1.0
Lifetime Fitness A one-semester course that combines comprehensive online instruction with student participation in fitness activities. Throughout the course, students assess individual fitness levels according to the five components of physical fitness: cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Through the application of personal fitness assessments, students will design a fitness program to meet their individual fitness goals. Upon completion of the course, students will have the knowledge to stay fit and active throughout their lifetime. Areas to be explored include: safe exercising and injury prevention; cardiovascular health; muscular strength and endurance; flexibility; nutrition and weight management; lifetime fitness; consumer product evaluation; biomechanical principles; team and individual sports; and stress management Elective .5
Psychology This year-long course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps them master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students are exposed to the facts, concepts, and principles associated with the major fields within psychology through direct instruction, interactive activities, projects, and writing assignments. As they progress through each unit, students will analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological perspective, the psychosocial perspective, and the cognitive perspective. From a psychological point of view, students will investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. By using the scientific method, students will gain a practical understanding of common research methods. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions. This course is aligned with applicable state standards, the American Psychology Association’s National Standards for High School Psychology, and the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Elective 1.0
Intro to Business In this two‐semester introductory course, students will learn the principles of business using real‐ world examples by learning what it takes to plan and launch a product or service in today’s fast‐paced business environment. This course covers an introduction to economic basics, costs and profit, and different business types; techniques for managing money, personally and as a business, and taxes and credit; the basics of financing a business; how a business relates to society, locally and globally; how to identify a business opportunity; and techniques for planning, executing, and marketing a business to respond to that opportunity. This course is aligned with introductory business career and technical education frameworks in a variety of states. Elective 1.0
Intro to Health Science This yearlong course introduces students to careers in the health care industry, providing a solid foundation in career planning and job-specific skills for various health care professions. In addition to learning the key components of the U.S. healthcare system, students will learn terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathologies, diagnostic and clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions, and the fundamentals of medical emergency care. Throughout the course, instructional activities emphasize safety, professionalism, accountability, and efficiency for workers within the healthcare field. Students master skills through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and assessments. This course is intended to provide students with the core knowledge and skills that can be used in many areas of health science. This course is aligned with introductory health science career and technical education frameworks in a variety of states. Elective 1.0
Health Science Concepts This year-long course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology – including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students will learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students will investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways. This course is aligned with introductory health science career and technical education frameworks in a variety of states. Elective 1.0
Intro to Information Technology Introduction to Information Technology is a yearlong course that introduces students to the field of Information Technology (IT), including career options and job-specific skills for various IT positions. As they progress through each unit, students learn about networks, software, operating systems, HTML and computer programming. Throughout this course, students engage in variety of hands-on assignments, such as creating Web pages with HTML and CSS; creating and formatting spreadsheets; drawing and editing digital images; and using multiple search parameters to locate, sort, search, and filter data in a spreadsheet. Students learn through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and a variety of project-based assignments. This course provides students with a basic introduction to IT careers and the knowledge and skills required of workers in the exciting field of IT. This course is aligned with introductory IT career and technical education frameworks in a variety of states. Elective .5
Computer Applications Office 2007 Offering insight into the suite of products most used by working professionals, EL4082 challenges high school students to become proficient in Microsoft®, Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, and Outlook® through engaging lessons and coursework. This one-semester course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with tasks such as creating flyers, brochures, schedules, presentations, and mail merge. Elective .5
Carreer Planning and Development A one-semester course designed for upper level high school students, Career Planning and Development introduces students to the vast working world. Divided into four units, the course will help students: investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, develop skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce, explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. Throughout the course, students develop useful career documents, including a self-assessment profile, a cover letter and a résumé, using video and written step-by-step instructions. These documents can then be used by students in an educational or career portfolio. Elective .5
Honors Psychology This is a fast-paced, upper-level course designed for highly motivated students. Multiple opportunities will be provided in order to enhance testtaking skills through critical reading, writing, classroom assignments, and discussion activities. The course grants students an opportunity to increase knowledge concerning psychological theory and application. Areas to be covered include consciousness, learning, motivation, personality, and developmental psychology. The assigned texts for this course are Psychology: Themes and Variations, 7th edition, by Wayne Weiten, (2007) and Forty Studies that Changed Psychology: Explorations into the History of Psychological Research, 5th edition, by Roger Hock (2005). Elective 1.0*
Audio Engineering This semester‐long course introduces students to audio engineering. Students learn about the physics of sound, as well as techniques for protecting hearing while working with audio. Students will learn about the history of recording technologies, as well as techniques for evaluating audio hardware, such as microphones and speakers. Students will also learn about the four stages of professional music recording projects: recording, editing, mixing, and mastering. Using Audacity, an open‐source recording and mixing program, students will practice the techniques used by sound engineers to produce multitrack recordings. Students learn about the difference between proprietary, open‐ source, and free software licenses, as well as the most popular Digital Audio Workspace software used in the profession. Students will also learn about intellectual property issues involving audio, particularly when using other people’s music. Through a series of engaging hands‐on projects, students will learn the fundamental concepts of audio engineering. A series of interviews with professional audio engineers will give students a sense of the opportunities and requirements for pursuing careers in the field. This course is partially aligned to Washington State Recording Arts and Sound Reinforcement Tech CTE standards. Elective .5
3D Art I - Modeling This course will introduce students to 3D-modeling tools and concepts. Using Blender, the popular open-source 3D-modeling package, students will learn the basics of creating shapes, adding textures and lighting, and rendering. By the end of the course, students will have produced a series of increasingly sophisticated projects for their 3D portfolio, such as a house, a creature, and terrain. This course is suitable for students with no prior experience with 3D game design or digital media authoring tools, but it is recommended for students who are older. The course uses a difficult software program, and prior experience in 3D software may be helpful. Also, student computer speeds will greatly affect how long the course will take to complete. Elective .5
3D Art II - In this second‐semester course, students will build on the 3D‐modeling concepts and Blender software skills developed in 3D Art I to learn intermediate to advanced 3D‐animation techniques. Using Blender, the world’s most powerful open‐source modeling tool, students will master the basics of animation—trajectory, lighting, bones, and movement—while learning how to apply traditional animation techniques to their 3D models. By the end of the course, students will have a solid foundation for pursuing further 3D modeling and animation projects. This course is suitable for students with no prior experience with 3D game design or digital media authoring tools, but it is recommended for students who are older. The course uses a difficult software program, and prior experience in 3D software may be helpful. Also, student computer speeds will greatly affect how long the course will take to complete. Elective .5
Digital Arts I In Part 1 of this course, students will learn the seven elements of visual art: line, shape, form, color, value, space, and texture. Part 1 highlights historical artwork, focusing on the ways in which artists have used specific elements of visual art in a variety of ways. After surveying a variety of media and art, students will use digital drawing to apply the elements of visual art in their own work. They will discover career opportunities in the design, production, display, and presentation of digital artwork. Students will respond to the artwork of others and learn how to combine artistic elements to create finished pieces that effectively communicate ideas. The course assignments in Part 1 build toward a finished still‐life drawing that incorporates all seven elements of visual art. In Part 2 of this course, students will build on the skills and concepts learned in Part 1 to further develop a vocabulary of digital design elements. Part 2 includes a review of the skills and concepts learned in Part 1 to support the more advanced techniques described in Part 2. Students will learn about the principles of design and use them to create their own unique artwork. The principles of design include repetition, pattern, contrast, variety, movement, rhythm, proportion, balance, emphasis, dominance, unity, and harmony. By the end of Part 2, students will have created a collection of art projects for a digital design portfolio. The course assignments in Part 2 teach students how to analyze the use of principles of design in specific artwork, and then apply those principles in student work. Throughout this course, students will use Inkscape[LR1]™, a popular open‐source vector‐graphics software program, to complete the course projects. Elective .5
Digital Arts II In this one-semester introductory digital arts course, instruction will be split into two parts. In Part 1 of this course, students will learn the seven elements of visual art: line, shape, form, color, value, space, and texture. Part 1 highlights historical artwork, focusing on the ways in which artists have used specific elements of visual art in a variety of ways. After surveying a variety of media and art, students will use digital drawing to apply the elements of visual art in their own work. They will discover career opportunities in the design, production, display, and presentation of digital artwork. Students will respond to the artwork of others and learn how to combine artistic elements to create finished pieces that effectively communicate ideas. The course assignments in Part 1 build toward a finished still‐life drawing that incorporates all seven elements of visual art. In Part 2 of this course, students will build on the skills and concepts learned in Part 1 to further develop a vocabulary of digital design elements. Part 2 includes a review of the skills and concepts learned in Part 1 to support the more advanced techniques described in Part 2. Students will learn about the principles of design and use them to create their own unique artwork. The principles of design include repetition, pattern, contrast, variety, movement, rhythm, proportion, balance, emphasis, dominance, unity, and harmony. By the end of Part 2, students will have created a collection of art projects for a digital design portfolio. The course assignments in Part 2 teach students how to analyze the use of principles of design in specific artwork, and then apply those principles in student work. Throughout this course, students will use Inkscape[LR1]™, a popular open‐source vector‐graphics software program, to complete the course projects. Elective .5
Computer Science In this two-part, one-semester computer science course, students will learn the basics of programming through hands‐on projects that encourage creativity and experimentation. Students will apply key computer science concepts to programs created in and run by Python, a programming language with simple syntax and flexible, robust performance. Python runs on most operating systems and is used professionally to write web applications, desktop applications, and many other types of software programs. Students will learn about the real‐world experiences of computer science professionals through personal questionnaires. By the end of this course, students will have the conceptual background and many of the fundamental skills needed to get started as a programmer in Python or in any programming language. Project‐based learning walks students through writing code, and course assignments build on what they learn. Computer Technology .5
Computer Science II In this two-part, one-semester computer science course, students will learn the basics of programming through hands‐on projects that encourage creativity and experimentation. Students will apply key computer science concepts to programs created in and run by Python, a programming language with simple syntax and flexible, robust performance. Python runs on most operating systems and is used professionally to write web applications, desktop applications, and many other types of software programs. Students will learn about the real‐world experiences of computer science professionals through personal questionnaires. By the end of this course, students will have the conceptual background and many of the fundamental skills needed to get started as a programmer in Python or in any programming language. Project‐based learning walks students through writing code, and course assignments build on what they learn. Computer Technology .5
Intro to Entrepreneurship I In this one-semester introductory business course, students will learn what it takes to be an entrepreneur while mastering the basics of planning and launching a successful business. Whether students are interested in starting a money-making business or creating a nonprofit to help others, this course will help them develop core skills needed to be successful. Some of these core skills include learning how to come up with new business ideas, how to attract investors, how to market a business, and how to manage expenses. Students will be inspired by stories from teen entrepreneurs who have turned their ideas into reality, and will have the opportunity to plan and execute their own business ideas. Part 1 of this course covers the role of entrepreneurship in society and how to pursue entrepreneurship as a career; an introduction to economic principles related to business and industry; and an exploration of the process of starting, organizing, and promoting a new business. Part 2 of this course covers microeconomic concepts on how businesses strategize on sales and pricing; topics in personal finance, including how to manage personal credit; accounting, taxes, and laws that affect small businesses; the ways in which culture, globalization, and technology affect the success of an entrepreneurial venture; and positive workplace skills that students can apply on the job. Elective .5
Intro to Entrepreneurship II In this one-semester introductory business course, students will learn what it takes to be an entrepreneur while mastering the basics of planning and launching a successful business. Whether students are interested in starting a money-making business or creating a nonprofit to help others, this course will help them develop core skills needed to be successful. Some of these core skills include learning how to come up with new business ideas, how to attract investors, how to market a business, and how to manage expenses. Students will be inspired by stories from teen entrepreneurs who have turned their ideas into reality, and will have the opportunity to plan and execute their own business ideas. Part 1 of this course covers the role of entrepreneurship in society and how to pursue entrepreneurship as a career; an introduction to economic principles related to business and industry; and an exploration of the process of starting, organizing, and promoting a new business. Part 2 of this course covers microeconomic concepts on how businesses strategize on sales and pricing; topics in personal finance, including how to manage personal credit; accounting, taxes, and laws that affect small businesses; the ways in which culture, globalization, and technology affect the success of an entrepreneurial venture; and positive workplace skills that students can apply on the job. Elective .5
Game Design This one‐semester course is intended for students who love gaming and want to design and build original games from beginning to end. Students will learn how to use Multimedia Fusion 2, a popular game design software program, to create engaging, interactive games in a variety of genres. In addition, students will get a solid foundation in the basic concepts of game development. By the end of this course, students will have a variety of polished games ready for a game‐development portfolio. Step‐by‐step instruction guides students through various game‐design projects as they learn how to use Multimedia Fusion 2. Each section of the course is followed by an assignment that builds upon the skills students learned in that section. In each assignment, students will use the skills learned in the step‐by‐step instruction to customize the look and feel of each section’s game. This course does not align to any known state standards. Elective .5
Engineering Design I Designers and manufacturers in virtually every industry use computer‐aided design systems to create engineering design solutions. In Part 1 of this one‐semester course, students will master the basics of CAD software: creating points, lines, geometric forms, isometric drawings, and 3D models. Students will learn how to translate initial concepts into functional designs and 3D walkthroughs. Students will explore career options for engineers and CAD designers. In Part 2 of this course, students will continue to develop the engineering and computer‐aided design skills gained in Part 1. Students will continue to explore the principles of 2D and 3D modeling and design using Creo™ Elements/Direct™ Modeling Personal Edition, and build on the math and reasoning skills essential to engineering. The hands‐on experience students will gain through completing design challenges, product analyses, and more will equip them with the tools engineers need to succeed. This course includes instructions on how to create standardized drawings using basic CAD tools; interpret 3D and 2D views of objects; produce orthographic, auxiliary, and section drawings; create a set of working drawings meant to be viewed by clients; manipulate both 2D and 3D objects in a 3D environment; perform in‐depth product analysis; and dimension objects. This course also covers an overview of the design process and the mathematical skills used in 2D and 3D geometry. Elective .5
Engineering Design II Designers and manufacturers in virtually every industry use computer‐aided design systems to create engineering design solutions. In Part 1 of this one‐semester course, students will master the basics of CAD software: creating points, lines, geometric forms, isometric drawings, and 3D models. Students will learn how to translate initial concepts into functional designs and 3D walkthroughs. Students will explore career options for engineers and CAD designers. In Part 2 of this course, students will continue to develop the engineering and computer‐aided design skills gained in Part 1. Students will continue to explore the principles of 2D and 3D modeling and design using Creo™ Elements/Direct™ Modeling Personal Edition, and build on the math and reasoning skills essential to engineering. The hands‐on experience students will gain through completing design challenges, product analyses, and more will equip them with the tools engineers need to succeed. This course includes instructions on how to create standardized drawings using basic CAD tools; interpret 3D and 2D views of objects; produce orthographic, auxiliary, and section drawings; create a set of working drawings meant to be viewed by clients; manipulate both 2D and 3D objects in a 3D environment; perform in‐depth product analysis; and dimension objects. This course also covers an overview of the design process and the mathematical skills used in 2D and 3D geometry. Elective .5
Sociology Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, EL1120 is an engaging one-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course, designed for high-school students, covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times. Elective .5
Career Explorations This semester-length course prepares middle and high school students to make informed decisions about their future academic and occupational goals. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn how to assess their own skills and interests, explore industry clusters and pathways, and develop plans for career and academic development. This course is designed to provide flexibility for students; any number of units can be selected to comprise a course that meets the specific needs of each student’s skills and interests. Elective .5
Pharmacy Technician This two-semester course prepares students for employment as a Certified Pharmacy Technician (CPhT), and covers the skills needed for the pharmacy technician field. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students learn the basics of pharmacy assisting, including various pharmacy calculations and measurements, pharmacy law, pharmacology, medical terminology and abbreviations, medicinal drugs, sterile techniques, USP 795 and 797 standards, maintenance of inventory, patient record systems, data processing automation in the pharmacy, and employability skills. Successful completion of this course prepares the student for national certification for employment as a Certified Pharmacy Technician. Elective 1.0
Nursing Assistant This two-semester course prepares students to provide and assist with all aspects of activities of daily living and medical care for the adult patient in hospital, long-term care, and home settings. Through direct instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and practice assignments, students are taught the basics of nurse assisting, including interpersonal skills, medical terminology, care procedures, legal and ethical responsibilities, safe and efficient work, gerontology, nutrition, emergency skills, and employability skills. Successful completion of this course from an approved program prepares the student for state certification for employment as a Nursing Assistant. Elective 1.0
Medical Terminology This semester-long course introduces students to the structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, and singular and plural forms, plus medical abbreviations and acronyms. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to healthcare settings, medical procedures, pharmacology, human anatomy and physiology, and pathology. The knowledge and skills gained in this course will provide students entering the healthcare field with a deeper understanding of the application of the language of health and medicine. Students are introduced to these skills through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. Elective 1.0
Microsoft Office Specialist This two-semester course introduces students to the features and functionalities of Microsoft® Office® 2010 while preparing them for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification program. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, practice assignments, and unit-level assessments, students become proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Outlook. By the end of the course, students are prepared to take one or more MOS certification exams. Elective 1.0
Computer Applications This one-semester course introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely used productivity software in the world: Microsoft® Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office® 2010 documents for both personal and professional use. By the end of this course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the most common tools and features of the Microsoft® Office® 2010 suite of applications: Word®, Excel®, PowerPoint®, and Outlook®. Elective .5