Accelerate

Mobility-enabled curriculum…

Accelerate Education offers mobility-enabled curriculum, systems, and tools to increase educational opportunities and achievement to students and teachers in grades K-12.

Learning Styles: Linguistic – Word Smart, Intrapersonal – Myself Smart, Visual/Spatial – Picture Smart
Compatibility: Computer & iPad
Delivery Format: Web-based
Standards: Oklahoma, CCSS, NWEA

Click any of the links below to view course descriptions.

Elementary

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
KindergartenLanguage ArtsThis Kindergarten Language Arts course will teach students to identify and write all letters, produce letter sounds and also frequently used phonograms.
1st GradeLanguage ArtsThis First Grade Language Arts course will teach students to identify and write all letters, produce letter sounds and also frequently used phonograms.
2nd GradeLanguage ArtsThe 2nd Grade Language Arts course will teach students to spell and write vocabulary, read more fluently, apply grammar concepts, and participate in handwriting and writing activities through thematic units.
3rd GradeLanguage ArtsThis Third Grade Language Arts course will teach students to reading comprehension skill and strategies to help them become stronger readers.
4th GradeLanguage ArtsThe 4th grade Language Arts curriculum integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and the study of vocabulary and grammar in a way that engages today's learners and supports them in building a broad and diverse set of literacy skills. Semester B teaches specific skills for reading poetry, drama, informational text.
5th GradeLanguage ArtsThe 5th grade Language Arts curriculum integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and the study of vocabulary and grammar in a way that engages today's learners and supports them in building a broad and diverse set of literacy skills. Semester B focuses on skills for reading and analyzing informational text.
KindergartenMathThe Kindergarten curriculum teaches students will learn foundational math facts. They will learn to count to 12, how to compare sizes, ordinal numbers putting items in order, what a number line is and its uses, basic measurements such as inches and feet, and how to tell time on digital and analog clocks.Students learn to count to twenty. They work with comparing objects using the terms tall, longer, and shorter as well as comparing two objects using the terms lighter and heavier. They will continue their exploration of basic geometric shapes such as cones and spheres. The will work with the concept of first, middle, and last.
1st GradeMathStudents will build fluency with basic math facts. They will learn to count to 100, basic addition and subtraction facts, and how to add double-digit numbers. Students will be introduced to such new concepts as word problems, Venn diagrams, and basic geometric concepts. Students will begin counting by twos, fives, and tens. They will learn both vertical addition and subtraction. Students are introduced to multiplication and division and the signs used in those operations. They will also study even and odd numbers.Students continue their exploration of geometric shapes through drawing and apply what they learn about shapes by sorting various figures in Venn diagrams. They will also use a balance beam to understand the concept of weight – lighter versus heavier.
2nd GradeMathStudents will build fluency with basic math facts and add and subtract within 100 to solve word problems using strategic methods. Students will also manipulate numbers to 1000 using knowledge of hundreds, tens, and ones. Lastly, students with demonstrate arrays with repeated addition. Students will use place value to add and subtract within 1000. They will use place value to estimate and solve word problems to demonstrate skills. Students will measure and compare length and represent it on a number line. They will work with money and time to compare value. Students will collect data and represented on graphs to discuss it. Lastly, they will recognize common 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional shapes by specific characteristics.
3rd GradeMathThere is an emphasis on learning practical skills such as reading thermometers, looking at maps, and understanding the value of coins.
4th GradeMathGrade 4 math uses a varied amount of instructional material to reinforce and teach new math skills to the 4th grade learners. Instruction includes creative videos, mathematical storytelling, practical math applications and repetition to reinforce skills throughout the course. Three areas are focused on and students will finish the course with a strong knowledge in these content areas. They will learn to multiply fractions and convert them to decimals. Students will also begin to learn to equivalent measurements of length, weight, mass, and capacity. They will also learn helpful skills in understanding time, distance, and money. Students will develop an understanding that geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties, such as having parallel sides, perpendicular sides, particular angle measures, and symmetry.
5th GradeMathStudents will have multiple opportunities to practice new skills and knowledge through using integrated online practice problems.
KindergartenScienceIn Kindergarten Science, students in this course will use their senses to explore their world. Students experience nature walks, gardening, and imitative games by exploring varying concepts.
1st GradeScienceIn First Grade Science, students in this course will complete projects that are designed to allow for exploration and discovery. Students observe their surroundings and through observations of the natural world conduct inquiries into topics related to their healthy development. The following topics are covered: Students in this course will complete projects that are designed to allow for exploration and discovery. Students observe their surroundings and through observations of the natural world conduct inquiries into topics related to their healthy development. The following topics are covered:
2nd GradeScienceSecond Grade Science introduces students to the process of observation and how important it is to the study of science. Learners will identify their five senses and why they are critical to observation. Students will use these observation skills throughout the course as they examine many different types of animals and their environments. Students begin by observing ants in their own environments and continue onto learning the different types of birds. Students will come to understand plant and animal rhythms and will perform small experiments with plants. Stories will be used to teach the students about nature and interactions that humans have with nature. They will continue to learn about animals and their characteristics habitats, and needs. Students will learn through video, audio stories, hands-on participation and observation with nature.
3rd GradeScienceThird grade science introduces students to experimentation as they journey through the earth and its many miracles. They will begin by learning about the earth, the sun and the moon. By participating in simple experiments students will explore the water cycle, gravity, the weather and it’s patterns, various types of terrain, and the role of plants in the production of oxygen and their importance to human survival. Learners will expand their knowledge through video, pictures, short readings, projects, and hands on experiments. Learners will understand that experiments require the use of instruments, observation, recording, and drawing evidence based conclusions.
4th GradeScienceGrade 4 Science includes the three main domains of science which are physical, life, and earth and space science. Learners will use various kinds of experimenting, including field studies, systematic observations, models, and controlled experiences. The course begins with the explanation of the scientific method which the students continue to use and build upon throughout the course. The big picture of the earth is examined as students review the life on planet earth, salt and fresh water, and fast and slow changes that occur on the planet. Students go beyond planet earth, though, as they study galaxies, the solar system and other planets. Students examine the ways that forces and motion can be measured and the concept that a single kind of matter can exist as a solid, liquid or gas.
5th GradeScienceGrade 5 Science continues to build on the science skills that have been obtained in years previous. There will be an emphasis on earth and space science, life science, and physical science. Students will begin the course by focusing on earth and space science by looking at the solar system and planets. Students will come to an understanding of the concept of the earth as a sphere and the earth’s place in the solar system. The course continues with a focus on physical science and the different tools that can measure force, time, and distance. They will also grow in their understanding of how light and sound travel and interact with each other as well as the different types of energy.
KindergartenSocial StudiesThis course introduces students to their place in the community and the responsibilities of being a member of society. Great figures of U.S. history such as Pocahontas, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are a focus of learning in the first semester. Students will also learn about everyday heroes, the responsibilities of pet ownership, the importance of rules, table manners, and eating well. A skill that students will practice throughout the semester is retelling stories. Students may do this by recording audio, retelling the stories orally, or writing their observations. They will learn how to use details and basics of narratives. Projects will help students think about what pets need and defining emotions.
1st GradeSocial StudiesStudents begin to explore basic fundamentals of social studies including map skills, cardinal directions, and will begin to examine maps of the U.S. and the globe. Students will also be introduced to important figures from American history such as Pocahontas, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Clara Barton. A skill that students will practice throughout the semester is retelling stories. Students may do this by recording audio, retelling the stories orally, or writing their observations. They will learn how to use details and basics of narratives. Students will also make maps of their homes, neighborhoods, as well as a personal timeline.
2nd GradeSocial StudiesIn second grade, students in this course will begin to explore the basic fundamentals of social studies including culture, geography, and economics. The second semester begins by introducing learners to economics and the role that money plays in every civilization.
3rd GradeSocial StudiesIn third grade, social studies students will begin to explore the basic fundamentals of social studies including geography, civics, and economics. The second semester begins with introducing learners to economics and the role that money plays in every civilization.
4th GradeSocial StudiesIn grade 4 Social Studies learners will use their understanding of social studies skills to explore their local states and communities. Semester B of grade 4 Social Studies picks up where semester A left off by looking further into frontier life of the early American settlers.
5th GradeSocial StudiesGrade 5 Social Studies combines the study of United States History through the Civil War with a geographical exploration of the Unites States and what it has to offer. Semester B begins with an exploration of the west and what life was like for those looking to find gold.

Middle School

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
KindergartenLanguage ArtsThis Kindergarten Language Arts course will teach students to identify and write all letters, produce letter sounds and also frequently used phonograms.
1st GradeLanguage ArtsThis First Grade Language Arts course will teach students to identify and write all letters, produce letter sounds and also frequently used phonograms.
2nd GradeLanguage ArtsThe 2nd Grade Language Arts course will teach students to spell and write vocabulary, read more fluently, apply grammar concepts, and participate in handwriting and writing activities through thematic units.
3rd GradeLanguage ArtsThis Third Grade Language Arts course will teach students to reading comprehension skill and strategies to help them become stronger readers.
4th GradeLanguage ArtsThe 4th grade Language Arts curriculum integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and the study of vocabulary and grammar in a way that engages today's learners and supports them in building a broad and diverse set of literacy skills. Semester B teaches specific skills for reading poetry, drama, informational text.
5th GradeLanguage ArtsThe 5th grade Language Arts curriculum integrates reading, writing, speaking, listening, and the study of vocabulary and grammar in a way that engages today's learners and supports them in building a broad and diverse set of literacy skills. Semester B focuses on skills for reading and analyzing informational text.
KindergartenMathThe Kindergarten curriculum teaches students will learn foundational math facts. They will learn to count to 12, how to compare sizes, ordinal numbers putting items in order, what a number line is and its uses, basic measurements such as inches and feet, and how to tell time on digital and analog clocks.Students learn to count to twenty. They work with comparing objects using the terms tall, longer, and shorter as well as comparing two objects using the terms lighter and heavier. They will continue their exploration of basic geometric shapes such as cones and spheres. The will work with the concept of first, middle, and last.
1st GradeMathStudents will build fluency with basic math facts. They will learn to count to 100, basic addition and subtraction facts, and how to add double-digit numbers. Students will be introduced to such new concepts as word problems, Venn diagrams, and basic geometric concepts. Students will begin counting by twos, fives, and tens. They will learn both vertical addition and subtraction. Students are introduced to multiplication and division and the signs used in those operations. They will also study even and odd numbers.Students continue their exploration of geometric shapes through drawing and apply what they learn about shapes by sorting various figures in Venn diagrams. They will also use a balance beam to understand the concept of weight – lighter versus heavier.
2nd GradeMathStudents will build fluency with basic math facts and add and subtract within 100 to solve word problems using strategic methods. Students will also manipulate numbers to 1000 using knowledge of hundreds, tens, and ones. Lastly, students with demonstrate arrays with repeated addition. Students will use place value to add and subtract within 1000. They will use place value to estimate and solve word problems to demonstrate skills. Students will measure and compare length and represent it on a number line. They will work with money and time to compare value. Students will collect data and represented on graphs to discuss it. Lastly, they will recognize common 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional shapes by specific characteristics.
3rd GradeMathThere is an emphasis on learning practical skills such as reading thermometers, looking at maps, and understanding the value of coins.
4th GradeMathGrade 4 math uses a varied amount of instructional material to reinforce and teach new math skills to the 4th grade learners. Instruction includes creative videos, mathematical storytelling, practical math applications and repetition to reinforce skills throughout the course. Three areas are focused on and students will finish the course with a strong knowledge in these content areas. They will learn to multiply fractions and convert them to decimals. Students will also begin to learn to equivalent measurements of length, weight, mass, and capacity. They will also learn helpful skills in understanding time, distance, and money. Students will develop an understanding that geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties, such as having parallel sides, perpendicular sides, particular angle measures, and symmetry.
5th GradeMathStudents will have multiple opportunities to practice new skills and knowledge through using integrated online practice problems.
KindergartenScienceIn Kindergarten Science, students in this course will use their senses to explore their world. Students experience nature walks, gardening, and imitative games by exploring varying concepts.
1st GradeScienceIn First Grade Science, students in this course will complete projects that are designed to allow for exploration and discovery. Students observe their surroundings and through observations of the natural world conduct inquiries into topics related to their healthy development. The following topics are covered: Students in this course will complete projects that are designed to allow for exploration and discovery. Students observe their surroundings and through observations of the natural world conduct inquiries into topics related to their healthy development. The following topics are covered:
2nd GradeScienceSecond Grade Science introduces students to the process of observation and how important it is to the study of science. Learners will identify their five senses and why they are critical to observation. Students will use these observation skills throughout the course as they examine many different types of animals and their environments. Students begin by observing ants in their own environments and continue onto learning the different types of birds. Students will come to understand plant and animal rhythms and will perform small experiments with plants. Stories will be used to teach the students about nature and interactions that humans have with nature. They will continue to learn about animals and their characteristics habitats, and needs. Students will learn through video, audio stories, hands-on participation and observation with nature.
3rd GradeScienceThird grade science introduces students to experimentation as they journey through the earth and its many miracles. They will begin by learning about the earth, the sun and the moon. By participating in simple experiments students will explore the water cycle, gravity, the weather and it’s patterns, various types of terrain, and the role of plants in the production of oxygen and their importance to human survival. Learners will expand their knowledge through video, pictures, short readings, projects, and hands on experiments. Learners will understand that experiments require the use of instruments, observation, recording, and drawing evidence based conclusions.
4th GradeScienceGrade 4 Science includes the three main domains of science which are physical, life, and earth and space science. Learners will use various kinds of experimenting, including field studies, systematic observations, models, and controlled experiences. The course begins with the explanation of the scientific method which the students continue to use and build upon throughout the course. The big picture of the earth is examined as students review the life on planet earth, salt and fresh water, and fast and slow changes that occur on the planet. Students go beyond planet earth, though, as they study galaxies, the solar system and other planets. Students examine the ways that forces and motion can be measured and the concept that a single kind of matter can exist as a solid, liquid or gas.
5th GradeScienceGrade 5 Science continues to build on the science skills that have been obtained in years previous. There will be an emphasis on earth and space science, life science, and physical science. Students will begin the course by focusing on earth and space science by looking at the solar system and planets. Students will come to an understanding of the concept of the earth as a sphere and the earth’s place in the solar system. The course continues with a focus on physical science and the different tools that can measure force, time, and distance. They will also grow in their understanding of how light and sound travel and interact with each other as well as the different types of energy.
KindergartenSocial StudiesThis course introduces students to their place in the community and the responsibilities of being a member of society. Great figures of U.S. history such as Pocahontas, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are a focus of learning in the first semester. Students will also learn about everyday heroes, the responsibilities of pet ownership, the importance of rules, table manners, and eating well. A skill that students will practice throughout the semester is retelling stories. Students may do this by recording audio, retelling the stories orally, or writing their observations. They will learn how to use details and basics of narratives. Projects will help students think about what pets need and defining emotions.
1st GradeSocial StudiesStudents begin to explore basic fundamentals of social studies including map skills, cardinal directions, and will begin to examine maps of the U.S. and the globe. Students will also be introduced to important figures from American history such as Pocahontas, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Clara Barton. A skill that students will practice throughout the semester is retelling stories. Students may do this by recording audio, retelling the stories orally, or writing their observations. They will learn how to use details and basics of narratives. Students will also make maps of their homes, neighborhoods, as well as a personal timeline.
2nd GradeSocial StudiesIn second grade, students in this course will begin to explore the basic fundamentals of social studies including culture, geography, and economics. The second semester begins by introducing learners to economics and the role that money plays in every civilization.
3rd GradeSocial StudiesIn third grade, social studies students will begin to explore the basic fundamentals of social studies including geography, civics, and economics. The second semester begins with introducing learners to economics and the role that money plays in every civilization.
4th GradeSocial StudiesIn grade 4 Social Studies learners will use their understanding of social studies skills to explore their local states and communities. Semester B of grade 4 Social Studies picks up where semester A left off by looking further into frontier life of the early American settlers.
5th GradeSocial StudiesGrade 5 Social Studies combines the study of United States History through the Civil War with a geographical exploration of the Unites States and what it has to offer. Semester B begins with an exploration of the west and what life was like for those looking to find gold.

High School

Language Arts

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
English IEnglish/Language ArtsJoin us in English I for a series of journeys. In each unit of the course, we embark on a new journey.
Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, we will explore the unknown, search for identity and
equality, and seek achievement, opportunity, and understanding. You will read to analyze the way
language is used to express human motivation and will research to examine the results of actions in the
real world. The lessons in each unit will give you the tools you need to gain insights from what you read
and to use your knowledge in creative and analytical writing.
1
English I for Credit RecoveryEnglish/Language ArtsThis full credit course is provided for students who have previously taken English I, and were not
successful. Students may take one or both segments of this course. Students will develop language arts
skills by reading, writing, listening, viewing, and speaking. Students will learn to use the English language
to successfully express themselves.
Pre-Requisites: Students must have already taken English I, but not earned credit.
0.5
English IIEnglish/Language ArtsIn English II, students learn how the human experience – real life – is the foundation of the best stories,
plays, poems, films, and articles. The four modules – Live Love Laugh, Obstacles, Fear, and Betrayal –
allow students to focus on particular aspects of the human experience. Throughout the course, students
explore what it means to be human, what it means to be fulfilled, challenged, transformed, and
intellectually active. Designed to meet Common Core Standards, the course takes an in-depth look at
pieces of literature through close readings, the use of textual evidence in writings, the creation of
arguments through research and facts, and the application of writing and revision strategies.
1
English II for Credit RecoveryEnglish/Language ArtsThe purpose of this course is to provide grade 10 students who have not passed English II an
opportunity to recover the course credit. This course uses texts of high complexity, integrated language
arts study in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language for college and career preparation and
readiness.
Pre-Requisites: This full credit course is provided for students who have previously taken English II but
have not successfully passed. Students may take one or both segments to recover the credit.
0.5
English IIIEnglish/Language Arts“Extra, extra, read all about it!” It’s all right here in black and white, in the pages of The Virtual Times
newspaper. Published at key periods in American history, The Virtual Times takes us right into the
action. The writing is clear and concise. The stories and opinions give us perspective. The sports and
entertainment sections give us the color and flavor of the times. In English III, the writing and insights of
authors throughout our history are collected in the fast-paced pages of The Virtual Times. Students gain
an appreciation of American literature and the ways it reflects the times in which it was written. They
discover how people thought and lived and wrote about their experiences. Students are also asked to
observe, investigate, and report on stories of today. The goal is for students to be thorough, accurate,
and compelling in their writing.
Pre-Requisites: Recommended: English I & II
1
English III for Credit RecoveryEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish 3 for Credit Recovery is a high school course that covers active reading and analysis of literary
and informational texts of high complexity; writing for varied purposes; listening, speaking, and viewing

skills; and collaboration for college and career preparation and readiness. Students are exposed to high-
complexity texts on a deeper level, spending more time with that text and writing to that text.

Pre-Requisites: Students must combine a previous attempt of English 3 with a passing score in this
course to receive credit for high school graduation.
0.5
English IVEnglish/Language ArtsCome explore the world of big ideas in English IV, where you are able to choose which path you will
travel first as you explore highly-engaging, thematic units. Each path will guide you through a series of
literary pieces that allow you to analyze the political, social, economic, and cultural messages of its time
as well as its relevance to the world you live in today. Each path revolves around a central theme. The
works in the course span a period of over 1000 years and have been written by authors who share
common ideas, but employ a variety of literary genres to express their views. Whether it is the dramatic
ending of a play, or the colorful images in a verse of poetry, the words of these authors will leave you
with a new understanding of the world around you. As you travel down each path, you will create
authentic work pieces that will engage you in higher-level learning and provide you with a greater
understanding of literature and its connection to the world.
1
English IV for Credit RecoveryEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish 4 Credit Recovery covers reading literature, reading informational text, applying language skills,
writing (informational, narrative, and argument), researching and presenting strategies, and speaking
and listening skills. Students will be exposed to literature on a deeper level, spending more time with
one text and writing to that text.
Pre-Requisites: Students must have already taken English IV, but not earned credit.
0.5
Honors Language Arts 9 A&BEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish Honors for grade 9 is an integrated curriculum with challenging assignments aimed at preparing Honors-level students for advanced work in the study of literature and language arts. Each unit contains thematically related lessons in five domains: reading and the study of literature, reading informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language study, which includes word knowledge and grammar skills. Topics are presented in ways that help young adolescents relate literacy skills to other aspects of their lives. Writing assignments include narrative, expository, and persuasive/argumentative modes and emphasize the use of and details and reasoning to support ideas. Speaking and listening lessons in Semester A emphasize collaborative discussion skills and peer review. 1
Honors Language Arts 10 A&BEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish 10 Honors is an integrated curriculum consisting of thematically related lessons in five domains: analyzing literature, analyzing informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language study, which includes word knowledge and grammar skills. The course provides challenging assignments aimed at preparing Honors-level students for advanced work in the study of literature and language arts. An introductory lesson at the start of each unit helps students identify any areas of weakness and review those topics if needed. Writing assignments required in Semester A of this course include fiction, expository, and persuasive, and analytical modeses, emphasizing the use of details, evidence, and reasoning to support ideas. 1
Honors Language Arts 11 A&BEnglish/Language ArtsHonors English 11 is an American Literature course, with units organized chronologically according to periods in literary history. As students read foundational works of literature and other historical documents written between 1600 and 1900, they’ll review and extend skills in five domains: analyzing literature, analyzing informational text, writing, speaking and listening, and language study, which includes word knowledge and grammar skills. Each module or unit begins with a lesson that provides historical context for the era and introduces themes that emerged in the literature of that era. Each lesson provides students with an opportunity to review basic analyis skills before applying those skills to works of literature or key historical documents. Lessons focused on more difficult historical documents include activities that help students comprehend the complex ideas in these works. The Honors level of the course provides additional challenging assignments aimed at preparing college-bound students for advanced work in the study of literature and language arts.1
Honors Language Arts 12 A&BEnglish/Language ArtsEnglish 12A Honors focuses on learning to write with confidence and mastery. Emphasis is placed on building language flexibility, improving sentence structure, and mastering the writing process. Students create, revise, and edit six writing projects that are designed to help them take their writing to the next level. As an Honors course, emphasis is placed on project-based instruction and increased reading and writing opportunities. In this thought-provoking writing course, students prepare themselves for the demands of college and/or the job market by developing their writing skills. Through text readings, videos, interactive PowerPoint presentations, practice activities, workbook questions, interactive skills challenges, discussions, writing projects, and other activities students demonstrate their mastery of the writing process. Students will integrate the 6-Traits of Writing (i.e., ideas and content, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions) to all of their writing. As an Honors course, emphasis will be placed on additional reading and writing project-based instruction. Students will create projects including a short story, expository essay, functional document, persuasive essay, literary analysis, and research paper. Through the engaging activities in English 12A Honors, students become more mature and accomplished writers.1
Creative WritingEnglish/Language ArtsThis creative writing class is about you – and all the characters, voices, and stories in your head. In this introductory class, you will explore poetry, drama, and short stories as a way to express, explore, and connect with yourself and the world around you. Writing will be examined as a process that reflects thinking. You will begin with brainstorming and pre-writing skills and move forward to various writing genres culminating in a short story at the end of the course. Poetry, plays, and short stories will be studied both as a reader and as a writer. Time will be spent developing characters and using dialogue productively.0.5
Contemporary NovelsEnglish/Language ArtsFor this course, students will read a set of novels and novellas that were written during the twentieth century and reflect themes common to contemporary literature, such as the ability of the human spirit to rise above seemingly-impossible circumstances. Through creative projects and writing assignments, students will identify and analyze each novel’s themes and also compare and contrast the novels’ treatment of common themes. Please note that, like most contemporary literature, the novels assigned for this course contain realistic situations and language. In addition to the novels listed, each student will read another contemporary novel of his or her choosing that the instructor must approve. MLA (Modern Language Association) documentation is required on all papers submitted.0.5

Math

Course Name
Course Type
Course Description
Course Credit
Algebra I AMathAlgebra and the world around you. You may not know it, but algebra is behind the scenes of just about
everything. How long will it take to get to school? What does it mean to be average in height? What
percentage of your time do you spend studying or watching TV? There are ways to measure and
calculate everything from the amount of water in a glass, to the amount of glass needed to build a
skyscraper. This course will review some of the fundamental math skills you learned in middle school,
and then get you up to speed on the basic concepts of algebra. Each module takes you step-by-step into
the world of integers, equations, graphs and data analysis. You'll work at your own pace until the
numbers come out right. This course connects algebra to the real world. It also demystifies algebra,
making it easier to understand and master. The goal is to create a foundation in math that will stay with
you throughout high school.

Pre-Requisites: Student should be in 9th grade or higher. Course is part of a two-year sequence with
Algebra IB.
0.5
Algebra I BMathIt’s time to finish what you started. In Algebra IA, you learned that algebra is an efficient way to solve
some real-world problems. You also acquired the power to do a lot of the important basic work. Now,
after a quick review, you’ll be ready to tackle Algebra IB. This course works like the last one. You’ll get
step-by-step instructions with all the numbers, equations, and graphs on the screen right in front of you.
You’ll also have plenty of time to practice and plenty of opportunities to ask your teacher for help. Along
with learning new algebraic strategies and properties, you’ll learn data analysis concepts and
techniques. You’ll also see how algebra connects with other high school subjects like geometry, statistics
and biology. Together, Algebra IA and IB will meet your Algebra I requirement. These courses will also
give you a powerful tool for understanding how the world works, and how to make it work for you.
0.5
Algebra I for Credit RecoveryMathAlgebra I is the foundation—the skills acquired in this course contain the basic knowledge needed for all
future high school math courses. The material covered in this course is important, but everyone can do
it. Anyone can have a good time solving the hundreds of real-world problems algebra can help answer.
Each module in this course is presented in a step-by-step way right on the computer screen. Hands-on
labs make the numbers, graphs, and equations more real. The content in this course is tied to real-world
applications like sports, travel, business, and health. This course is designed to give students the skills
and strategies to solve all kinds of mathematical problems. Students will also acquire the confidence
needed to handle everything high school math has in store for them.
Pre-Requisites: Student has previously completed Algebra I without achieving a passing grade.
0.5
Algebra IIMathThis course allows students to learn while having fun. Interactive examples help guide students’ journey
through customized feedback and praise. Mathematical concepts are applied to everyday occurrences
such as earthquakes, stadium seating, and purchasing movie tickets. Students investigate the effects of
an equation on its graph through the use of technology. Students have opportunities to work with their
peers on specific lessons. Algebra II is an advanced course using hands-on activities, applications, group
interactions, and the latest technology.
1
Algebra II for Credit RecoveryMathThis course allows students to learn while having fun. Interactive examples help guide students’
journeys through customized feedback and praise. Mathematical concepts are applied to everyday
occurrences such as earthquakes, stadium seating, and purchasing movie tickets. Students investigate
the effects of an equation on its graph through the use of technology. Students have opportunities to
work with their peers on specific lessons
Pre-Requisites: Student has previously completed Algebra II without achieving a passing grade.
0.5
GeometryMathGeometry is everywhere, not just in pyramids. Engineers use geometry to build highways and bridges.
Artists use geometry to create perspective in their paintings, and mapmakers help travelers find things
using the points located on a geometric grid. Throughout this course, students travel a mathematical
highway illuminated by spatial relationships, reasoning, connections, and problem solving.
1
Geometry for Credit RecoveryMath"Geometry is everywhere, not just in pyramids. Engineers use geometry to build highways and bridges.
Artists use geometry to create perspective in their paintings, and mapmakers help travelers find things
using the points located on a geometric grid. Throughout this course, students travel a mathematical
highway illuminated by spatial relationships, reasoning, connections, and problem solving."
0.5
Integrated Math 1 A&BMathIntegrated Mathematics I is the foundation—the skills acquired in this course contain the basic
knowledge needed for all future high school math courses. The material covered in this course is
important, and everyone can do it. Everyone can have a good time solving the hundreds of real-world
problems algebra can help answer. Course activities make the numbers, graphs, and equations more
real. The content in this course is tied to real-world applications like sports, travel, business, and health.
This course is designed to give students the skills and strategies to solve all kinds of mathematical
problems. Students will also acquire the confidence needed to handle everything high school math has
in store for them. Integrated Mathematics I emphasizes the importance of algebra and geometry in
everyday life through hundreds of real-world examples. Assessments are designed to ensure that your
understanding goes beyond rote memorization of steps and procedures. Upon successful course

completion, students will have a strong foundation in Integrated Mathematics I and will be prepared for
other higher level math courses.
1
Integrated Math 2 A&BMathOne day in 2580 B.C.E., a very serious architect stood in a dusty desert with a set of plans. His plans
called for creating a structure 480 feet tall, with a square base and triangular sides, using stone blocks
weighing two tons each. The Pharaoh wanted the job done right. The better this architect understood
geometry, the better his chances were for staying alive. Algebra and geometry are everywhere, not just
in pyramids. Engineers use them to build highways and bridges. Artists use them to create perspective in
their paintings, and mapmakers help travelers find things using the points located on grids. Throughout
this course, students travel a mathematical highway illuminated by spatial relationships, reasoning,
connections, and problem solving.
0.5
Integrated Math 3 A&BMathThis course allows students to learn while having fun. Interactive examples help guide students’ journey
through customized feedback and praise. Mathematical concepts are applied to everyday occurrences
such as earthquakes, stadium seating, and purchasing movie tickets. Students investigate the effects of
an equation on its graph through the use of technology. Students have opportunities to work with their
peers on specific lessons.
Pre-Requisites: Integrated Mathematics I & II
1
Consumer Math A&BMathThis course focuses on the mathematics involved in making wise consumer decisions. Students explore the many ways in which mathematics affects their daily lives. The first semester will cover paychecks and wages, taxes, insurance, budgets, bank accounts, credit cards, interest calculations, and comparison shopping. Second semester topics include vehicle and home purchasing, investing, and business and employee management.1
Honors Algebra 1 A&BMathHonors Algebra 1 (semester A) introduces students to the world of Algebra through expressions and equations. Students will evaluate algebraic expressions, solve linear equations and graph them. This course also steers students through various real-world scenarios with the emphasis on using basic statistics to interpret the information given and found. Honors Algebra 1 (semester B) builds on the concepts learned in the first semester by providing a strong foundation in solving problems. Students will work with problems and applications that involve exponents, quadratic equations, polynomials and factoring methods, rational and radical equations, data analysis and probability.1
Honors Algebra 2 A&BMathThis course further extends the learner’s understanding of major algebra concepts, and prepares them with the building blocks needed to dive deeper into trigonometry, pre-calculus and advanced probability and statistics. Topics include radicals, quadratic functions and equations, polynomials, rationals, systems of equations and inequalities, exponents and logarithms, sequences and series, probability and statistics and trigonometry. In the honors course, students will do in depth study, problem-solving and application of algebraic concepts.1
Honors Geometry A&BMathGeometry Honors is the study of the measurement of the world, with a focus on application of geometric concepts. What makes Geometry so engaging is the relationship of figures and measures to each other, and how these relationships can predict results in the world around us. Through real-world applications, the honors student sees how geometric reasoning provides insight into everyday life. This course builds on the foundation of the first terms in Geometry. As in previous courses, deductive and inductive reasoning are emphasized, while applying problem-solving techniques to real-world problems. Students explore quadrilaterals and circles, and learn how an object is transformed, as well as how to represent that transformation algebraically and geometrically.1
Pre-Algebra A&BMathPre-Algebra A will help students move from the world of simple mathematics to the exciting world of Algebra and Geometry. They will develop skills that will be necessary throughout their life. Students will stretch their thinking by learning to solve real world problems.Learning math and algebra concepts can be fun. Pre-Algebra B will continue to move students into the exciting world of the unknown, Algebra. Building on what they have learned in mathematics and Pre-Algebra, students will expand their skills. They will be introduced to increasingly abstract concepts. Pre-Algebra B will provide the student with a concrete understanding of the basics for algebraic thinking. 1
Pre-Calculus A&BMathIn this course, students will understand and apply concepts, graphs and applications of a variety of families of functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, logistic and trigonometric. An emphasis will be placed on use of appropriate functions to model real world situations and solve problems that arise from those situations. A focus is also on graphing functions by hand and understanding and identifying the parts of a graph.1

Science

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credits
Anatomy and PhysiologyScienceIn this course students explore the organization of the human body and how it works. They will acquire
knowledge necessary to understand what the body is doing and how they can help the body cope with
many different situations. Body systems will be studied in order to understand how their structure,
location, and function allow for interaction with other parts of the body.
Pre-Requisites: Biology 1 recommended, but not required
1
Biology IScienceThis course guides students through the study of living and non-living systems and how they interact
with one another. Students explore the world they live in by posing questions and seeking answers
through scientific inquiry. Discovery takes place through observation and data collection. The students
will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity, and evolution of living matter. This is a course
with real relevance. It encourages curiosity and provides opportunity for students to work on hands on
lab activities and develop relationships through collaboratively learning. Engaging in the study of
biological science broadens the picture of the world around us.
1
Biology I for Credit RecoveryScienceThis Biology course is designed to give students a fundamental look at the characteristics of living
organisms and their environment. Students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity and

evolution of living matter. The course provides scientific inquiry and discovery by incorporating hands on
labs and a variety of web-based activities that engage the student in their study of the biological life that
surrounds us all.
Pre-Requisites: Previous attempt at Biology I without successful completion.
1
ChemistryScienceChemistry I and Chemistry I Honors are rigorous and not intended for credit recovery. This course
contains several laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research,
measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and
safety procedures that are an integral part of the learning experience. This course is designed as an
interactive, 21st century course. Topics include the composition, properties, and changes associated
with matter and their applications. This course serves as a foundation for the study of Chemistry. The
utilization of scientific inquiry, interactive experiences, higher order thinking, collaborative projects, real
world application all aid the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance
of Chemistry in the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives.
Pre-Requisites: Algebra I
1
Chemistry for Credit RecoveryScienceThis course is designed for credit recovery for Chemistry I. Chemistry is the study of the composition and
structure of materials and the changes they undergo. This 1.0 credit course is broken into two 0.5 credit
segments which may be taken separately to meet the needs of the student. The Chemistry I for Credit
Recovery course provides an opportunity for students to strengthen their skills through a series of seven
modules, each of which offers vocabulary support, interactive practice, and virtual laboratory
experiences.
Pre-Requisites: Student has previously completed chemistry without achieving a passing grade
1
Earth Space ScienceScienceBe captivated by the wonders and beauty of the third planet from our Sun, Earth. Be amazed by what
awaits your discovery within our solar system and beyond. Explore the universe. Earth/Space Science is
a laboratory course focusing on the study of space, geologic structures and forces, the waters on our
planet, and atmospheric conditions. Through experimentation and investigation, students explore the
earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, crysosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. This
course offers interactive experiences, higher-order thinking, collaborative projects, and real-world
application along with a variety of assessments. Upon completion of the course, students have a clear

understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the world around them, becoming better caretakers of
our planet, Earth.
1
Marine ScienceScienceSince the beginning of time, humans have relied on the ocean. But as our planet continues to change
over time, human activity has impacted the environment. In the marine science course, students
explore the watery depths of our own planet in order to understand just how vital the ocean is to our
existence. Throughout the course, students meet marine animals and learn about their interactions with
each other and their environment. Students tour the evolving seafloor, where they encounter trenches,
volcanoes, and ridges. Along the way, students hang ten as they discover waves, currents, tides, and
other physical interactions between the ocean and the land. Finally, students study the impacts of
chemical processes on our blue planet and how they affect the water, the atmosphere, and our climate.
With a focus on conservation, this course shows students that the ocean connects us all, across distance
and even time. Hang on—it’s going to be an amazing journey.
0.5
Physical ScienceScienceThis course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry.
Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves, electricity and magnetism, the matter around
us, chemical bonding and reactions. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of the
physical sciences. The utilization of scientific inquiry, web 2.0 tools, interactive experiences, higher order
thinking, collaborative projects, real world application through labs and a variety of assessments all aid
the student in ultimately demonstrating a vast understanding of the importance of the physical and
chemical properties of the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their
everyday lives.
1
Physics IScienceIn each module of Physics I, students discover the contributions of scientific geniuses like Galileo,
Newton, and Einstein. Through their work, students learn the concepts, theories, and laws that govern
the interaction of matter, energy, and forces. From tiny atoms to galaxies with millions of stars, the
universal laws of physics are explained through real-world examples. Using laboratory activities,
simulations, images, and interactive elements, students follow in the footsteps of some of the world’s
greatest thinkers.
Pre-Requisites: Algebra I & II recommended
1
Honors Biology A&BScienceThe science of biology must begin with cell theory, including the structure, function, and chemistry of the cell. Cells form the primary level of organization of all living things. The chemistry and function of each cell shapes the lifestyle of the organism, from feeding to reproductive patterns. This first course in biology focuses on the life of the cell, dealing with issues of structure, transport, genetics, protein synthesis, energy production, and usage. The tools of science are explained and then focused on the living systems in the cell. In the case of genetics, the molecular behavior of DNA is elaborated to show how it determines the visible traits of the organism and population. Thus, you are led on a tour of living systems from the tiniest to the broadest levels of organization. During this tour, you will employ text, computer simulations, videotaped labs, and hands-on investigation to verify each concept and make them relevant to what you see each day. The aim of this course is to guide you, the student, to see your world in biological terms, and then to expand your vision to contemplate current topics in biological research and application.1
Honors Chemistry A&BScienceIn this course, students will discover what chemistry is, and how it is used and found all around us. The importance of the scientific method to solve real world problems will be investigated. Knowledge will be gained in the following areas: types of matter, atomic structure, chemical periodicity, chemical formula writing and naming, chemical equations. This course will also stress the important relationship between math and science while studying measurement, metric system and stoichiometry. Students will use higher order thinking throughout the entire course.1
Honors Physics A&BScienceStudents begin their exploration of physics by reviewing the International System of Units (SI), scientific notation, and significant digits. They then learn to describe and analyze motion in one and two dimensions. Students learn about gravity and Newton’s laws of motion before concluding the course with an examination of circular motion. Students apply mathematical concepts such as graphing and trigonometry in order to solve physics problems. Throughout the course, students apply their understanding of physics by playing roles like science museum curator and elementary teacher.1
PaleontologyScienceFrom Godzilla to Jurassic Park, dinosaurs continue to captivate us. In this course, students will learn about the fascinating creatures both large and small that roamed the earth before modern man. Watch interesting videos from experts at The Royal Tyrrell Museum, a leading paleontology research facility, and discover how the field of paleontology continues to provide amazing insight into early life on earth.0.5
Renewable EnergyScienceThe earth’s population is growing rapidly, and we need to find new, innovative ways to ensure that we are able to provide for our global energy needs. Students will look at the reasons why sustainability is important, take a balanced and evidence-based look at climate change, and learn new ways that we can harness renewable resources.0.5
Space ExplorationScienceIn 1961, Yuri Gagarin became the first human to go to space. In 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first human to step on the moon. This comprehensive course will examine the history and future of space travel. Find out how we have put people in space in the past, and what it will take for us to reach new frontiers, including Mars and beyond.0.5

Social Studies

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credits
American History A&BHistoryThe United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the
country and its people have endured social, political, and economic revolutions. In this course, students
will investigate the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from the end of the
Civil War through today. Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political,
business, and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and
present. This course also gives students the opportunity to conduct research and apply their learning to
current, real-world problems.
Pre-Requisites: This course is recommended for students in 10th or 11th grade. Successful completion of
English 1 is strongly recommended.
1
American GovernmentHistoryResponsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative
government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about
the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course
also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the
freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of
government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy. The media, interest groups
and influential citizens provide examples of how the government can be effected by informed and active
participants. Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by
participating in the judicial decision making process. They will also discover ways the United States
interacts with countries around the world, through domestic policy, foreign policy and human rights
policy.
Pre-Requisites: 11th or 12th grade status and English I & II recommended
1
US Government for Credit RecoveryHistoryResponsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative
government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about
the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course
also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the
freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of
government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy. The media, interest groups
and, influential citizens provide examples of how the government can be effected by informed and
active participants. Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by

participating in the judicial decision making process. They will also discover ways the United States
interacts with countries around the world, through domestic policy, foreign policy and human rights
policy.
Pre-Requisites: Unsuccessful attempt to earn credit in US Government
1
World History A&BHistoryIn Segment I, students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next,
students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of Islamic Empires. Journey
through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. Students will also
investigate the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel

back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. Segment II begins with a bang as students
will learn about advancements in science and thought during the Age of Enlightenment and the social
and political revolutions that followed as a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they
will learn about the transformation from an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes
that resulted from that shift. Students will then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and
colonialism and the two massive world wars were the end result. As students approach the finish line,
they will learn about development in our modern world and the implications that historical events have
on us today.
1
World History for Credit RecoveryHistoryJoin modern time travelers Ali and Soo-jin as they journey through World History and help students
discover how world events and eras are connected. In Segment 1, students will learn how the Roman
Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and
cultural contributions of the Islamic Empires. They will journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and
Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. While investigating the rise and fall of some of the great
kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and
Reformation era. Segment 2 begins with a bang as students learn about advancements in science and
thought during the Age of Enlightenment, as well as the social and political revolutions that followed as
a result. As students meander through the 19th century, they will learn about the transformation from
an agricultural to an industrial world and the many changes that resulted from that shift. Students will
then learn about the interconnectedness of nationalism and colonialism and the two massive world
wars that were the end result. As students approach the finish line, they will learn about development in
our modern world and the implications that historical events have on us today.
Pre-Requisites: Student has previously completed World History without achieving a passing grade.
1
CivicsHistoryIn this course students will understand the significance of government, law, and politics. They will examine the United States foundational documents and how they shaped the Unites States government. Students will examine the purposes and functions of federal, state and local government, the justice system, political systems the environment, and the economy. Learners will evaluate their role and civic responsibility to their families, communities, and country including voting and being a productive member of society. Students will get to know leaders and influential people that have championed many causes including civil rights and the environment. Learners will also learn proper ways to interact in society including interpersonal skills and respecting differences in others including disabilities. 0.5
Honors American GovernmentHistoryAmerican Government Honors provides the student with the basic knowledge of the history and philosophy of the United States government, and the principles that guide our democracy. The student examines the United States Constitution to answer questions and determine the facts of government. The course focuses on the functions and duties of the three branches of government, which are the legislative, executive, and judicial. Special attention is given to political participation, the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and government systems of the world. American Government Honors references the view of political institutions to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. 0.5
Honors American History A&BHistoryAmerican History A Honors helps students learn the story of the founding of North America by Europeans in the 1600s. A prevailing theme of the course is that America accomplished tasks that no other country had undertaken before. America broke away from Europe, established its own country with a Constitution that has given freedom to more people than any other country in the world, and settled a country by putting that Constitution into practice. The course ends with a study of America’s emergence as a world power at the beginning of the 20th Century. Students will encounter primary and secondary source document investigations, biographies of key individuals, political cartoons, map studies, and period literature.1
Honors World History A&BHistoryS students explore ancient civilizations in order to understand the geographic, political, economic, and social characteristics of people. By developing their understanding of the past, students can better understand the present and determine their direction for the future. In this course, students explore the first civilization in Mesopotamia; the ancient civilizations of China, Greece, and Rome; the rise of the Byzantine Empire; and the feudal system in Europe and Japan. In this course, students examine the factors leading up to World War I, the rise of nationalism, and the worldwide economic depression. The causes of War II, and the military strategies involved are also analyzed. The advances in modern warfare for both World Wars are a special focus. In addition, students learn about the struggle between the ideologies of democracy and communism as well as the change in the balance of power after World War II in which countries fought for self-rule. An appraisal of the Cold War and the fall of the Soviet Union are included. Later lessons find students exploring the roots of terrorism and the conflicts in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Asia. 1
World Geography and Cultures A&BHistoryThe student will be taught to use the basic skills of map reading and development, geographic technology, and the recognition of geographic themes to make sense of the world. The course examines world regions including the nations, people, and cultures of the Americas and Western Europe. This second-semester course continues to teach the basic skills of map reading and development, the use of geographic technology, and the recognition of geographic themes. The focus examines the world regions, including the nations, people, and cultures of Central Europe and Northern Eurasia, Central and Southwest Asia, South Asia, Africa, East Asia, and the Pacific.1

Foreign Language

For credit foreign language courses are NCAA approved using the Middlebury curriculum listed here.

Course
Course Description
College Preparatory/ Work Ready Credit
Credit Value
HS Spanish IHigh School Spanish I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Spanish-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic world. High School Spanish I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Spanish I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.Foreign Language1
HS Spanish IIHigh School Spanish II is the second level of high school Spanish designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Spanish.Foreign Language1
HS French IHigh School French I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to French-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Francophone world. High School French I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School French I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.Foreign Language1
HS French IIHigh School French II is the second level of high school French designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate French.Foreign Language1
HS German IHigh School German I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to German-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the German-speaking world. High School German I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School German I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.Foreign Language1
HS German IIHigh School German II is the second level of high school German designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts. They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate German.Foreign Language1
HS Chinese IHigh School Chinese I is a highly interactive and engaging introductory course designed for students in grades 9-12 and structured around the four key language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Extensive use of authentic materials along with opportunities to apply language in common situations helps motivate students and build their learning confidence. Through a diverse range of multimedia activities and exercises, students are introduced to vocabulary themes, grammar concepts and sentence structure. They participate in simple conversations and respond to basic conversational prompts. Students are actively engaged in their own learning throughout the course. They take frequent assessments and are increasingly aware of individual progress. Introduction to Chinese-speaking countries, as well as history, food, and literature, heightens cultural awareness and appreciation of the Chinese-speaking world. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. High School Chinese I utilizes guided learning and explicit instruction as an effective way to acquire language proficiency. The course is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of High School Chinese I provides the foundation and path for continued learning.Foreign Language1
HS Chinese IIHigh School Chinese II is the second level of high school Chinese designed for grades 9-12. Students expand their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. They begin to fully comprehend listening and reading passages while expressing themselves more meaningfully in both writing and speaking. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, with a focus on reading and listening comprehension, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus and students are expected to learn several characters in each unit; however, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in overall comprehension. Students are actively engaged in their own learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts They also analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, instruction is almost entirely in Chinese. High School Chinese II is aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Successful completion of this course provides the foundation for intermediate Chinese.Foreign Language1
HS Latin IForeign Language1
HS Latin IIForeign Language1

Electives

Course
Course Type
Course Description
Credits
AccountingElectiveIn this semester course, you will explore accounting, including investigating accounting careers. You will learn basic accounting skills and procedures both with and without a computer for general journals, general ledgers, cash payments journals, cash receipts journals, sales journals, accounts payable ledgers, and accounts receivable ledgers. You will also learn how to reconcile a bank statement and to prepare payroll records.0.5
Art AppreciationFINE ARTSWhat makes an artwork a masterpiece? Why do artists create art? What is the difference between Rococo and Art Nouveau? In this course, students will discover the answers to these questions and more. We examine the elements of art and principles of design, and explore how artists have used these elements and principles in the creation of art for centuries.0.5
Art HistoryFINE ARTSArt History course integrates the four components of art study: art production, historical and cultural context, critical process and aesthetic process. Students will be able to identify and describe art from prehistoric times to modern time. Throughout this course, students will discuss various artworks, research artists, and create documents and presentations demonstrating concepts learned.0.5
Arts CareersElectiveFor every Broadway dancer, every television star, and every pop singer, there are countless people behind the scenes helping to make it happen. Arts Careers introduces students to the skills that are part of many fascinating careers in the arts. Studying the arts creates independent and innovative thinkers and many doors are open to an artist with the proper training.0.5
Basic DrawingElectiveIn Basic Drawing, students will experiment with several different art materials and tools to see what each tool can do best. Students will explore ordinary things around them to become more observant of the structures and meanings of things which can be seen in your their home and community.0.5
Basic Web DesignCOMPUTER TECHIn this course, students will learn how to design a beautiful and functional website. Students will learn how to take their design and translate it into a live website using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) programing languages. HTML5 and CSS3 will be the standard versions used in the class. Students will understand design components of websites, including the use of color, layout and when to use different techniques, typography rules, and the importance of imagery.0.5
Beginning PaintingFINE ARTSThis course introduces students to classical and contemporary painting, techniques and concepts, with emphasis on the understanding of its formal language and the fundamentals of artistic expression. Painting from still life, landscape, and life models from observation will be geared towards realism; at the same time, various other painting styles could be explored. Color theory, linear perspective, compositional structure, figure/ground relationships, visual perception, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills will all be emphasized. Students will study and research major painting styles and movements in historical context.0.5
Business LawElectiveStudents learn about the American legal system. They examine ethics, court systems, criminal law, and law of torts. They examine how the court systems work together, and what misconduct results in going to court. It is important to also understand your consumer rights. As they progress through the course, they will also gain an understanding from a business perspective what is right and wrong business actions and employment laws. As an employee or employer it is important to understand the laws that protect the employee and employer. The study will focus on the formation of a business and the basic legal issues associated with each type of business.0.5
Career PlanningElectiveThe Career Planning course guides students through the essential elements of the career planning process and the development of a defined career plan. Students will consider the many factors that impact career success and satisfaction. Using a process of investigation, research, and self-discovery, students will acquire the understandings critical to the career planning process. Upon completion of the course, students will have created a practical and comprehensive college or career transition portfolio that reflects their skills and abilities, as well as their interests, values, and goals.0.5
Character EducationElectiveThis course teaches students practical skills for understanding and managing their emotions, setting goals and getting organized, understanding and getting along with others in our diverse world, and making good decisions. Research shows that people who practice these skills have greater academic achievement as students and experience more success and satisfaction as adults.0.5
Child DevelopmentElectiveThis course is designed to help prepare students for their responsibilities as parents and caregivers of children. Topics include prenatal care, growth and development through age six, teen pregnancy, maternal health, parenting skills, and child guidance.0.5
Computer BasicsCOMPUTER TECHIn this course you will learn how to use productivity and collaboration tools, such as G Suite by Google Cloud to create word processing documents, spreadsheets, surveys and forms such as personal budgets and invitations.0.5
Digital MediaElectiveIn this course, students will learn basic principles of audio and video design and production. The concepts of understanding audience and copyright are used throughout the course. Students will learn to create a script for an audio production. They will also produce an audio project utilizing Audacity. For the video production portion of the course students will learn about the benefits of storyboards along with other pre-production, production, and post-production techniques. Students will create a 60 second video utilizing a web 2.0 editing tool called WeVideo. The course will culminate with the creation of an online digital portfolio that can be used to showcase the student’s work to colleges or potential employers.0.5
Digital PhotographyElectiveUnderstanding the tools available opens the possibilities to create images with impact. In Digital Photography, students will study the history of photography as well as the basic operation of a digital camera. As they are introduced to different styles of photography and photographers, students will begin to develop artistic skills as well as their own voice through their photographs.0.5
EconomicsElectiveThis course introduces the principles and the applications of economics in everyday life. Students develop an understanding of limited resources, and compare it with unlimited wants and needs. Students learn how individual and national economic decisions are made to allocate goods and services among competing users. Students apply economic principles to think and problem solve. The study of Economics uses the view of economic institutions and policies to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government in controlling our economy. It offers students learning opportunities that build one on another. A goal of the course is for the student to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a demanding and thoughtful academic setting. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge of the policies and institutions of economics to develop their own views on current economic and monetary issues. 0.5
Film and TelevisionElectiveThe culture of cinema and television tells a unique story of history and innovation. Students in Film and Television will be introduced to industry icons and stars of the big and small screen. By studying and writing about film and television, students will analyze trends in technology and culture and better understand how to be an informed viewer.0.5
Financial LiteracyElectiveThis course is designed to help students budget, keep a checkbook and filing system, deal with debt and credit, and become wiser consumers. Students will learn how money and the dynamics surrounding it affect their relationships, their lifestyles, and their retirement.0.5
First AidElectiveIn this course, students learn and practice first aid procedures for a variety of common conditions, including muscular, skeletal, and soft tissue injuries. In addition, students learn how to appropriately respond to a variety of emergency situations. They also learn the procedures for choking and CPR for infants, children, and adults. In addition to emergency response, students will explore personal, household, and outdoor safety, and disaster preparedness.0.5
Flexibility Training#ElectiveThis course focuses on the often-neglected fitness component of flexibility. Students establish their fitness level, set goals, and design their own flexibility training program. They study muscular anatomy and learn specific exercises to stretch each muscle or muscle group. Students focus on proper posture and technique while training. They also gain an understanding of how to apply the FITT principles to flexibility training. This course explores aspects of static, isometric, and dynamic stretching, as well as touch on aspects of yoga and Pilates. This course also discusses good nutrition and effective cross-training. Students take a pre- and post fitness assessment. Throughout this course students also participate in a weekly fitness program involving flexibility training, as well as elements of cardio and strength training.0.5
Graphic DesignFINE ARTSGraphic Design is an introduction to elements of design, spatial relationships, typography and imagery as they apply to practical visual solutions for self-promotion, resumes, logo design, Web design, and sequential systems. In this course, the student explores the basic foundations of design through a series of visual projects that explore the principles and elements of design. Students will work both with analog and digital media as they explore two-dimensional and three-dimensional design along with color theory. This course will help develop and explore a student’s ability to communicate visually.0.5
Health A&BElectiveIn this course, students acquire the knowledge and skills they need to lead a healthy life. Semester A focuses on the impact of personal decisions on the student’s own health. Students learn how to find, evaluate, and use reliable information related to a variety of health topics. They also study the basic science behind nutrition, exercise, stress, and psychology, and examine how these factors affect a person’s overall health. Semester B focuses on the developmental aspects of being human and healthy. Students learn about some of the more dramatic changes that the human body experiences from birth to death. They explore topics related to aging and sexuality and identify ways to remain healthy and safe throughout life’s major events and challenges. As in Semester A, this part of the course emphasizes what students can do to improve or maintain their own health and encourages them to be a positive influence on family and friends.1
Health CareersElectiveIn this course students explore a variety of career options related to the health care field, including medicine, nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy, dental careers, child care, sports medicine, personal training, social work, psychology, and more. Students will learn about various options within each field, what each of these jobs entails, and the education and knowledge required to be successful. In addition, they will focus on basic job skills and information that would aid them in health care and other career paths.0.5
Honors EconomicsElectiveEconomics Honors provides the student with basic knowledge of the history and philosophy of the United States economy and the economic principles that guide our democracy. Students demonstrate problem solving, and their understanding of the processes for economic reasoning, by applying economic principles to decisions they make as consumers, workers, and members of local and larger societies. This, in turn, enables the student to understand the issues and public policies that affect economic, political, and cultural systems. The course focuses on the functions and duties of the three branches of government, which are the legislative, executive, and judicial as they relate to the economy. Special attention is given to the role of the Federal Reserve System in administering the United States economy.0.5
Individual and Team SportsElectiveTo improve and maintain optimum health, it is necessary for people of all ages to participate in physical exercise. There is little doubt that, in addition to students in schools, the number of adults participating in sports and recreational activities in the United States has increased in recent years. Physical education is much more than just fitness and exercise. A well-planned program will cause you to think and express your emotions about different situations. In addition, a good program can make a valuable contribution to your education. These experiences will help you develop a sense of wellness.0.5
JournalismElectiveThis course is designed to prepare you to become a student of journalism and media. The work we do here will equip you with the critical skills you must have to succeed in high school media, college media, and beyond. We will read a variety of journalistic material and do a great deal of news writing. We will also look at journalism from legal, ethical, and historic vantage points. Expect to complete numerous writing activities in a variety of styles including editorial, hard news, feature, review, and more. If you participate actively, you will gain tremendous skills that will serve you for the rest of your life. Individual and group project will also be a part of this class. This course is a project based course and does not include traditional tests, unit level understanding is assessed through unit projects.0.5
Life Management SkillsElectiveEach day hundreds of decisions are made, including important decisions that have a huge impact on
personal life. Making good decisions is a whole lot easier for those who have the correct information
before making those decisions. Being equipped with correct information will empower students to
manage real issues, like quality nutrition, substance abuse, coping with stress, and sexual abstinence.
Good health is both mental and physical. Making good decisions starts with knowing the facts,
understanding the consequences, and having the confidence to choose well. A series of signposts take
students through the course, providing information, direction, and a little encouragement. Students
learn to use important tools for communicating feelings and opinions. Other tools provide a foundation
for becoming a savvy consumer in a world of advertising, credit cards, and focusing on earth-friendly
practices that will help the environment. This course comes with a long-term payoff. Learning to make
good decisions now will set a positive direction to follow for the future.
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Music AppreciationFINE ARTSStudents will gain a thorough understanding of music by studying the elements of music, musical instruments, and music history, as well as music advocacy. Students will be introduced to the orchestra and composers from around the world. They will be required to be a composer, performer, instrument inventor, and advocate.0.5
NutritionElectiveThis course takes students through a comprehensive study of nutritional principles and guidelines. Students will learn about world-wide views of nutrition, nutrient requirements, physiological processes, food labeling, healthy weight management, diet related diseases, food handling, nutrition for different populations, and more. Students will gain important knowledge and skills to aid them in attaining and maintaining a healthy and nutritious lifestyle.0.5
Physical Education A&BElectivePhysical Education encompasses learning how to live and maintain a healthy lifestyle. This course covers physical fitness, why it is important, how to have a healthy attitude, and how to stick with a healthy game plan. In this ever-changing world, physical fitness becomes more important and more difficult to find the time for. This course allows the student to discover how to make physical fitness not only a part of their daily life, but also see that it is attainable. This course leads the student to discover healthy behaviors and sets the tone for physical fitness as well as healthy exercise. PE for a Healthy Lifestyle will examine the emotional, physical, and scientific factors that influence physical performance. This course is designed for anyone, ranging from the beginner to advanced abilities.1
Psychology A&BElectiveUnderstanding the thoughts, emotions and behaviors of self and others is critical to developing and
maintaining interpersonal relationships. In Psychology I, students learn theories of historically significant
psychologists who laid the foundation for scientific research and a clearer understanding of the human
mind. This course explores how psychological perspectives influence personality and play a role in
human development across the lifespan. Students examine how behaviors are developed, memories are
stored and language is acquired. Students also learn about the symptoms and classifications of
psychological disorders, along with the various forms of treatments available. After completing this
course, students will be equipped with problem solving strategies and even learn methods to cope with
stress. Practical, everyday application of the content is a focus of this course.
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RunningElectiveThis course is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced runners and offers a variety of training schedules for each. In addition to reviewing the fundamental principles of fitness, students learn about goals and motivation, levels of training, running mechanics, safety and injury prevention, appropriate attire, running in the elements, good nutrition and hydration, and effective cross-training.0.5
SociologyElectiveSociology examines the basics of sociology, which is the study of society including individuals, human groups, and organizations. The course is divided into four main areas: the sociological perspective, social structures, inequality in society, and social institutions and change. Students will examine controversies around social change, inequality, gender, and race. The course revolves around an overview of the field with projects that offer the student a chance to explore from a sociologist’s perspective.0.5
Strength TrainingElectiveThis course focuses on the fitness components of muscular strength and endurance. Students establish their fitness level, set goals, and design their own resistance training program. They study muscular anatomy and learn specific exercises to strengthen each muscle or muscle group. Students focus on proper posture and technique while training. They also gain an understanding of how to apply the FITT principles and other fundamental exercise principles, such as progression and overload, to strength training.0.5
Study Skills and StrategiesElectiveThe Study Skills and Strategies course equips students with skills and understandings critical to effective learning. Using a unique approach to the traditional topic of study skills, this course weaves understanding regarding the role of the brain in learning into the instruction of discrete learning skills and strategies. Moving beyond a list of good tips and ideas, the Study Skills and Strategies course will challenge students to develop intentional approaches to learning. 0.5
Theater StudiesElectiveHave you ever wondered how a play goes from the playwright’s mind all the way into a multi- million dollar Broadway production? In this course, you’ll learn the whole process! This course provides a thorough introduction to the theater by providing an overview of major topics in theater studies, with a blend of theoretical and practical lessons. In the first half of this course you will learn about the definitions of theater, theater history, and contemporary theatrical genres.0.5
Walking FitnessElectiveThis course helps students establish a regular walking program for health and fitness. Walking is appropriate for students of all fitness levels and is a great way to maintain a moderately active lifestyle. In addition to reviewing fundamental principles of fitness, students learn about goals and motivation, levels of training, walking mechanics, safety and injury prevention, appropriate attire, walking in the elements, good nutrition and hydration, and effective cross-training. Students take a pre- and post fitness assessment. Throughout this course students also participate in a weekly fitness program involving walking, as well as elements of resistance training and flexibility.0.5
World of STEAMElectiveEach aspect of the arts relies on science and technology. In The World of STEAM, students will learn why the eye sees color, how a dancer uses gravity and what makes a sound wave travel. The arts, science and technology are intertwined, now more than ever. Understanding the science behind the art will elevate students to a new level of creativity.0.5