BrightThinker

BrightThinker’s highly successful precision mastery-based model informs and creates a perfect environment for personalized learning.

BrightThinker offers a true academic accelerator with dynamic, media-rich, eCurriculum in core and elective subjects. BrightThinker bases its Precision, Mastery-Based Personalized Learning on four teaching methods: Connectional, Elevational, Directional, and Positional.

Click any of the links below to view course descriptions.

Grades 3-8

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
3rd Grade English Language ArtsLanguage ArtsThis course provides students instruction and practice in reading, comprehending, and analyzing various genres. Students will also learn skills to become stronger writers while creating texts for various purposes. Students will complete basic research tasks. In addition, students will learn spelling, grammar, and conventions to strengthen their writing. They will also learn and practice skills and strategies to build their vocabulary. Students will further their communication skills by listening, speaking, and working with peers. Students will also learn and utilize cursive writing.
3rd Grade MathMath The primary focal areas in 3rd Grade Math are place value, operations of whole numbers, and understanding fractional units. Students will learn the purpose of rounding numbers and learn to identify values on a number line. Students will perform the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. They will learn and practice multiplication through 10. They will also learn to model division in different ways, including grouping and using arrays. The mathematical strands of algebraic reasoning, geometry and measurement, and data analysis are presented and practiced. The use of tables, graphs, and charts is thoroughly explained, and concepts of financial literacy are also covered.
3rd Grade ScienceScienceThe study of science in 3rd Grade includes conducting descriptive investigations using scientific methods, analyzing data, and making tables and graphs. Students use tools such as collecting nets, sound recorders, and spring scales to collect, analyze, and record information. In this integrated science course, students explore many scientific concepts and will perform tasks such as measuring physical properties of matter; describing the forms of energy; investigating how forces cause change; describing rapid changes to Earth’s surface; comparing different landforms; creating models of the solar system; understanding the structures of living organisms and how they interact with each other and the environment; and comparing life cycles of different plants and animals.
3rd Grade Social StudiesSocial Studies 3rd Grade Oklahoma Studies introduces the student to the amazing history and culture of Oklahoma. The course begins with a primer on social studies skills such as reading maps. Students then explore the diverse geographic regions of Oklahoma. Civics and government are the focus of module 2. This is followed by Oklahoma history, beginning with the state’s prehistory and early contact between Native Americans and Europeans. Students will learn how the Trail of Tears brought the Five Tribes to Oklahoma and then survey the rapid chain of events that transformed Oklahoma from frontier to statehood. After covering recent historical events, the course concludes with a look at Oklahoma’s economic industries and cultural contributions.
4th Grade English Language ArtsLanguage ArtsCovering 4th Grade ELAR objectives, this course builds upon third-grade skills and vocabulary development. The focus is reading comprehension of main ideas, details, and themes. Students also keep a reading journal and compare different genre elements. Students write narratives and various essays, including a persuasive essay and an informative research paper. They also evaluate graphic elements, media, and speeches. In the area of cooperative learning, students practice good listening and discussion skills. Additionally, they use technology to make a presentation and self-evaluate their performance.
4th Grade MathMath The primary focal areas in 4th Grade Math are use of operations, fractions and decimals, and describing and analyzing geometry and measurement. Students will practice multiplication and divide 4-digit numbers by single digit divisors. They will also learn about estimating quotients. Students will learn and practice addition and subtraction of fractions. Algebraic concepts will include working with equations and solving multi-step problems. Perimeter and area problems will also be performed. Financial literacy topics are also covered.
4th Grade ScienceScienceThe study of science in 4th Grade includes conducting descriptive investigations using scientific methods, analyzing data, and making graphs. Students use tools such as beakers, compasses, and balances to collect, analyze, and record information. In this integrated science course, students explore many scientific concepts and will perform tasks such as measuring physical properties of matter, predicting how matter changes with heating and cooling, describing the forms of energy and its cycles, understanding slow changes to Earth’s surface, recognizing weather patterns and using weather maps, understanding the structures and relationships of living organisms and their environment, illustrating and comparing life cycles of different plants and animals, and investigating patterns in the Sun, Earth, Moon system including shadows and lunar phases.
4th Grade Social StudiesSocial Studies The theme of 4th Grade Social Studies is community and geography. Students will compare and contrast different types of communities and discover how cultural diversity adds richness and meaning to life in communities. As the course progresses, students will be introduced to the concept of living in a larger world community. They will learn about heroic men and women who overcame adversity and made their communities better places to live. Students will apply map-reading skills and examine source documents that will help them place communities and events in geographical and historical context. Students will learn that they have a responsibility to improve their communities and will identify ways to participate through nonprofit groups, government, and the free enterprise system.
5th Grade English Language ArtsLanguage ArtsAll standard conventions of English grammar are thoroughly covered. Vocabulary and spelling are spiraled throughout and include word roots, affixes, use of the dictionary, and using context. Students will read and analyze all major genres and be asked to imitate each in their own writing. Students analyze the novel Number the Stars. The students compose all forms of writing required by the state standards and are given detailed instructions in formal research and essays. A section on media literacy is included. Many lessons require peercollaboration. Fluency in reading aloud is taught overtly.
5th Grade MathMath 5th Grade Math will develop students’ mathematical problem-solving skills. Beginning with an overview of place values, students will learn to regroup numbers and estimate sums and differences. Students will learn to multiply and divide numbers with more than one digit. Proficiency will be gained in adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing fractions and whole numbers. Students will solve problems using basic numerical and algebraic expressions. Geometry includes lines, angles, polygons, and polyhedrons. Customary and metric measurements will be used to solve problems. Students will organize and present mathematical data using line graphs, scatterplots, bar graphs, and other visual aids. The course concludes with application of math skills in the study of financial concepts.
5th Grade ScienceScienceThe study of science in 5th Grade includes conducting descriptive and experimental investigations using scientific methods, analyzing data, and making models. Students use tools such as beakers, magnets, and spring scales to collect, analyze, and record information. In this integrated science course, students classify matter by its physical properties; describe the forms of energy and its cycles; investigate how forces cause change; diagram changes to Earth’s surface; compare Earth’s renewable and nonrenewable resources; understand the structures of living organisms and how they interact with each other and the environment; and recognize patterns in the Sun, Earth, Moon system.
5th Grade Social StudiesSocial Studies The 5th Grade Social Studies students will engage in a broad survey of U.S. history. Beginning with the discovery of the Western Hemisphere during the Age of Discovery, students will follow the transformation of the United States from a wilderness in the 17th century to a world power during the 20th century. Students will examine founding documents and analyze how government, political parties, and the free enterprise system have shaped the development of the United States. Geographical skills will be tested as students memorize the location of all 50 states and the names of their capitals. In addition, students will examine their rights and duties as citizens and analyze the impact of technology and culture on the lives of Americans.
6th Grade English Language ArtsLanguage ArtsThis course provides an overview in reading/comprehension of various genres including fiction and non-fiction. Students read the novel Hatchet by Gary Paulsen and analyze the main character’s development. Various activities emphasize informative and fiction writing, including planning, research, use of organizers, drafting, revision, and editing. Instruction also includes grammar basics and mechanics such as combining sentences and using correct punctuation. Analytical exercises consist of comparing genres, evaluating media, and identifying and using persuasion. Additionally, students practice necessary life skills such as communication and presentation, reflecting on the importance of collaboration in teamwork.
6th Grade MathMath This course focuses on using ratios to describe proportional relationships involving number, geometry, measurement, and probability and adding and subtracting decimals and fractions.
6th Grade ScienceScience6th Grade Science is an integrated course surveying essential concepts in physics, geology, chemistry, astronomy, and biology. Students will investigate elements and compounds, while learning the basics of chemistry. Students will examine different forms of energy and the laws of motion. An investigation of the structure of earth will precede a study of the characteristics and properties of rocks, minerals, and fossils. A study of astronomy, including galaxies, stars, and the solar system will provide a context in which students will consider the history and future of space exploration. The course concludes with an inquiry into cells, classification, and ecology. Throughout the course, there are lab investigations, including video labs, to reinforce science concepts and skills.
6th Grade Social StudiesSocial Studies The World Cultures course seeks to expand the knowledge of students beyond their local community to appreciate the diversity of the world at large. The course begins with a survey of ancient civilizations and the development of the Middle East’s three major religions. In unit 2, students will study the classical foundations of Western civilization and survey European nations. Unit 3 surveys American history, culture, and the role of citizens. The remainder of the course takes students on a whirlwind tour of dozens of many nations around the world, exploring the history, geography, governmental systems, customs, and cuisine of each.
7th Grade English Language ArtsLanguage ArtsIn this course, students will learn and apply new skills in reading, writing, and oral communication. Students will consider the importance of establishing a purpose in reading and identifying themes. Reading assignments include short stories, myths, legends, true stories, and expository texts. Students will read and critique the historical novel Chasing Lincoln’s Killer. Students will plan, draft, revise, proofread, edit, and publish a fictional narrative and an expository essay. Students will research reliable sources in order to create a research essay and accompanying multimedia presentation. Exploring the poetic devices of sensory and figurative language, students will create a poem of their own. Students will develop oral communication skills by preparing and presenting persuasive and instructional speeches. The course finishes with an investigation of communication in teamwork and collaboration.
7th Grade MathMath This course reviews many concepts of mathematics, and it introduces new concepts of graphing and financial information. Students work with sets and subsets, rational and irrational numbers, and exponents. Other topics include order of operations, additive inverses, and a thorough treatment of decimals. Algebraic concepts include ratios, rates, proportions, equations, and inequalities. Geometry concepts include triangles, circles, and circumferences. Students are taught graphing concepts such as plotting in different forms. Probability is covered, as well as financial topics, including interest, taxes, and budgeting.
7th Grade ScienceScienceThe 7th Grade Science course will deepen students’ understanding of life science. The course begins with the basic building blocks of life—cells. A unit on genetics will challenge students to investigate how DNA, genes, and proteins affect reproduction. Students will learn about different life processes and the importance of the water, nitrogen, and carbon cycles. Students will analyze the effect of climate and weather on life and the environment. An investigation into human body systems, including the skeletal, respiratory, and immune systems, precedes the concluding unit on ecology where students will learn how living things interact with their environments. Throughout the course, there are lab investigations to reinforce science concepts and skills.
7th Grade Social StudiesSocial Studies This course introduces students to basic geography of the continents, including boundaries, rivers, and landforms. Students are introduced to the early history of people groups, including civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and China, and the foundations of western civilization: ancient Greece and Rome. The languages, art, literature, societies, and way of life of these cultures are covered. The rise and fall of world kingdoms is discussed, ending with the fall of Rome in 476. Further studies into subsequent civilizations include the Byzantine Empire, rise of nations, and events in the world through the Renaissance and Reformation. Information is presented concerning the rise of many different world cultures.
8th Grade English Language ArtsLanguage ArtsThis course will expand students’ reading horizons and communication skills. Investigating narrative, epic, lyric, and free verse poetry, students will develop an appreciation for the sound, structure, and language of poetry. Students will better understand the elements of literature after reading O. Henry’s “A Retrieved Reformation,” Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, and William Gibson’s The Miracle Worker. Writing projects include creating a personal narrative, a procedural text, and a multimedia research presentation. Students will examine various forms of media and learn to distinguish bias when evaluating a persuasive text. Presenting a persuasive speech, participating in a debate, and practicing formal and informal speaking and listening will enhance students’ communication skills.
8th Grade Social StudiesSocial Studies This course employs an integrative approach to the teaching of U.S. history with an emphasis on geography, government, economics, culture, science, and technology. Students will learn how early explorations and development of the first colonies led to the union of 13 states as one nation. Students will examine and analyze important founding documents including the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. A survey of the events will reveal how Americans embraced the idea of Manifest Destiny and expanded the nation across North America. Students will follow and analyze the complex issues leading up to the American Civil War. The course concludes with a look at post-war issues.
8th Grade MathMath This course emphasizes the application of mathematics to real-life scenarios, helping the student to build skills in problem solving. Its topics include expressions, equations, relationships, proportions, geometric shapes, measurements, and the use of information. Emphasis is given to the interpretation and creation of graphs and charts that express, describe, and apply data. Students are also given instruction in finance, especially in the area of personal financial literacy. This course ensures that students have mastered the basic skills needed to enter high school mathematics courses.
8th Grade ScienceScience8th Grade Science will challenge students with an integrated study of earth, physical, and biological sciences. Students will analyze the relationship between the Earth, Sun, and Moon. Students will better understand the changing earth as they survey physical processes, such as erosion and weathering and the characteristics of rocks and minerals. A unit on oceanography will introduce students to geological, chemical, and biological aspects of the ocean. Students will consider the fundamentals of matter and energy along with the application of energy, force, and motion in physics. Units on plant and animal biology will introduce students to the importance of habitats and earth cycles in sustaining life. The course concludes with a look at the human impact on earth. Throughout the course, there are lab investigations to reinforce science concepts and skills.
English DiagnosticEnglishThe English Diagnostic is designed for students who are entering the 9th Grade. The purpose of the Diagnostic is to assess if the student is ready for high school material as well as to provide remediation for areas as needed. The Diagnostic consists of several English language categories. In each category, there is a pretest, remediation, and posttest. If students pass the pretest, they will immediately go on to the next category pretest. If students do not pass the pretest, they will complete remediation, and then complete a posttest. If the posttest is passed, they will go on to the next category of pretest. This is a diagnostic course to show HS preparedness. It does not fall in a 'semester/full year category'. This is a great tool to assign to 8th grade students to identify gaps and provide remediation before entering High School.
Math DiagnosticMathThe Math Diagnostic is designed for students who are entering the 9th Grade. The purpose of the Diagnostic is to assess if the student is ready for high school material as well as to provide remediation for areas as needed. The Diagnostic consists of several math categories. In each category, there is a pretest, remediation, and posttest. If students pass the pretest, they will immediately go on to the next category pretest. If students do not pass the pretest, they will complete the remediation coursework. Once remediation has been completed, students will take a posttest. If the posttest is passed, they will go on to the next category of pretest. This is a diagnostic course to show HS preparedness. It does not fall in a 'semester/full year category'. This is a great tool to assign to 8th grade students to identify gap and provide remediation before entering High School.

High School

Language Arts

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
English DiagnosticEnglishThe English Diagnostic is designed for students who are entering the 9th Grade. The purpose of the Diagnostic is to assess if the student is ready for high school material as well as to provide remediation for areas as needed. The Diagnostic consists of several English language categories. In each category, there is a pretest, remediation, and posttest. If students pass the pretest, they will immediately go on to the next category pretest. If students do not pass the pretest, they will complete remediation, and then complete a posttest. If the posttest is passed, they will go on to the next category of pretest. This is a diagnostic course to show HS preparedness. It does not fall in a 'semester/full year category'. This is a great tool to assign to 8th grade students to identify gaps and provide remediation before entering High School. 0
English I EnglishEnglish I launches a four-year journey during which students will confidently master grammar, develop advanced communication skills, and learn to analyze and appreciate challenging literature. The course begins with grammar fundamentals including sentence structure, parts of speech, and phrases and clauses. Students’ vocabulary will expand through a study of technology, literary terms, and words with multiple meanings. Culturally diverse texts will emphasize literary elements and techniques while an overview of short and long prose will delve into excerpts from The Odyssey. Reading Animal Farm and Romeo and Juliet will expand the students’ literary world. Writing skills will advance as students learn and apply the steps for creating a research paper. The course includes coverage of effective speaking and listening.1 (2 semesters)
English IIEnglishEnglish II begins with a major focus on grammar to help students become stronger writers. Students then analyze literary genre elements in various excerpts of classical stories. A major focus is the Greek drama, Antigone, by Sophocles. The novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee is required with this course to study for analysis, as well. Students compare informational texts and have various writing projects. For example, they write an analytical essay on a short story and a persuasive essay that they also present as a speech. Their research paper is about a topic they choose on the Civil Rights Movement in which they construct a multi-media presentation to accompany it. Additionally, this course includes work-related documents with students constructing their own resumés and letters.1 (2 semesters)
English IIIEnglishIn English III, students focus on the development of American Literature and compare it with ideas and forms of literature around the world. Students review the basics of the language arts, then scaffold with practices of increasing complexity to meet the required grade-level objectives of analytical thinking. Engaging in a step-by- step process, students learn to write complex analyses and argumentative papers. Students also learn principles in research, teamwork, discussion, and presentation skills. The text that should accompany the course is the musical, Fiddler on the Roof, by Joseph Stein. This play highlights literary devices as well as the ideas of immigration and cultural assimilation with supporting literature. Additionally, students explore college and career planning as well as tips for dealing with information in technology today.1 (2 semesters)
English IVEnglishEnglish IV emphasizes the interpretation of various types of literature from different time periods. The genres covered include fiction, drama, and poetry. The dramatic play Cyrano de Bergerac is read and studied for its use of language to convey dilemmas and themes. Poetry studies include a survey of British poetry as well as ancient and modern poetry from various cultures and in various periods. Students are also given a wide range of writing assignments. For example, students produce a fiction story and a script. They also write essays evaluating literary elements. The course also includes research and writing arguments with logic. These various writing assignments help prepare students for end-of-course and SAT essay writing. Coverage is also given to analyzing and evaluating media and speeches, as well as using presentation and discussion skills.1 (2 semesters)

Math

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
Algebra I MathStudents build on the foundational concepts presented in Grades K-8. Algebraic thinking and symbolic reasoning play a critical role in algebra. Since functions provide the foundation of Algebra I and Algebra II, this course uses a “function” approach as it provides the student opportunities to solve problems in real life situations. The study of functions, equations and their relationships is central to all of mathematics. Students perceive functions and equations as a means for analyzing and understanding a broad variety of relationships and as a useful tool for expressing generalizations. Students perceive the connections between algebra and geometry and use the tools of one to help solve problems in the other. Students use concrete, pictorial, numerical, symbolic, graphical, and verbal tools and technology to model mathematical situations to solve meaningful problems. The course is not totally dependent upon a graphing calculator, but it is used extensively throughout the year.1 (2 semesters)
Geometry Math This course, dealing primarily with two-dimensional Euclidean geometry and solid geometry, promotes the development of logical reasoning skills and is useful in many life situations. Beginning with the fundamental concepts of line segments and angles, students will progress to conditional statements, geometric and algebraic proofs, and line relationships. In studying polygons, students will learn the properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles along with geometrical concepts including the Pythagorean Theorem and the relationship of pi (π) to circumference and area in a circle. In the study of solid geometry, students will learn how to determine area and volume for prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres. Students will apply learned geometric skills in working with ratios, similarities, transformations, and symmetry before concluding the course with an inquiry into the fundamentals of trigonometry.1 (2 semesters)
Algebra IIMathAlgebra II will consolidate and build on students’ knowledge acquired in Algebra I. After a review of Algebra I concepts, students will take an in-depth look at linear equations, inequalities, and functions. Students will be introduced to matrices, apply Cramer’s Rule in solving linear systems, and solve graphs and equations of conic sections. Using graphs, factoring, and the quadratic formula, students will solve quadratic equations, inequalities, and functions. Students will investigate how to graph, factor, invert, and solve polynomials, as well as solve rational expressions, radical expressions, fractional exponents, and rational inequalities. Students will examine the properties, transformations, and applications of exponential and logarithmic functions. Applying probability and data analysis, students will determine probability and model data. The final unit will present trigonometric concepts to prepare students advancing to trigonometry.1 (2 semesters)
Precalculus Math Precalculus explores a wide variety of mathematical concepts with the goal of preparing students for calculus or other college-level math courses. A review of number properties, factoring, the quadratic formula, and the Cartesian coordinate system will prepare students for advanced math concepts. Students will use graphing calculators to plot graphs, and solve equations. Students will learn to solve a variety of problems including parent functions, transformations, even and odd functions, domain and range, operations, linear functions, regression, correlation, quadratic functions, polynomials, asymptotes, and exponential, logistic, and logarithmic functions. Trigonometric studies include angle measurement, arc length, functions, reciprocal and quotient identities, Pythagorean identities, sines, and cosines. Sequences and series precede inquiries into the characteristics and applications of conic sections and vectors. The course concludes with an investigation into parametric equations and polar equations.1 (2 semesters)
Math Models MathThe Math Models course applies mathematical concepts to real-life situations. The course begins with a review of basic math concepts before presenting an overview of geometry, probability and statistics, and problem solving. Students will learn to conduct and analyze research by collecting and describing data using graphs and models that find application in disciplines as diverse as science, trigonometry, art, architecture, and music. Students will employ theoretical, empirical, and binomial probability to predict the likelihood of outcomes. Using math models, students will better understand personal finance issues including compensation, budgeting, taxes, bank accounts, and compound interest. Applying math models to analyze the pros and cons of credit cards, renting or purchasing a home, leasing or purchasing a vehicle, and investments and insurance will enable students to be smarter consumers.1 (2 semesters)
Math DiagnosticMathThe Math Diagnostic is designed for students who are entering the 9th Grade. The purpose of the Diagnostic is to assess if the student is ready for high school material as well as to provide remediation for areas as needed. The Diagnostic consists of several math categories. In each category, there is a pretest, remediation, and posttest. If students pass the pretest, they will immediately go on to the next category pretest. If students do not pass the pretest, they will complete the remediation coursework. Once remediation has been completed, students will take a posttest. If the posttest is passed, they will go on to the next category of pretest. This is a diagnostic course to show HS preparedness. It does not fall in a 'semester/full year category'. This is a great tool to assign to 8th grade students to identify gap and provide remediation before entering High School.0

Science

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
PhysicsPhysicsIn this course, students will learn physics concepts, including matter and energy, motion and force, speed, velocity, and acceleration in order to better understand how the universe behaves. A survey of the historical development of physics as a foundational branch of science will lead to recognition of the contributions of Newton, Einstein, Planck, and others. Students will apply physics concepts as they study gravity and acceleration, momentum, motion, and energy. The concepts of work and power will become evident as students learn how machines use torque and force to accomplish work. Students will recognize the roles of each fundamental force and will investigate electrostatics, thermodynamics, wave forms, particles, and quantum physics. Following an examination of the nucleus, radioactivity, fission, and fusion, the course concludes with the theories of special and general relativity. Throughout the course, there are lab investigations, including video labs, to reinforce science concepts and skills.1 (2 semesters)
Integrated Physics and Chemistry (Physical Science)Physical ScienceIn IPC, students will learn many fascinating chemistry and physics concepts. Students have a brief introduction to the scientific method, lab safety, and the metric system. The study of chemistry begins with the atomic theory and the Periodic Table, applying theory to develop chemical formulas and balance equations. The course includes investigations into acids and bases, gas laws, and nuclear chemistry. Students explore Newton’s laws of motion and other physics concepts including mass, force, motion, velocity, acceleration, gravity, and energy. A study of electricity and magnetism, simple machines, the laws of thermodynamics, and energy waves rounds out the physics portion of the course. Throughout the course, there are lab investigations, including video labs, to reinforce science concepts and skills.1 (2 semesters)
ChemistryChemistryA foundational branch of physical science, the principles and laws of chemistry find many applications in business, technology, health care, and other fields outside traditional scientific areas. Beginning with a look at measurements, calculations, data analysis, and the scientific method, students will investigate the properties of elements, compounds, and mixtures. A survey of the history of theories of atomic structure will lead students to Mendeléev’s periodic table and an inspection of periodic law. Next, students will apply atomic theory in the study of molecular and chemical bonding interactions through chemical formulas, reactions, and stoichiometry. Students’ knowledge will expand as they learn about the states of matter, gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, thermochemistry and reaction kinetics, and oxidation- reduction reactions. The course concludes with inquiries into organic chemistry, biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Throughout the course, there are lab investigations, including video labs, to reinforce science concepts and skills.1 (2 semesters)
BiologyBiologyIn Biology, students will develop appreciation for the living world. A brief history of biology followed by an investigation of the basic unit of life—the cell—will prepare students for deeper research. Students will explore topics concerning genetics, including meiosis, heredity, and DNA. Students will consider natural selection, origin of life theories, and the mechanics of evolution. An exploration of “little critters” such as bacteria precedes a study of plant structures, processes, and reproduction. Students will inquire into animal behavior and characteristics as they study invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, among others. An inspection of nutrition and disease will lead students to examine human body systems. The course will conclude with an analysis of the interdependence of living things in ecosystems.1 (2 semesters)
Anatomy and PhysiologyOther ScienceAnatomy and Physiology introduces students to the structures and functions of the amazing human body. Students will learn about different organ systems and how they work together to maintain life. Some of these organ systems include the circulatory, digestive, skin, reproductive, and respiratory systems. Students will examine different diseases that affect these systems and the treatments (both traditional and new) used to fight the diseases. The development and effects of aging on the different organ systems are explored throughout Anatomy and Physiology.1 (2 semesters)
Aquatic Science Lab ScienceIn Aquatic Science students will test, predict, and learn about water and things pertaining to water. The first unit will guide students to think of water as a system. Learning the chemistry and physics of water, students will complete a course project by applying scientific methods to collect and analyze data on a local body of water. A survey of the physical properties of the ocean, including their formation and composition, will precede an inquiry into how the atmosphere and sun interact with the hydrosphere to create weather. Students will examine the elements and properties of aquatic ecosystems, including aquatic biology and marine and freshwater ecosystems. In the final unit, students will consider the relationship between humans and water, including challenges such as population growth competing for resources with agriculture and industry.1 (2 semesters)
Medical MicrobiologyLab ScienceMedical Microbiology explores the world of tiny (micro) organisms that are responsible for making people sick. Students learn about the common bacteria, viruses, and protists that cause sickness and disease in humans. Medical Microbiology delves into different ways these germs and diseases can spread from person to person, throughout a community, and eventually around the globe while discussing the best practices for stopping them from spreading. Students look into different medications and how they work to kill or slow the growth of different microorganisms. Students will also research why some antibiotic medications are no longer effective against the bacteria that cause disease. Medical microbiology also teaches laboratory skills in how to effectively grow and isolate different colonies of microorganisms in petri dishes.1 (2 semesters)

History

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
EconomicsEconomicsThe Economics course begins with a survey of the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services within the free enterprise system. Students will examine the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses, analyze the interaction of supply, demand, and price, and study the role of financial institutions. Types of business ownership, market structures, and basic concepts of consumer economics will be surveyed. The impact of a variety of factors including geography, government intervention, economic philosophies, historic documents, societal values, scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the national economy, and economic policy will be an integral part of the course. Students will apply critical- thinking skills to create economic models and to evaluate economic activity patterns. Students will also examine the knowledge and skills necessary as self-supporting adults to make critical decisions relating to personal financial matters such as seeking college financial aid, using credit wisely, and balancing financial accounts.1 semester
World GeographyHistoryIn World Geography, students will learn the six essentials of geography: spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and uses of geography. After a broad survey of Earth’s structure, hydrosphere, and climates, the focus of each unit narrows to a particular region of the world. By examining the physical geography of each region, including water resources, climate, vegetation, and natural resources, students will understand the influence of geography on economic activities, human culture, and history. In addition, students will investigate the impact of human activity on the environment, including pollution and development, and consider the implications.1 (2 semesters)
World History HistoryWorld History is a survey of the development of civilizations from prehistoric times to the present. The journey begins with ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia, Egypt, and China, and the foundations of western civilization: ancient Greece and Rome. Students will analyze developments in Africa, Asia, and Europe during the Middle Ages, including the Crusades. Students will understand how the Renaissance and Reformation provided a springboard for the Age of Reason and the Scientific Revolution. An inquiry into events such as the American War of Independence and French Revolution will prepare students to consider the great advances and social upheaval sparked by the Industrial Revolution. Students will probe the causes, events, and consequences of the two world wars and the rise and fall of Communism. The course concludes with a look at developments shaping current events.1 (2 semesters)
U.S. History HistoryU.S. History Since 1877 details the American story from Reconstruction to the present day. Beginning with western expansion, students will analyze the impact of events including the rise of cities and capitalism, the Alaska Purchase, and the Spanish-American War. Students will understand how technological advances including the assembly line and harnessing electricity, as well as the Progressive agenda of societal reform, influenced American prosperity. Students will consider America’s rise to a world power during World War I before probing events leading up to World War II, including the Great Depression. Students will examine the momentous war and its consequences, including the Cold War and Korean War and investigate latter 20th century events, including the Reagan era and the Persian Gulf War. The course concludes with a look at recent events, including the War on Terrorism.1 (2 semesters)
U.S. GovernmentHistoryU.S. Government commences its examination of American democracy with a general overview of the purpose, types, origin, and formation of governments. Students will explore how colonial self-rule, English law, and weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation influenced the formation of the U.S. Constitution. Students will investigate the principles of the Constitution and the federal system. The purpose, powers, and relationships among the American institutions of self-government—Congress, Presidency, and the Judiciary—will be examined as well as federal, state, and local governments. Students will become aware of their civic responsibility to vote and participate in the governmental process as they gain understanding of the functions and organization of political parties, the evolution of the two-party system, and the influence of public opinion and political ideology on government decisions.1 semester

Foreign Language

For credit foreign language courses are NCAA approved using the Middlebury curriculum listed here.

Course Description College Preparatory/ Work Ready Credit Credit Value
HS Spanish I High School Spanish I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Spanish-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world. High School Spanish I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Spanish I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Spanish II High School Spanish II is the second level of high school Spanish designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Spanish. Foreign Language 1.0
HS French I High School French I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to French-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Francophone world. High School French I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School French I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS French II High School French II is the second level of high school French designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate French. Foreign Language 1.0
HS German I High School German I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to German-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the German-speaking world. High School German I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School German I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS German II High School German II is the second level of high school German designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate German. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Chinese I High School Chinese I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Chinese-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Chinese-speaking world. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. High School Chinese I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Chinese I provides the foundation and path for continued learning. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Chinese II High School Chinese II is the second level of high school Chinese designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus and students are expected to learn several characters in each unit; however, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in overall comprehension. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, instruction is almost entirely in Chinese. High School Chinese II is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Chinese. Foreign Language 1.0
HS Latin I Foreign Language 1.0
HS Latin II Foreign Language 1.0

Electives

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
AdvertisingElectiveThe Advertising course teaches the principles and practices of advertising as an integral part of marketing communication. The course begins with a look at professional opportunities available in the advertising field. Students will consider environmental, ethical, and other professional responsibilities. They will learn about the marketing research process and the components of advertising using the PESO model. Students will apply demographics, segmentation, and the four major sales channels to define target markets and make a sales presentation. In the final Module, students will use their knowledge gained about the product cycle to complete a final project simulating a promotional campaign for a new product.0.5
Anatomy and PhysiologyOther ScienceAnatomy and Physiology introduces students to the structures and functions of the amazing human body. Students will learn about different organ systems and how they work together to maintain life. Some of these organ systems include the circulatory, digestive, skin, reproductive, and respiratory systems. Students will examine different diseases that affect these systems and the treatments (both traditional and new) used to fight the diseases. The development and effects of aging on the different organ systems are explored throughout Anatomy and Physiology.1
Aquatic Science Lab ScienceIn Aquatic Science students will test, predict, and learn about water and things pertaining to water. The first unit will guide students to think of water as a system. Learning the chemistry and physics of water, students will complete a course project by applying scientific methods to collect and analyze data on a local body of water. A survey of the physical properties of the ocean, including their formation and composition, will precede an inquiry into how the atmosphere and sun interact with the hydrosphere to create weather. Students will examine the elements and properties of aquatic ecosystems, including aquatic biology and marine and freshwater ecosystems. In the final unit, students will consider the relationship between humans and water, including challenges such as population growth competing for resources with agriculture and industry.1
Art History Fine ArtsWhat is art? Art History will help students develop skills to recognize and appreciate the diversity of art. The course begins with prehistoric and ancient art before introducing students to the classical art of the Greeks and Romans. Students will survey medieval art before exploring the glory days of art and architecture, the Renaissance. The use of light and shadow to evoke emotion during the Baroque period will impress students as will the whimsical style of the Rococo period. Students will contrast the Neoclassical return to idealized subjects with the Romantic era’s imagination. Appreciation of art will grow as students study Impressionist and Post-Impressionist artists such as Monet and Van Gogh. The course concludes with students tracing modern art movements, including expressionism, minimalism, as well as conceptual art and artists, including Rodin, Picasso, Mondrian, and O’Keeffe.1
Audio Video Production IElectiveAudio/Video Production I explores foundational principles in both audio design and video production. This course is broken down into four primary sections: preproduction, principal photography, postproduction, and career preparation/portfolio development. Each section focuses on the primary elements found in each phase of production. Preproduction explores topics, such as script and storyboard development, production documents, and production planning. Principal photography analyzes key crew roles associated with audio and video production, like the director, sound designer, producer, and actors, as well as shooting techniques, camera gear, and on-set safety. Postproduction delves into topics, such as video editing, copyright laws, and sound mixing and design. The course concludes by having the student create an audio/video portfolio, resumé, and cover letter to prepare for entry into college and the professional world. Requires a PC or MAC computer.1
Business ManagementElectiveBusiness Management is an integral part of the Business, Marketing, and Finance Career and Technical Education clusters. Students will examine evolving views of management with an emphasis on leadership. Next, students will consider ethical case studies and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various organizational structures. In units 4 through 6, students will analyze the decision-making process as it applies to management issues, such as quality control and improving communication. Beginning with unit 7, students will investigate employee compensation and legal matters concerning hiring and firing. The course concludes with a presentation of practical tools to build one’s personal habits and to nurture team building.1
Career PrepElectiveIn Career Prep, students are given tools to be successful in future careers. The career clusters and their associated career paths are the focus of the course. Students will learn how to survey the job market, fill out paperwork, and thrive in the workplace. Students will create an electronic portfolio throughout the course. The portfolio includes letters of interest to employers, resumés and cover letters, interview preparation documents, a career plan, as well as other reports. The course is designed for students who are currently working and can leverage real-life experience into their course projects.1
Child DevelopmentElectiveChild Development prepares students to understand the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of children. The course is designed to help young people acquire knowledge and skills essential to the care and guidance of children as a parent or caregiver. Emphasis is on helping students create an environment for children that will promote optimum development. Students also investigate careers in child development.0.5
Counseling and Mental HealthElectiveThis course is a Career and Technical Education course for use in Health Science or Human Services career pathways. The course covers general topics for personal and professional development (soft skills), such as time management, critical thinking and problem solving, communication, team building, ethics, and character. It also focuses on many mental health topics, including the history of mental health care, modern mental health care systems, the nervous system, mental health across life stages, stress, depression, and serious mental disorders. Students will research topics of professional development of workers in the mental health field, such as scope of practice, how to recognize abuse, and methods for adapting to change. Student and professional organizations for career development will be discussed as well. The course ends with career exploration activities and research of training opportunities.1
EntrepreneurshipElectiveThe Entrepreneurship course is designed to grow the student’s passion for starting, growing, and excelling in business ventures. The student will explore the basics of starting a business, from brainstorming great concepts, to execution and profitability. Entrepreneurship includes more than just starting businesses, but explores the ventures of product development, marketing, distribution, and sales. The student will expand his or her knowledge in the areas of proper product and service pricing, financial planning and growth, accounting and bookkeeping, fundraising, marketing research, and business law. The course asks the student to practice the knowledge and skills he or she has gained by developing and writing a business plan for their very own business venture. The student will gain a complete understanding of what it takes to make a business a success and possibly gain a desire to actually start a company from scratch.1
Environmental SystemsElectiveSemester A and B available. High school elective introduces students to career opportunities and educational pathways in a wide array of environmental fields. Students examine environmental legislation and regulations, government agencies and organizations, monitoring and testing methods and requirements. They discover the relationship between environmental regulations and careers, and study the issues, history, and current status of air and water quality, soil and atmospheric conditions. In an environmentally challenged world, ESS professionals are critically important. Job outlooks and salary scales reflect this need for educated, dedicated researchers, scientists, engineers, etc.1
Literary GenreEnglish Elective Literary Genres is a senior level course in which students will explore and analyze a variety of literature. A grammar review precedes a study of rhetorical and literary devices, as well as a brief survey of the major literary forms. Students will read a variety of fictional selections and stories including The Canterbury Tales, various mythologies, Beowulf, Hansel and Gretel, Dracula, and Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death.” Students will better understand drama after reading excerpts from William Shakespeare’s plays and will contemplate timeless poems by Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Lord Byron, and other poets. Comparing and contrasting speeches by Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan will assist students in analyzing persuasive texts. The course concludes with a look at perspective in nonfiction texts, such as diaries and autobiographies.1
Logic 1ElectiveThe Logic I course will improve the critical thinking skills of students through the study of informal logic. The course will challenge students to evaluate whether humans are rational or emotional beings. The majority of the course explores occurrences of faulty reasoning known as logical fallacies. Students will learn to recognize and expose fallacies when evaluating and critiquing arguments. Fallacies covered include appeal to fear, irrelevant thesis, straw man, false analogy, red herring, and misuse of statistics. Students will apply the study of types, components, and principles of argumentative dialogue in preparing a dialogue of their own. During the course, students will consider and analyze Aesop’s Fables and “The Cave” by Plato. The course concludes with a comprehensive review of fallacies and a preview of formal logic.0.5
Logic 2ElectiveLogic II introduces the student to the world of Aristotelian formal logic. Students will use classical tools, including the Porphyrian tree and Euler’s circles to translate arguments into propositions organized within the categorical form. Students will also learn to analyze the validity of arguments using the square of opposition, terminological rules, Venn diagrams, and the Barbara, Celarent, Darii, Ferio mnemonic. The course concludes with an evaluation of presuppositional disputes and a survey of hypothetical syllogisms.0.5
Medical MicrobiologyLab ScienceMedical Microbiology explores the world of tiny (micro) organisms that are responsible for making people sick. Students learn about the common bacteria, viruses, and protists that cause sickness and disease in humans. Medical Microbiology delves into different ways these germs and diseases can spread from person to person, throughout a community, and eventually around the globe while discussing the best practices for stopping them from spreading. Students look into different medications and how they work to kill or slow the growth of different microorganisms. Students will also research why some antibiotic medications are no longer effective against the bacteria that cause disease. Medical microbiology also teaches laboratory skills in how to effectively grow and isolate different colonies of microorganisms in petri dishes.1
Medical TerminologyElectiveMedical Terminology is a course for students with an interest in the medical field. This course will provide students with knowledge of Latin and Greek roots, prefixes, and suffixes in addition to combining forms and eponymous terms related to the many systems of the human body. Students will also be able to learn more about the many professions, specialists, and treatment plans associated with different areas of the body. This course introduces new ways of looking at the body through the lens of medical terms and their origins.1
Music Appreciation Fine ArtsThis course is designed to help the non-musician understand music basics, including such topics as reading a musical score, melody and harmony, rhythm, music history (styles by period), music theory, musical genres, instruments, orchestration, and arrangement. The course even covers the creation of musical scores using popular music arrangement software. Other topics include the science of musical sound, health and wellness for performers, classical symphony concerts, besides opera performances and etiquette when attending. The course strives to help non-musicians gain an understanding of the world of music and to become well-rounded individuals.1
New Testament Bible LiteracyElectiveThe New Testament (NT) course will equip students with a basic literacy of the NT scriptures. To begin, students will explore the history and characteristics of the NT, survey each book, and recognize the centrality of Jesus of Nazareth. An inquiry into the Christian era will inform students of the NT impact on children, slavery, women, marriage, and education. Students will investigate the profound influence of the NT on politics, limited government, and the concept of justice as seen in important American events including the American Revolution and the U.S. Constitution. Students will understand the effect of the NT on literature after reading selections from Great Expectations, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and other literature. The course concludes with an examination of artwork related to NT events including the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.0.5
Old Testament Bible Literacy ElectiveThe Old Testament (OT) course will equip students with a basic literacy of the Hebrew scriptures. The course begins with an examination of the major divisions, authorship, and translations of the OT before surveying each individual book. The second unit examines the impact of the OT on worldview, society and morals, family, human fallibility, modern science, and the value of human life. Students will recognize the impact of Hebrew scriptures on important events and historical documents including the Reformation, the Magna Carta, and the U.S. Constitution. Students will next probe the influence of the OT on language, culture, and literature, including idioms, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Handel’s Messiah, Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost, and spirituals. The course will conclude by introducing students to the influence of OT on artworks including The Creation of Adam by Michelangelo.0.5
Personal Financial LiteracyFinancial LiteracyThe Personal Finance course introduces students to strategies and practices that will empower them to manage their money wisely. Students will first perform a self-analysis to discover their money personality. A study of good consumer habits includes a comparison of renting and buying. Students will learn the steps to building wealth, including building an emergency fund, evaluating and embracing risk when investing, and using credit sparingly and wisely. A survey of consumer rights accompanies the steps recommended to protect one’s personal information. Students will survey types of insurance and evaluate the role of each in limiting personal financial risk. The course concludes with an entire Unit dedicated to evaluating higher education opportunities, costs, and funding.0.5
Principals of Government and Public AdministrationElectivePrinciples of Government and Public Administration (PGPA) introduces students to careers in public policy. PGPA explores government from the perspective of government and private-sector employees as well as elected officials. Students will examine different career avenues and their ethical and professional standards. PGPA introduces students to theories of governmental development alongside the constitutional principles underlying America’s federal and unitary forms of government. Students will learn about the public officials responsibility to protect citizens’ rights to due process. They will discover how interest groups influence public policy and analyze the effect of policymaking both on the culture and society of the nation and on foreign policy. The course concludes with an investigation into the role of government in a free-market economy, including its ability to stimulate invention and innovation.1
Principles of Business, Marketing and FinanceElectiveThe Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance course will expand the student’s knowledge in the many areas of business and free enterprise. The majority of the course takes a comprehensive look at business disciplines such as analyzing goods versus services, economics, financial management, principles of personal finance, marketing, the global economy, and government in business. The student will gain soft skills such as understanding business ethics, leadership, and the management of employees. The student will gain hard skills such as product management, finances, marketing campaigns, and sales. The course then takes a practical look at career opportunities in business and the professional skills needed to excel within the industry. The student will finish the course with a broad grasp on the principles of starting, operating, and managing a successful company.1
Principles of Health ScienceCTEThis CTE course is designed to help prepare students for a career in the health science field. It covers healthcare systems and the roles of team members within these institutions. The course has many opportunities for students to explore the various careers within the healthcare field. It emphasizes the personal and professional skills required to succeed in this arena, including personal character qualities, teamwork, and leadership. Coverage includes the science of healthcare, including measurement, SI system, anatomy and physiology, and safety practices. It covers topics of healthcare at various life stages, from birth to death. Laws and regulations, best practices, and professional ethics are discussed, as well. Because this course has a careers emphasis, other topics covered include career preparation, the role of student and professional organizations, and the state of thehealth-care career field.1
Principles of Human ServicesElectiveThis course enables students to investigate careers in the human services including counseling, mental health, early childhood development, family and community, and personal care services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand careers.0.5
Psychology ElectiveThe Psychology course begins with a look at basic social science skills including ethical decision-making and statistical evaluation. After a brief survey of careers in psychology, the student will explore the physical processes of the brain and body systems that shape sense and perception. The student will then study theories of development, personality, and conditioning. Next, students will explore mental processes behind thinking and memory, language acquisition, motivation, and emotions. Students will investigate the levels of consciousness and disorders leading to abnormal behavior. The course concludes with an examination of the individual and social behavior. Students will learn about stress, attitude formation, conflict resolution, conformity and obedience, altruism, and morality.0.5
Speech CommunicationFine ArtsSpeech Communication seeks to improve the interpersonal and public communication skills of students. Surveying the communication process, students will learn the components and functions of communication, differentiate between oral and nonverbal communication, and comprehend the listening process. Developing familiarity with self and personal strengths and weaknesses, students will boost self-confidence as public speakers in situations such as speeches or interviews. The course will culminate with students applying their acquired communication skills in researching, preparing, and giving a speech.0.5
Virtual BusinessElectiveThe Virtual Business course guides students through the basics of starting, operating, and managing an online company. This course is designed for students interested in starting a virtual business by creating a web presence, conducting online and offline marketing, examining and creating business contracts for online business, and exploring project-management systems. The student will also explore bookkeeping processes, applicable legal company business structures, managing telecommuting employees, maintaining business records, as well as entrepreneurship. Virtual Business also guides the student through potential online career pathways by conducting various personality and career pathway assessments. The student will conclude the course by applying learned skills to create a company, including a business plan, branding the business, and creating a website using common website builder tools.0.5
Web CommunicationsComputer TechnologyIn Web Communications, students learn how to be good digital citizens. Rights, responsibilities, and digital communication tools are explored. Students will learn how to search and choose valid internet sources for research while gaining deeper understanding of new technologies. Students will dive into the history of the Web and how it has changed over time. Topics such as internet safety, security, and cyberbullying are also analyzed. Using the knowledge gained in the course, students will write a web-hosted blog post with HTML coding elements. The course ends with the fundamentals of web design and a project in which students create a simple webpage.0.5